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Our ongoing selection of journalism and media news.

 
 
 
  • 21 October 2011 | {CATEGORY}

    In the aftermath of the Arab Spring revolutions, journalists ask: “Who is a journalist?”

    A repeated concern at the ENJN closing conference, expressed mostly by delegates from the Middle East and North Africa, revolved around the definition of a journalist today. “Can we still talk of freedom of speech in the age of Internet?” asked an Arab delegate. “I would say that at this time, our problem is not one of freedom, but rather, how the citizens stole our profession.”
  • 20 October 2011 | {CATEGORY}

    ENJN closing conference: main takeaways - Day 2

    How do media developments in Eastern Europe compare with those in Arab countries that are undergoing in social, economic and political transformations? What can be learned from their experience? These questions and more were addressed on 11 October at the ENJN closing conference in Brussels that brought together more than 200 journalists and media professionals from southern Mediterranean, Eastern European and Southern Caucasus countries. Here are the main takeaways of the second day of the conference.
  • 20 October 2011 | {CATEGORY}

    ENJN closing conference: main takeaways - Day 1

    More than 200 journalists and media professionals from southern Mediterranean, Eastern European and Southern Caucasus countries met on 10-11 October at the ENJN closing conference in Brussels to exchange views on the democratising power of new media in the context of the Arab Spring revolutions and gather insights from experiences in Eastern Europe. Here are the main takeaways of the discussions that took place on the first day of the conference.
  • 23 February 2010 | {CATEGORY}

    Small talk: Notes of a multilingual writer

    As a child, I called my father Zinho. For many years, my brother, sister and I were convinced that Zinho was his real name. How surprised we were to discover this wasn't the case at all! “Zinho is just the male diminutive form in Portuguese and doesn't really mean anything,” my father laughed. “My name is Alain, or Alan in Portuguese. Your mother used to call me Alanzinho when you were small but Alanzinho was too long and difficult for you children to pronounce so you shortened it into Zinho, and it became my nickname.” I have found the same fondness for diminutive forms in Dutch as in Portuguese. In Dutch they can be recognised by the suffixes -je, -tje, -pje, -etje, -kje, such as in bloempje (little flower), jasje (light coat) or hondje (little dog).