Project news & updates

News Integrity Initiative teams up with international partners, announces $2.5 million in grants

2 November 2017 | PRESS RELEASE

 

(New York, November 2, 2017) The News Integrity Initiative at the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism is pleased to announce $2.5 million in grants to Internews and the European Journalism Centre to support community-focused journalism around the globe.

“Internews and European Journalism Centre, combined, work in more than 150 countries,” noted Jeff Jarvis, NII executive committee member and director of the Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism at the CUNY J-School. “We want to listen and learn from their extensive networks of newsrooms, nonprofits and other partners around the world. We also look forward to sharing ideas and examples of innovative, community-first journalism.”

NII is building an alliance of partners from different sectors – academia, media, tech, nonprofits, community organizations and others - devoted to a vision of journalism that serves as a force for building trust, empathy and solutions in our communities.

Following are details of the two grants:

European Journalism Centre ($1,500,000)

The Engaged Journalism Accelerator will offer a comprehensive accelerator program to help newsrooms develop tools and reporting that empower communities and their conversations across Europe. This two-year grant includes support for a prototype fund to kickstart the next generation of engaged journalism pioneers and projects, as well as a cross-border training series and mentoring program.

The European Journalism Centre is an international non-profit foundation that connects journalists with new ideas. Since 1992, through grants, events, training and media development, the European Journalism Centre has been building a sustainable, ethical and innovative future for journalism.

Website: http://ejc.net/

Internews ($1,000,000)

To create the Global Media Solutions Coalition, which will research, support and share systemic solutions to the decline of high quality, local news and information around the world and the increase in disinformation, hate speech and increasing polarization. This two-year grant also supports regional gatherings, beginning with Asia and Africa, to grow membership in the Coalition while also capturing ideas and resources for an Online Solutions Library.

The Global Media Solutions Coalition’s inaugural partners include Internews, the News Integrity Initiative, The London School of Economics / POLIS, Bloomberg, LP, The Global Forum for Media Development and GSMA Mobile for Development.

Website: https://www.internews.org/

In addition to these two grants, NII has previously announced grants totaling nearly $2 million to foster trust between newsrooms and the public, and nurture constructive, inclusive community conversations.

About the News Integrity Initiative
The News Integrity Initiative is a project of the CUNY Graduate School of Journalism Foundation under the auspices of the School’s Tow-Knight Center for Entrepreneurial Journalism. The fund is seeded with $14 million in grants from a coalition of partners, which currently include Facebook, Craig Newmark Philanthropic Fund, Ford Foundation, AppNexus, Knight Foundation, Tow Foundation, Betaworks, Mozilla, and Democracy Fund.

For more information, please visit: www.newsintegrity.com.

Contact:
Molly de Aguiar, Managing Director
News Integrity Initiative
Email: molly@newsintegrity.com
Phone: 646-758-7790

Project:
News Integrity Initiative
The Engaged Journalism Accelerator will offer a comprehensive accelerator program to help newsrooms develop tools and reporting that empower communities and their conversations across Europe. This two-year grant includes support for a prototype fund to kickstart the next generation of engaged journalism pioneers and projects, as well as a cross-border training series and mentoring program.

The European Journalism Centre is pleased to announce that European Publishers Reporting Grants, aiming to foster an innovative approach to global development coverage, have been awarded to Society (France), Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung (Germany), de Volkskrant (the Netherlands), VPRO (the Netherlands), CNN (UK), ELLE UK (UK) and The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (UK).

Adam Thomas, Director of the European Journalism Centre, said “the scope, quality and volume of applications for this round of publisher grants was unprecedented. From globally-renowned media to emerging startups, seven winners demonstrated an innovative and impactful approach to the storytelling topics and technology. This reporting will inform communities throughout our target countries, proving them with data and information about global issues of employment, health, food and gender that affect all of us.”

Over the course of next year, the seven media organisations will be granted around €120k each to create news verticals on selected United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) using distinctive storytelling ideas, new engaging content forms and emerging data journalism techniques.

Brieux Férot, head of development of So Press, said: “Launching Good Job! by Society thanks to the European Journalism Centre is a tremendous and thrilling opportunity that has triggered a lot of excitement among our small and passionate team. As a media group recently created with a new generation of editors, reporters, artistic directors and photographers, we are strongly attached to reinvent, as far as we can, independent journalism. In our daily lives, we believe in hope, we believe in change and we believe in young - but not only - talent to succeed in solving the formula storytelling x journalism.

  • Society will look at development issues through the lens of the jobs of exemplary individuals in some of the least developed countries, as well as into the wider framework conditions under which these jobs take place.
  • Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung will have a comparative and frequent view of two villages, one in Germany and another in a developing country, on their challenging race to increase food production.
  • de Volkskrant will report on food corridors as a solution to fight poverty and hunger in Africa, by way of approaching the topic from a sociological, economic, environmental as well as a political perspective.
  • VPRO, through their subsite Metropolis, will engage their audience with an international network of local reporters through global and yet individual and bespoke everyday stories of people living in the world’s least developed countries.
  • CNN will present critical issues of gender equality and women’s health and well being in the world’s least developed countries as more than just sets of overwhelming and academic statistics from far away places.
  • ELLE UK will produce ground-breaking multimedia feature stories on women’s rights and gender equality from nine developing countries, with a particular focus on local “heroines”, women finding solutions to everyday problems in their communities.
  • The Bureau of Investigative Journalism will investigate how the growth of drug-resistant infections can threaten strong and resilient health systems, reporting from some of the world’s poorest and wealthiest countries.

Mathias Müller von Blumencron, editor-in-chief of Digital Media at Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, said: “We are grateful to be selected for this grant. It will inspire us to carry out this great new project about one of the most urgent tasks of the next decades: how to feed the world.”

Kustaw Bessems, digital editor at De Volkskrant, said: In a time of information overload and fake news, it is our job to distinguish ourselves with expertise, by being where it matters and with in-depth research. But it also matters more than ever that we get our stories to the audience it deserves. With a truly cross medial approach and smart online distribution. We are delighted that this grant allows us to report in precisely this spirit and over a longer period of time on a topic close to our hearts: food corridors as a solution to fight hunger and poverty in Africa. Or to put it more bluntly: how to feed 9 billion people by 2050?

Stan van Engelen, editor-in-chief TV at VPRO, said: ‘We are very happy with the support of the European Journalism Centre. Metropolis is all about telling remarkable personal stories of everyday life, meanwhile raising awareness for the biggest global challenges, embodied in the SDG’s. Our international video reporters are thrilled to create new stories from around the world. This grant gives us the opportunity to change the tv format into an online only format, introduce story threads and innovate our storytelling and distribution strategies. For VPRO this is a chance to continue with an important form of journalism, in which a truly authentic, personal, non-western perspective shows our world literally from ‘the other side’.

Blathnaid Healy, senior editor at CNN Digital, said: “Gender equality is an increasingly well covered topic in the developed world, but less so in the world’s least developed countries. CNN is honored to be selected as a recipient of the European Journalism Centre’s Journalism Grants and excited that we can expand our reporting of this under covered topic and bring it to new audiences around the globe. This grant will enable CNN to tell challenging, insightful and heartening human stories about gender equality in the world’s least developed countries in highly engaging and thought-provoking ways.”

Natasha Bird, digital editor of ELLE UK, said: “We’re extremely delighted to be receiving this grant from the European Journalism Centre, and for a project that’s so important to ELLE. Though perceptibly a fashion and lifestyle publication, feminism and the furthering of women’s rights has long been a part of ELLE’s core DNA and we look forward to shining further light on the issue in nine countries across the developing world. We’ve admired the work of The Fuller Project, a journalism nonprofit that produces hard-hitting reporting on under-covered issues impacting women globally. It’s an honor to partner with them and work with their journalists to deliver a multi-media, 360 approach over the next year”.

Rachel Oldroyd, managing editor at The Bureau of Investigative Journalism, said: “The Bureau of Investigative Journalism is absolutely delighted to have received a grant from the European Journalism Centre. The funds will allow us to dig deep into how the rise of superbugs could seriously undermine the world’s ability to deliver several of the SDGs. This is an area the Bureau has been investigating for some time, and we are grateful to have considerable added resource to allow our reporters to undertake crucial on-the-ground reporting and apply some innovative production resources to help our storytelling.”

All seven awarded projects will be freely accessible to a national or global online audience without any access barriers or registration.

For more information about this grant, please click here or contact publishers@journalismgrants.org

About the European Journalism Centre and the grants

The European Journalism Centre is an international non-profit that connects journalists with new ideas. Through grants, events, training and media development the European Journalism Centre has been building a sustainable, ethical and innovative future for journalism since 1992.

The European Publishers Longterm Reporting Grant is a special edition of the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme (IDR), a media-funding project operated by the European Journalism Centre that aims to enable a better coverage of international development issues. It is supported by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation and since 2013, €4m has been awarded, with over 140 projects funded involving 365 grantees and 230 media partners.

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Website: https://publishers.journalismgrants.org/
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Website: http://ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Monday 7 August 2017

The European Journalism Centre announced today the release of Turkish translation of its Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting, a companion handbook to the initial Verification Handbook. The translated version was produced by Teyit.orgd, an independent online media focusing on verifying online and political contents and news. Following the editions in Arabic, Macedonian and Russian, this is the fourth official translation of this companion handbook.

The Turkish version of the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting is now made available via: LINK

Mehmet Atakan Foca, the Founder and Editor-in-Chief says “Improving digital literacy and awareness on false reporting is getting more important. Working against biased news is essential such in a country like Turkey where polarized media and propaganda are extensive. Many users interested in Verification Handbook, it has been downloaded over 20k times. We await that this book will get more interest from users.”

Other translations are made available via the original English edition via this link.

About Teyit.org

Teyit.org operates as an online reference portal broadcasting both in Turkish and English and works on scanning, selecting, checking, analysing, archiving and publishing information on questionable/suspicious content particularly during the situations of crisis when there is massive spread of unverified/false information and biased content. Teyit is online with the intent of ensuring that the citizens who use internet as a source of news and non-governmental organizations have access to true information, encouraging people to think critically and to have awareness about accessing true information.

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For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:

Bianca Lemmens

Email: info@ejc.net

Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

Press release

The European Journalism Centre

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Maastricht, June 20, 2017

The European Journalism Centre today launched three grant programmes for freelancers and media organisations that will fund stories to inform public opinion and change the way people understand development issues.

Adam Thomas, director of the European Journalism Centre said: “Since its launch in 2013, our Journalism Grants programme has awarded €4.5m to 140 projects across Europe. In doing so, it has built a community of journalists who are changing the way European audiences understand development issues, whilst creating new and inventive forms of storytelling through data, video and social media.”

Selection criteria include editorial focus and quality, impact and reach, and innovation. Previous winners have involved creative uses of video, audio, imagery, data, text, maps, graphics, quizzes, animation and other engaging content forms. Grants projects have previously been given awards such as the Gabriel García Márquez Prize, World Press Photo Innovation in Multimedia Award, and the Data Journalism Awards 2016.

The call opens today for the following applications:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant (IDR), Round #10

Eligible: Both freelance journalists and employed newsroom staff may apply. There is no citizenship, nationality or residence/location restriction on the applicants as long as the final results are published in media outlets with significant reach to audiences in one or more of the following European countries: France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and United Kingdom.

Amount awarded: The grant given is up to €20,000.

Deadline to apply: 6 September 2017, (22:00 CET)

For further information on applications eligibility criteria, click here.

Queries on this grant should be addressed to info@journalismgrants.org

The European Publishers Longterm Reporting Grant, Round #2

Topic: We are looking to fund original reporting about the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs) with respect to one or more of the world’s Least Developed Countries (LDCs),and/or the respective key European donor country’s development relations with LDCs over the course of one year.

Eligible: This grant programme is open to media organisations in France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden and United Kingdom.

Format: The project shall take the format of a dedicated microsite or a dedicated website sub-page.

Amount awarded: The grant given is up to €130,000.

Deadline to apply: 26 July 2017, (22:00 CET)

For further information on applications eligibility criteria, click here.

Queries on this grant should be addressed to publishers@journalismgrants.org

The Global Health Journalism Grant for Germany

Topic: This grant programme is looking to award projects that deal with global health and provide a link to Germany in their stories. The reporting should be connected to Germany’s global health policies or the health-related activities of either German government organisations or NGOs on the ground.

Eligible: This edition is open to freelance journalists experienced in reporting on health, science or development, and publishing in German media.

Amount awarded: The grant given is up to €10,000.

Deadline to apply: 27 September 2017, (22:00 CET)

For further information on applications eligibility criteria, click here.

Queries on this grant should be addressed to healthreporting@journalismgrants.org

To apply for any of these three calls, click here

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About the European Journalism Centre

The European Journalism Centre is an international non-profit that connects journalists with new ideas. Through grants, events, training and media development the European Journalism Centre has been building a sustainable, ethical and innovative future for journalism since 1992.

The European Journalism Centre is running the Journalism Grants programme with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

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Website:http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook:http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter:http://twitter.com/journagrants
Website: http://ejc.net

 

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
23 March 2017

The European Journalism Centre announced today the launch of “Press Released”, a new platform and commentary series established in partnership with non-profit editorial service Project Syndicate to stimulate debate around the global challenges confronting media and journalists.  The series, available to Project Syndicate’s 500+ member media outlets for publication, showcases material produced by some of the organization’s most prolific contributors specialized in the media field. The series will also feature commentary by economic, political and cultural thought leaders to illustrate media’s impacts across all spheres of society.

The latest addition to Project Syndicate’s “PS Focus” series, “Press Released” addresses the growing threats to independent media and journalist safety across the globe. From ‘fake news’ and digital security to self-censorship and outdated business models, “Press Released” seeks to immerse and engage readers in the latest issues raging around the media and the consequences for civil society and good governance. 

““Press Released” is much needed and perfectly timed” says European Journalism Centre director Adam Thomas. “Truth, transparency and accountability have never been in higher demand. “Press Released” shines a light on the challenges journalists face, but also gives strategies on how to counteract them.”

The first contribution to the series is Francis Fukuyama’s The Emergence of a Post-Fact World.

European Journalism Centre is currently matching donations made by anyone interested in supporting “Press Released” and its mission. Please visit the Launch Page for more information.

Contact: info@ejc.net

About the partners

The European Journalism Centre is an international non-profit that connects journalists with new ideas. Through grants, events, training and media development the European Journalism Centre has been building a sustainable, ethical and innovative future for journalism since 1992.

Project Syndicate produces and delivers original, high-quality commentaries to a global audience. Featuring exclusive contributions by prominent political leaders, policymakers, scholars, business leaders, and civic activists from around the world, Project Syndicate provides news media and their readers cutting-edge analysis and insight.

 

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
15 March 2017


The European Journalism Centre announced today five News Impact Summits will take place in Rome, Hamburg, Budapest, Manchester and Brussels in 2017. A new training initiative - the News Impact Academy - will also take place in each city.

The free-to-attend media innovation events, organised by the European Journalism Centre and powered by the Google News Lab, bring together international experts with local news communities to focus on how new technology, tools and methods can change the way journalists work in the newsroom.

Previously the News Impact Summit series has visited 14 countries with 18 summits in total, and the 260 speakers have included journalism leaders from The New York Times, BBC, Spiegel Online, Le Monde, Financial Times, Sky News, Vice News, Buzzfeed, Politico, ProPublica, Vox, ESPN, The Economist and Al-Jazeera.

2017 also sees the launch of a new initiative: the News Impact Academy. Five intensive workshops will connect, support and develop digital innovators in European newsrooms and start-ups. Invited participants will learn techniques and share best practices for defining new revenue models, building digital products and creating sustainable business initiatives.

Adam Thomas, Director of the European Journalism Centre, said: “News Impact Summits have evolved to become some of the most engaging and essential media events in the calendar. With the addition of the News Impact Academy, the series will inspire and train the next generation of innovative news leaders in everything from advertising to algorithms, and from analytics to artificial intelligence.”

Matt Cooke, from Google News Lab, added: “We’re excited to collaborate again with the European Journalism Centre - the News Impact Summits are a great way to bring journalists together, to share best practice examples and showcase digital experts from newsrooms around the world. The new Academy series will be a great addition to the programme!”

The News Impact Summit and Academy will be organised in the following cities and dates:

Rome, Italy

  • Summit: Tuesday 23 May
  • Academy: Wednesday 24 May

Hamburg, Germany

  • Summit: Thursday 29 June
  • Academy: Friday 30 June

Budapest, Hungary

  • Summit: Tuesday 19 September
  • Academy: Wednesday 20 September

Manchester, UK

  • Summit: Thursday 2 November
  • Academy: Friday 3 November

Brussels, Belgium

  • Summit: Monday 4 December
  • Academy: Tuesday 5 December

The registration for the Summits and Academy will be open at newsimpact.io. In order to receive updates, subscribe our News Impact newsletter here.

Website: https://newsimpact.io
Contact: info@newsimpact.io

About the partners

The European Journalism Centre is an international non-profit that connects journalists with new ideas. Through grants, events, training and media development the European Journalism Centre has been building a sustainable, ethical and innovative future for journalism since 1992.
The Google News Lab empowers the creation of media that improves people’s lives. Our mission is to collaborate with journalists and entrepreneurs everywhere to build the future of media with Google. We do this through product partnerships, media trainings, and programs that foster the development of the news industry as a whole.

 

Project:
News Impact
The European Journalism Centre (EJC) and Google will hold its first News Impact Summit on Tuesday, 21 October 2014 in Vienna, Austria. Journalists, editors, newsroom managers, journalism trainers, and J-school students are invited to attend this free-of-charge public event.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Maastricht, 1 March 2017


The European Journalism Centre launches today The New Arrivals, a collaborative journalism project that brings together El País (Spain), The Guardian (UK), Le Monde (France) and Spiegel Online (Germany) to report on migration to Europe.

Over a period of 18 months, the four news organisations will closely follow newly-arrived migrant communities in each of their countries to illustrate their integration challenges, their humanitarian situation, their professional aspirations, and the impact of their arrival on both the host and the home countries.

The Guardian will cover the story of a nine year-old Afghan boy now settled in the city of Derby, who fled the Taliban with his parents and six siblings, but became separated from all except his father. Spiegel Online will cover a Syrian family who left Damascus and have now been relocated in the northern city of Lüneburg. Le Monde will track a Sudanese family who are to be resettled in a remote area of the French interior. El País will follow a group of six youths from Cameroon, Morocco, Bolivia and Senegal playing in a local football team in the Andalusian town of Jerez de la Frontera.

In additional to the original reporting, the four media outlets will translate and contribute to each other’s articles studying and comparing different scenarios for migrants and refugees within the four countries. Content will be posted to Facebook, Instagram and Twitter using the hashtag #thenewarrivals. The project is funded by the European Journalism Centre via a grant by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Mark Rice-Oxley, Head of Special Projects at The Guardian, said: “The Guardian has extensively covered the perilous journeys made by hundreds of thousands of migrants to Europe, and The New Arrivals will see us focus on how they are settling into their new lives. We’re pleased to be joining with Le Monde, El País and Spiegel Online on such an important and ground-breaking project and look forward sharing the stories of those affected with our readers.”

Eva Thöne, Editor at Spiegel Online added: “In the year of Bundestag elections, the discussion about integration influences the public debate, divides parties and German society - and is often shaped by stereotypes and prejudices about Arab countries. By representing and following the living situations of a refugee family, we hope to find a way to combine moving stories and portraits with a differentiated view on immigration.”

David Alandete, Managing Editor at El País, said: “Europe is still struggling to find a way to cope with the worst humanitarian crisis of the past fifty years. The refugees are here and they are part of our society, not just numbers or statistics. We aim to tell their stories: their pain, fears, wishes and projects. By following a soccer team in Spain we hope to reveal what the human side of the crisis is.”

Serge Michel, Editor-in-Chief of Le Monde Afrique, added: “France and its foreigners, what a topic! Will France roll into a tight ball with all spikes pointing outwards, following the hedgehog strategy of the Front National? Or will the country find a new republican pact? From Calais to the Aquarius boat saving lives in the sea, Le Monde is covering migration issues intensively. With the New Arrivals, and in partnership with three great European media, we will now also follow the daily life of a migrant family in their host country, see how France treats them and if they fail or succeed.”

Adam Thomas, Director of the European Journalism Centre, said: “For months, experienced journalists have been working incredibly hard to source, research and contextualise the families and journeys they are covering. This level of European collaboration around such a topic is unprecedented. With 2017 set to witness over ten national elections on the continent, projects of this scale are vital.”

Key links


Resources

For more information about this project and interviews, contact migration@journalismgrants.org

Press photos are available for use here in relation to the project (with credit) here.


About the European Journalism Centre

The European Journalism Centre is an international non-profit foundation that connects journalists with new ideas. Since 1992, through grants, events, training and media development the European Journalism Centre has been building a sustainable, ethical and innovative future for journalism.

 

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Russian translation of the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting released

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

19 December, 2016

On 19 December 2016, the European Journalism Centre officially launches the Russian translation of the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting. Following the English, Arabic, and Macedonian version, this is the fourth official language version of the companion handbook to the initial Verification Handbook that was released in 2014.

The Russian version is now made available via the following URL: http://verificationhandbook.com/book2_ru/

The handbook was translated thanks to the partnership and cooperation with the Press Development Institute-Siberia. “The Press Development Institute-Siberia gladly took part in the Russian translation of this handbook about the latest methods and technologies for seeking out and verifying information to be used in investigative journalism. I am sure that this book will provide invaluable assistance to those who read and write in Russian—from professional journalists and civic activists to bloggers and university journalism students. This guide covers the most important points: where and how to search, verify, and convincingly present indisputable proof about legal and human rights violations, wherever they might occur and however they might be hidden from the public.” says Victor Yukechev, the Director of the Press Development Institute-Siberia.

Other translation versions of the Verification Handbook and the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting can be accessed via http://verificationhandbook.com.

About the Press Development Institute-Siberia

The Press Development Institute-Siberia is a Russian non-profit organisation providing services to regional media and NGOs in the field of citizen journalism and public (journalists) investigations.

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For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:
Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

Press Release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Maastricht, 23 November 2016

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is proud to announce the winners of the first round of the Global Health Journalism Grant Programme for Germany.

A combined total of more than €73,000 will be awarded to six journalistic projects that advance reporting on health and health related-topics and bring innovative storytelling on global health issues to a wider public.

The projects that are eligible for funding will be greenlighted upon signature of a legal contract. The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets in Germany such as Süddeutsche Zeitung, Spiegel Online, Stern, ZDF.
The winning projects touch upon a variety of health-issues in developing countries, such as the effects of violence in the overall health of populations in Sierra Leone, Ghana, Colombia and Mexico; the connection between health and violence in times of prolonged war in Sudan; emergency medicine in Haiti; the harmful consequences of a Mongolian health care system that is inequitable, highly bureaucratic and prone to corruption; the struggle to end sexual violence against women in Africa with investigations in the Democratic Republic of the Congo and Ethiopia; the successful eradication of measles in Brazil and Tanzania and the lessons this success holds for Europe where measles are on the rise.

The winners were chosen because of their solid story ideas and their ability to connect the questions raised to German policies and the country’s approaches to problem solving. We rewarded stories that enable readers to understand an issue from a variety of angles. To convey complex health stories in engaging ways, the winning projects will make use of multi-layered web presentations, image galleries, high-definition video and more. In addition, the jury honoured the winners’ strategies to increase the visibility and impact of their stories.

“We hope that our programme can better combine the important issues of global health and quality journalism. The topic deserve innovative and fresh approaches and needs a breakaway from global health reporting stereotypes.”, says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

The winners of this round will join a boot camp training on 11-13 December 2016 in Amsterdam, where they will meet fellow grantees and learn from top-level media practitioners. They will work on the development of their stories, learn about leveraging multimedia storytelling techniques and develop publication strategies aimed at achieving the best possible public impact.

The first call for applications ran between 14 September 2016 and 12 October 2016. These are the winning projects:

Project name: “Health In Times Of War”
Team: Laura Wagenknecht (project lead), Nuba Reports
Description: “Health in times of war” is a multimedia reporting project that sheds light on the three decades long civil war that spread to the Nuba People in Sudan. The project explores this conflict through the lens of a medical outpost run by the German Emergency Doctors. The story will explain the challenges those doctors face and the impact of war on the health of a people.
Project location: Sudan
Media outlet: ZDF
Budget: € 14,973

Project name: “In The Wake Of Violence”
Team: Hanno Charisius (project lead), Astrid Viciano, Christian Weber
Description: This article series explores violence - traditionally regarded as a domain of criminal justice - as a global health issue and takes a close look at the effects of violence in four different countries. The project tells the story of Sierra Leone’s only psychiatrist for a population of 7 million people, Colombia’s struggle with violence in the wake of a long guerrilla war and how in Ghana a long history of violence can genetically affect subsequent generations. In Mexico the reporters will investigate the economic impact of the consequences domestic violence has on women’s health. This project highlights the work of Non-governmental organisations, such as “Ärzte der Welt Deutschland”, (Doctors of the World, German section), which have tackled violence and its impact on societies worldwide and therefore focused most of their work on these very issues.
Media outlet: Süddeutsche Zeitung
Budget: € 10,000

Project name: “Emergency Medicine In Haiti”
Team: Alexis Ward (project lead)
Description: After Hurricane “Matthew”, the enormous challenges faced by Haiti’s emergency medical system have become evident. Current efforts to improve the situation are less widely known. This reporting series for TV and online outlets explores how news coverage tends to ignore the underlying reasons for critical health problems and shows how Haitians are confronting them. Germany’s government currently chairs the “Platform on Disaster Displacement”. This reporting project examines how the current developments in emergency medicine in Haiti resonate in the larger global context, in which Germany occupies a leading role.
Project location: Haiti
Media outlets: Spiegel Online, WeltN24
Budget: € 15,950

Project name: “Mongolia - A Tooth For A Tooth”
Team: Malte Werner (Project lead)
Description: Health care is an universal right in Mongolia but the health care system is - despite progress in the past decades - inequitable, highly bureaucratic and prone to corruption. Insanitary dental procedures are one reason for a high rate of hepatitis infections. This story follows a group of German dentists who provide free treatment in the most remote areas of Mongolia and lays out the challenges especially their youngest patients face as a result of malnutrition.
Project location: Mongolia
Media outlet: Stern magazine
Budget: € 12.452 Euros

Project name: “Fistula: A life In Shame”
Team: Andrea Jeska (project lead)
Description: Millions of women in Africa are suffering from vesicovaginal or rectovaginal fistula mostly because they have no access to appropriate health care or are victims of rape as a weapon of war. Fistula is a disease that confines women to a life in shame and isolation. This series of multimedia pieces sets out to investigate the major causes and consequences of not having access to maternal health care and analyses the reasons for the hidden epidemic of fistula in two countries: Ethiopia and the Democratic Republic of the Congo. Victims, local doctors, and midwives tell their stories. Various reports investigate the efforts of the German government to strengthen self-determined family planning and maternal health as part of a global UN-programme and takes a close look at how German doctors and NGOs fight early pregnancies, sexual violence and try to alleviate the devastating consequences of fistula.
Project locations: Democratic Republic of the Congo, Ethiopia
Media outlet: Stern magazine
Budget: € 10,530

Project name: “Measles Eradication – What Europe Has To Learn From Other Continents”
Team: Josephin Mosch (project lead)
Description: Mass immunisation campaigns have been successful in eradicating measles entirely. South American countries like Brazil and even African countries like Tanzania reach a high percentage of the population with the first vaccination shot. European countries are much less successful in their immunisation campaigns against measles. The project also looks at several historical and political factors that contribute to the current situation in Germany where measles vaccination is not mandatory at the moment.
Project locations: Brazil, Tanzania, Germany
Media outlet: Bayerischer Rundfunk
Budget: € 10,000

Journalists interested in conducting extensive research and reporting on global health issues and their relations to German health policies are encouraged to pitch us their creative ideas in the upcoming second round of applications.

The deadline to apply is 29 March 2017 (22:00 CET). The online application form can be found here.

For questions, check the FAQs or send an email to healthreporting@journalismgrants.org.

Note to editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the programme granted funding to 100 projects.

In 2015 the EJC launched a special edition of the IDR grant programme aimed at supporting long term global development coverage. Four major European news organisations (Spiegel Online, Welt/N24, Dagens Nyheter, De Correspondent) were each awarded grants worth €150.000.

In 2016 the EJC launched another special edition: the “Global Health Journalism Grant Programme for Germany”. This edition aims to advance a better coverage of international health, health policy and development related issues by supporting the production of stories that have a strong impact on media audiences in Germany. The programme will continue throughout 2017 with several rounds of application.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

Website: www.Journalistenstipendien.org
Email: healthreporting@journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Maastricht, 17 November 2016

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is proud to announce the winners of the eighth round of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme. A combined total of more than €245,000 will be awarded to thirteen journalistic projects that advance development reporting and bring innovative storytelling on global development to a wider public.

The final winners were selected during a meeting of the IDR Grant Programme Advisory Council, consisting of senior international journalists. The projects that are eligible for funding will be greenlighted upon signature of a legal contract.

The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets located in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Sweden, the United Kingdom and many other countries. The winning projects touch upon multiple development issues, such as challenges faced by children in Central African Republic; European development funds spent on migration programmes in Africa; the impact of “low-fee” schools in Africa; the large-scale use of drones in Africa; the role of women garment workers in the economic and social stability of Bangladesh.

The winners were chosen because of their solid story ideas and innovative multi-platform approaches, operating on the crossroads between investigative, data-driven and visual journalism. To convey complex development stories in engaging ways, the winning projects will make use of web-documentaries, graphic journalism, 360 degrees videos, virtual reality, etc. In addition, the Advisory Council applauded the synergy between the proposed formats of many applicants, as this strengthens the impact of their stories on the audience.

The winners will join a boot camp training on 11-13 December, in Amsterdam, the Netherlands, where they will meet fellow grantees and learn from top-level media practitioners. They will work on the development of their stories, learn about leveraging multimedia storytelling techniques and develop publication strategies aimed at achieving the best possible public impact. As part of the programme, the winners will also attend the News Impact Summit “Emotions and Digital Storytelling” organised by the European Journalism Centre in cooperation with the Google News Lab.

The eighth call for applications ran between 3 March 2016 and 7 September 2016. In total, 166 applications were received.

These are the winning projects:

Project name: Drawing Lines
Team: Marc Ellison (Project lead), Didier Kassai
Description: “Drawing Lines” is a participatory graphic novel, and 360 video, reporting the challenges faced by children in the under-developed Central African Republic.
Project locations: Central African Republic
Media outlets: BBC (UK), RFI (FR), Radio Ndeke Luka (Central African Republic)
Budget: €19.100

Project name: Bananapocalypse
Team: Mara Simperler (Project lead), Lukas Wagner
Description: This project investigates the disease management in the banana production and the impact of these diseases on consumers and on farmers in Ecuador and Philippines.
Project locations: Ecuador, Philippines
Media outlets: Berliner Morgenpost (DE), La Stampa (IT), Fria Tidningar (Sweden), Neue Zürcher Zeitung - NZZ (Switzerland), Terra Mater (Austria), GkillCity (Ecuador)
Budget: €16.810

Project name: Africa’s Great Lakes In The Balance
Team: Benedict Moran (Project lead)
Description: This multimedia project examines the problems and the solutions of the regional management of Africa’s Great Lakes basin.
Project locations: Kenya, Tanzania
Media outlets: France24 (FR), RFI (FR), IRIN (Kenya)
Budget: €20.000

Project name: The World’s Penicillin Problem
Team: Keila Guimaraes (Project lead), Ashley Kirk
Description: This project reveals the causes and consequences of a worldwide penicillin shortage and examines the future for those who need this life-saving drug.
Project locations: India, Brazil, South Africa, UK
Media outlets: El Mundo (Spain), The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (UK), Al Jazeera English (International), Quartz (International), Folha de S. Paulo (Brazil)
Budget: €20.000

Project name: Shared Horizons
Team: Jacopo Pasotti (Project lead), Ross Ziegelmeier, Alessandro D’Alfonso
Description: Shared horizons shows the similar ability of the Mongolian cattle herders communities and the fishermen local groups in Madagascar to adapt to environmental and socio-economic changes.
Project locations: Mongolia, Madagascar
Media outlets:  La Repubblica (IT), Deutsche Welle (DE), EFE Verde (Spain), Krautreporter (DE), National Geographic (Global), Radiotelevisione svizzera - RSI (Switzerland)
Budget: €19.850

Project name: Diverted Aid
Team: Ludovica Jona Lasinio (Project lead), Andrea De Georgio, Mario Poeta, Sara Prestianni, Razak Idrissa, Joshua Massarenti, Mariangela Paone, Alessio Fabrizi. With a contribution of Linda Polman.
Description: This multimedia web documentary reports on how a part of European development funds is being spent for programmes aimed at managing migration flows in Africa.
Project locations: Niger, Mali
Media outlets: La Stampa (IT), El Diario (Spain), Mediapart (FR), De Groene Amsterdammer (NL)
Budget: €20.000

Project name: East African Trucker – A Bumpy Road To Progress
Team: Sune Gudmundsson (Project lead), Sven Johannesen, Lasse Wamsler
Description: This project sheds light on the struggle for and the promise of East African prosperity seen through the eyes of a trucker.
Project locations: Uganda, Kenya
Media outlets: Politiken (DK), Al Jazeera English (International), MO* (BE)
Budget: €20.000

Project name: Schools For Profit
Team: Benoit Cros (Project lead)
Description: Schools for profit investigates on the business of “low-fee” schools in Africa and its impacts on the right to education.
Project locations: Liberia, Ghana, Kenya, Uganda
Media outlets: Le Monde Afrique (FR), Der Spiegel (DE), Internazionale (IT), eldiario.es (Spain), De Correspondent (NL), El Diari de l’Educació (Spain), VICE (UK)
Budget: €19.950

Project name: On The Front Line In The Fight For Women’s Rights
Team: Rossalyn Warren (Project lead)
Description: This project explores how women in three remote corners of the world are pushing forward a global call for gender equality.
Project locations: Burundi, Tanzania, Mexico, El Salvador, Pakistan
Media outlets: Channel 4 News (UK), Public Radio International (PRI) (UK), The Independent (UK)
Budget: € 20.000

Project name: Missing Food
Team: Laura Aragó Navarro (Project lead), Carles Villalonga, Xavier Aldekoa, Daniela Quirós
Description: “Missing Food” carries on a data and cross-border investigation about the nutrition and food loss in Sub-Saharan Africa.
Project locations: Nigeria, Malawi, Mozambique
Media outlets: La Vanguardia (Spain), Le Monde Afrique (FR), Bayerischer Rundfunk (DE), Libération (FR)
Budget: € 20.000

Project name: The Next Big Thing?
Team: Dirk Gilson (Project lead)
Description: This documentary investigates if large-scale use of drones could save lives and environment in Africa.
Project locations: Malawi, Rwanda, Tanzania
Media outlets: WDR TV/Online (DE), WDR Radio (DE), Al Jazeera English (International)
Budget: € 19.220

Project name: Sewing Societies – The Garment Workers of Bangladesh
Team: Paul Myles (Project lead), Davide Morandini
Description: Through the stories of female garment industry workers in Bangladesh, this project looks into the fundamental role these women play in the economic and social stability of the country.
Project locations: Bangladesh
Media outlets: Channel 4 News (UK), Le Parisien (FR), Internazionale (IT), De Correspondent (NL)
Budget: € 19.640

Project name: Task Shifting, An Innovative Approach To Save Lives
Team: Sara Assarsson (Project lead)
Description: This project highlights various initiatives to tackle gender inequality, improve women’s health and reduce maternal mortality in three African countries.
Project locations: Mozambique, Malawi, Uganda
Media outlets: Dagens Nyheter (Sweden)
Budget: € 12.340

In 2017-2018, the EJC will award over €1.6 million in funding for innovative development journalism projects. To this end, the EJC will run another special funding round for media outlets as well as four calls for applications centred on specific international development topics.

Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes are encouraged to pitch us their creative ideas in the upcoming ninth round of applications.

The deadline to apply is 15 February 2017 (22:00 CET). Applications are accepted on issues related to gender equality (SDG5).

Interested journalists can pitch story ideas free of charge at this online application form.

Funding will be up to €20.000 per grant and will cover direct expenses for journalistic research and study trips, possible technical costs for crews and equipment, data acquisition and analysis, visualisation, etc. Interested candidates may apply for full or partial grants, excluding, however, salaries of permanent staff. More detailed information on the application procedure, deadlines, and the aims of the project can be found at www.journalismgrants.org.

For a showcase of previously awarded grants, see our portfolio. For any questions, check our FAQs or contact us at info@journalismgrants.org.

—-

Note to editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the programme granted funding to 100 projects.

In 2015 the EJC launched a special edition of the IDR grant programme aimed at supporting long term global development coverage. Four major European news organisations (Spiegel Online, Welt/N24, Dagens Nyheter, De Correspondent) were each awarded grants worth €150.000.

In 2016 the EJC launched another special edition: the “Global Health Journalism Grant Programme for Germany”. This edition aims to advance a better coverage of international health, health policy and development related issues by supporting the production of stories that have a strong impact on media audiences in Germany.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,848,000 for the period of 2017 and 2018 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centred on global development topics. In 2017 the programme will run two rounds of applications and organise two boot camp style trainings tailor-made for the winners of each round.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Maastricht, 10 November 2016

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce a new round of over €1.6 million in funding for innovative development journalism projects that will be awarded in 2017-2018 via its Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) grant programme. The funding is part of a two-year extension of the grant programme that the EJC has secured from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation.

Over the next two years, the grant programme will continue to award financial support to journalists and media houses alike with the aim of developing experimental and compelling storytelling on topics related to the United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs). The funded projects must also address issues in one or more of the world’s Least Developed Countries (LCDs) and/or the key European donor countries’ development relations with LDCs.

“With our grants we want to contribute to keeping the sustainable development goals and the challenges that come with implementing them on the public agenda. We are very fortunate, and proud, to be able to continue to support the international journalism community in their innovative storytelling approaches. We would like to thank all the journalists who have so far contributed to the success of the programme, and, moreover, would like to thank the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation for its continued trust and support.”, said EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

Eligible for applications are journalists and media outlets targeting mainstream audiences in at least one of Europe’s top five Official Development Assistance donor countries in absolute terms: France, Germany, the Netherlands, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Secondary outlets may cater to any other European country, while publications outside Europe are most welcome for supplemental dissemination.

Over the coming two years, the EJC will run another special funding round for media outlets as well as four topical calls for applications centred on a varied selection of international development topics.

The first deadline to submit an application is 15 February 2017. Applications will be accepted on issues related to gender equality (SDG5).

Interested journalists can pitch story ideas free of charge at this online application form. Award decisions, based on journalistic quality and merit, will be taken in complete editorial independence from the Gates Foundation.

Funding will cover direct expenses for journalistic research and study trips, possible technical costs for crews and equipment, data acquisition and analysis, visualisation, etc. Interested candidates may apply for full or partial grants, excluding, however, salaries of permanent staff. More detailed information on the application procedure, deadlines, and the aims of the project can be found at www.journalismgrants.org.

For a showcase of previously awarded grants, see our portfolio. For any questions, check our FAQs or contact us at info@journalismgrants.org.

—-

Note to editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the programme granted funding to 100 projects.

In 2015 the EJC launched a special edition of the IDR grant programme aimed at supporting long term global development coverage. Four major European news organisations (Spiegel Online, Welt/N24, Dagens Nyheter, De Correspondent) were each awarded grants worth €150.000.

In 2016 the EJC launched another special edition: the “Global Health Journalism Grant Programme for Germany”. This edition aims to advance a better coverage of international health, health policy and development related issues by supporting the production of stories that have a strong impact on media audiences in Germany.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,848,000 for the period of 2017 and 2018 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centred on global development topics. In 2017 the programme will run two rounds of applications and organise two boot camp style trainings tailor-made for the winners of each round.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Email: info@journalismgrants.org

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
26 October, 2016

The European Journalism Centre and the Media Development Centre in Skopje, Macedonia officially announce the release of the Macedonian translation of the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting. Following the English and Arabic language version, this is the third official language version of the companion handbook to the initial Verification Handbook that was released in 2014.

The Macedonian version is now made available via the following URL: http://verificationhandbook.com/book2_mk/index.php

“The Media Development Centre is organization dedicated, among other things, to the raising of professional standards of media operation and journalism. At this moment, those professional standards seem to be lacking in the operations of huge majority of Macedonian media, especially the internet native operations - various news sites and portals. We saw the translation of this Handbook as an opportunity to contribute both to ongoing debate about the state and future of journalism and to everyday practices of Macedonian media and journalists, investigative reporters and regular beat reporters likewise”, states Dejan Georgievski, President of the Media Development Centre.

Other translation versions of the Verification Handbook and the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting can be accessed via http://verificationhandbook.com.

About the Media Development Centre

The Media Development Center (MDC) is dedicated to the creation of a climate conducive to sustainable and democratic environment for further development of the media and the civil society in general. The Media Development Center is one of the organisations-successors of the Macedonian Press Center. After the secession from the Macedonian Press Center, MDC took over its legal programme and the issues in the area of media policies. Since its founding, MDC works on analyses of media legislation in the Republic of Macedonia and provides legal assistance for journalists and media, with its own team of lawyers. The Media Development Center is registered at the Central Registry as an association of citizens.

—-

For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:
Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
25 July, 2016

The European Journalism Centre and the Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Center in Doha, Qatar officially announce the release of the website version of the Arabic translation of the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting. The translated version was produced with the financial and editorial support of the Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Center, with an aim of producing a free resource that media professionals and journalism students in the Arab world can access for better verification of user-generated content in their journalistic research. The project was also made possible with a translation effort by Meedan, a non-profit based in San Francisco, California. This is the first official translation of this edition of the handbook since the release in 2015.

The Arabic version is now made available via the following URL:

Website: http://verificationhandbook.com/book2_ar/
PDF: http://verificationhandbook.com/book2_ar/handbook2.arabic.pdf

The European Journalism Centre has also partnered with the Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Center to co-organise the News Impact Summit Doha, an initiative powered by the Google News Lab. At the summit, the organisations officially launched the print edition of the handbook and handed out the copies to the participants of this event. This handbook is planned to be used for training programmes in the MENA region, and other versions will be made available on the site at a later stage.

About the Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Centre

The Al Jazeera Media Training and Development Centre was launched on February 24, 2004. The Centre offers professional training courses and reliable consultancy services to media organisations, students and professionals, including Al Jazeera Media Network’s staff, in accordance with the latest professional and technical standards. It is also responsible of developing strategies to translate Al Jazeera Media Network expertise into transferable knowledge, so that media amateurs and professionals worldwide can benefit from it.

About Meedan

Meedan is a social technology company that builds digital tools for global journalism and translation, conducts research on journalism best practices on social media, and leads trainings around the world on collaborative journalism and media verification. Meedan’s Checkdesk is an award-winning open source platform for newsrooms to investigate, analyse and contextualise user-generated content, and to track the credibility and trustworthiness of social media accounts. Meedan is a founding member of First Draft, a coalition of experts sharing best practices and training in how to discover, verify and publish eyewitness media for news. Meedan has translated both editions of the Verification Handbook into Arabic.

—-

For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:
Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
12 July 2016

The European Journalism Centre is pleased to announce Adam Thomas as its new Director. Thomas will fill the role vacated by departing Director Wilfried Ruetten, who has held the position since 2006. Adam Thomas brings experience of start-ups, traditional media industry and media development from both the private and non-profit sectors from his previous roles at Storyful and Sourcefabric.

“By choosing Adam Thomas as the new Director, the EJC wants to send a message,” said Vicent Partal, EJC Board Chair. “In the coming years we will dig deeper still into the most important questions journalism faces today. Adam has experience in developing some of the most successful projects in new journalism that we have seen in Europe. He is an asset that will help our organization to become a lighthouse for all those interested in innovation, in ethics, and in technology. The EJC plays a major role in helping our colleagues throughout the world to understand the changing scenario of the news business. We must preserve the best traditions of journalism in order to serve our communities and fulfill the role media must play in a complex world. Adam’s leadership will be crucial to achieving these objectives.”

“The Board wishes to express its sincere and profound appreciation of Mr. Ruetten’s achievements since he took office in 2006. It is thanks to him that the EJC has successfully tackled the last decade’s changes in the journalism ecosystem and innovated its approaches, offers, and initiatives in response to the online environment. The foundation has weathered this transition with flying colours and proactively adapted new tools, developed new partnerships, and acquired new audiences in the process. Under Mr. Ruetten’s guidance, the EJC has become one of the most important supporters of quality journalism in Europe through up-to-date training, grant programmes, and accompanying activities.”

Mr. Thomas will start as Director effective January 1st 2017. He will move to Maastricht in November 2016 to work with Mr Rütten on the transition.

“I’m delighted to join the EJC,” Thomas said. “Technology is transforming media consumption, delivery, partnerships, ethics and experimentation. Through projects like the News Impact Summits, the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme, Data Driven Journalism, and the Verification Handbook, the EJC has changed the way journalists work. I believe the EJC is now perfectly positioned to ensure the independence and importance of journalism with a new era of invention and profitability. The Board and I share a vision that places the EJC at the heart of the innovation and debate around journalism, ethics, and technology globally.”

About Adam Thomas

Adam Thomas is an award-winning journalism and technology leader. In his previous role as Chief Product Officer at Storyful, he was responsible for the vision and delivery of over 20 innovative journalism products to 150 of the world’s biggest media organisations. Adam joined Storyful in July 2013 as director of Business Development. The company was acquired by News Corp in December 2013, and has grown from 27 people to over 120 in New York, Hong Kong, London, Sydney and Dublin.

Previously, he was Head of Communications at the international nonprofit Sourcefabric, where he managed communications strategy and community growth. Adam has worked on media development projects in over 50 countries worldwide. His teams and projects have won an INMA Global Innovation Award, the African News Innovation Challenge, a Guardian Digital Innovation Award (Best Technology for Social Change) and a Knight-Batten Innovations in Journalism Award. He tweets at @datatheism.

About The European Journalism Centre (EJC)
The European Journalism Centre (EJC), established in 1992, is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: on the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

 

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
June 28, 2016

On 28 June 2016, the European Journalism Centre released an Italian translation of the Verification Handbook. The translated version was produced in an effort led by Andrea Coccia of Slow News, and edited by Bernardo Parrella. This is the ninth official translation since the release of the Verification Handbook in 2014.

The Italian version is now made available via the following URLs:

The European Journalism Centre has also partnered with DIG Awards where it carried out its workshop on verification basics at the DIG Festival which took place on 23-26 June 2016.

Other translations made available include Spanish, Arabic, Portuguese, French, Greek, Turkish Ukrainian, and Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian (BSC). For more information, sign up for the newsletter via http://verificationhandbook.com/ for updates.

About Slow News

Slow News is an online-based resource platform and an association for professional journalists in Italy. For more about its service and activities, please visit: http://www.slow-news.com/

—-
For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:

Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

Press release

The European Journalism Centre

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

Maastricht, 10 May 2016

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is proud to announce the winners of the seventh round of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme. A combined total of more than €260,000 will be awarded to fourteen journalistic projects that advance development reporting and bring innovative storytelling on global development to a wider public.

The final winners were selected during a meeting of the IDR Grant Programme Advisory Council, consisting of senior international journalists. The projects that are eligible for funding will be greenlighted upon signature of a legal contract.

The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets located in France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom and many other countries. The winning projects touch upon multiple development issues, such as water grabbing; ship breaking, its human costs and its consequences on nature; South-South cooperation; the repercussions of the decrease of the bee population on the food system; and the fight against poverty and social exclusion among elderly people in Tanzania and Ethiopia.

The winners were chosen because of their solid story ideas and innovative multi-platform approaches, operating on the crossroads between investigative, data-driven and visual journalism. To convey complex development stories in engaging ways, the winning projects will make use of web-documentaries, graphic journalism, gamification elements, 360 degrees videos, virtual reality, etc. In addition, the advisory council applauded the multi-platform approach of many applicants, as this magnifies the visibility and impact of their stories.

“With this grant round we have reached the milestone of one hundred funded projects. It’s rewarding to see that, beyond the growing numbers, our grantees have shown visible progress on the quality and innovation level of their stories and have been achieving an ever widening impact,” says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

The winners of this round will join a two-day boot camp training on 9 and 10 June, in Maastricht, the Netherlands, where they will meet fellow grantees and learn from top-level media practitioners. They will work on the development of their stories, learn about leveraging multimedia storytelling techniques and develop publication strategies aimed at achieving the best possible public impact.

The seventh call for applications ran between 10 September 2015 and 2 March 2016. In total, 199 applications were received.

You can find the winning projects here.

Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes are encouraged to pitch us their creative ideas in the upcoming eighth round of applications. The deadline to apply is 7 September 2016 (22:00 CET). The online application form can be found here. For questions, check the FAQ guide or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013, the programme has granted funding to 100 projects.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centred on global development topics.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: on the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

Email: info@journalismgrants.org

Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Press release

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
3 March 2016

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce that it has received 199 applications in the seventh round of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme.

Over the next four weeks, the EJC will evaluate the entries and inform all applicants of the status of their application(s). Due to the large number of submissions, we will however not be able to give individual feedback to unsuccessful candidates. Shortlisted applicants will then have one month’s time to submit a complete proposal and provide any necessary supporting documents. The grant winners will be announced mid May 2016.

“Over the past years we’ve seen extraordinary journalistic work being produced by freelance journalists and European media houses alike with the support of our grant programme. We are confident this round will again surprise us with original stories and innovative formats and we’re looking forward to further supporting outstanding reporting on global development topics”, says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

Interested journalists, who did not get around to pitching their development reporting ideas in time, can submit applications in the next round. The next deadline is 7 September 2016 (22:00 CET). Innovative pitches can be submitted via the online application form.

For a showcase of previously awarded grants, see our portfolio and all projects published in 2015.. For any questions, contact us at info@journalismgrants.org.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the programme granted funding to 82 projects.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centered on global development topics.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

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Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.


Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
15 February 2016

The European Journalism Centre announces a new 2016 series of nine News Impact Summits, free-of-charge media innovation events, powered by the Google News Lab. The summit series builds on its successful 2015 editions by revisiting some of the European capitals from last year, whilst covering new locations in Europe and for the first time the Middle East.

Since its pilot event in Vienna, the series has visited nine European cities, and established a network of 2300+ editors, journalists, newsroom managers and J-school students all across Europe. This year’s series will also cover new topics in the domain of digital journalism including but not limited to digital storytelling, interactives, newsgathering, verification, VR and AR.
In the first half of the year, there will be five summits in the following cities and dates;

Locations and dates for the second half of the year will be announced at a later stage.

  • Milan, Italy (Friday 4 March)
  • Madrid, Spain (Monday 25 April)
  • London, UK (Thursday, 12 May)
  • Doha, Qatar (Monday, 30 May)
  • Berlin, Germany (Friday, 1 July)

The registration for the summits will be open at newsimpact.io. In order to receive updates, subscribe our News Impact Summit newsletter here.

Website: http://newsimpact.io
Registration: http://n.newsimpact.io/registration
Contact: info@newsimpact.io

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The European Journalism Centre

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is an independent, international, non-profit foundation dedicated to the highest standards in journalism. We enable and sustain quality journalism and information as a public service through a variety of activities, both in the non-profit and service sectors. We create and support networks among media professionals within Europe and with other parts of the world. Each year, the Centre hosts hundreds of journalists in seminars and study trips, exploring European policies as well as a variety of other topics dealing with innovation and new developments in the media landscape. The EJC plays a unique role at the European and international level as a partner and organiser for media companies, professional organisations, journalism schools and governmental bodies seeking to establish activities and projects. We work, inter alia, with the European institutions, Google News Lab, the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, the Dutch Foreign Ministry, the World Bank and the Open Society Foundations.

Google News Lab

The Google News Lab empowers the creation of media that improves people’s lives. Our mission is to collaborate with journalists and entrepreneurs everywhere to build the future of media with Google. We do this through product partnerships, media trainings, and programs that foster the development of the news industry as a whole.

Project:
News Impact Summit
The News Impact Summits are a new type of media innovation event, organised by the European Journalism Centre (EJC) in cooperation with the News Lab at Google, focusing on how recently developed approaches and tools can significantly change the way we work in the newsroom, the way we tell stories, and the way we engage audiences and society as a whole.

Press release

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


Maastricht, 15 January 2016

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is proud to announce that Jacopo Ottaviani and Isacco Chiaf, grantees of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme, have won the 2015 edition of the reputable Lorenzo Natali Media Prize of the European Commission, in the category Professional Journalism, the Arab World and the Middle East.

According to Caroline Giraud, Grand Jury Member, Global Forum for Media Development: “The piece has the potential to be empowering because it will make European viewers think about what they do with their waste. It portrays a good mix of issues including environment, health and development.”

The Prize winners have been awarded during a prestigious Awards Ceremony that took place on 14 January 2016 in Brussels. EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten accepted the award in the name of Jacopo Ottaviani and read the following message on his behalf:

“I warmly thank the Lorenzo Natali Media Prize jury and the European Commission for this award. We are honored to appear among the best journalists in the world with “E-waste Republic”, a long form reportage that focuses on problems and solutions connecting data and on the ground evidences. I also warmly thank the EJC without which this project wouldn’t be possible.”

On his side, Wilfried Ruetten mentioned the following:

“We are extremely proud that Jacopo Ottaviani and Isacco Chiaf have been recognised with such a prestigious award for their work on development storytelling. This award is a result of the passion and commitment of two very dedicated professionals: a freelance journalist and a freelance graphic designer. This team composition highlights the importance of cross-disciplinary cooperation between journalists and technologists in creating powerful visual storytelling meant to inspire and create a public impact. With “E-waste Republic”, the team managed to produce innovative reporting that operates on the crossroads between investigative, constructive and visual journalism. We are very happy to having been able to support the team with a reporting grant. In 2016 we will continue supporting development journalism through EJC’s Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme.”

(c) European Commission
(c) European Commission

The multimedia project “E-waste Republic” has been developed by freelance data journalist Jacopo Ottaviani and freelance graphic designer Isacco Chiaf with the support of a €16.000 reporting grant from the EJC. The project has been developed as an immersive, constructive, multilingual data-driven storytelling on electronic waste and has been published in 2015 by Internazionale, Al Jazeera English, One World. The “E-waste Republic” project aims to achieve multiple goals: to raise awareness about e-waste, to provide concrete solutions that reduce e-waste, to increase recycling and also to create jobs, to bind data with reality and human stories and to connect evidences to a global view of the phenomenon.

Jacopo Ottaviani is a three-times winner of the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme. Other projects of his include “Investigation of Land Grabbing in Africa” and the upcoming “Lungs of the Earth”, which will produce a data-driven story on forests, deforestation and reforestation in the world.

Isacco Chiaf has participated as a team member in many winning projects of the IDR Grant Programme. He developed the graphic and web design as well as video and photography on such projects as “Fish for Cheap”, “Invisible Killer”, etc.

Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes are encouraged to pitch EJC their creative ideas in the seventh round of applications. The deadline to apply is 2 March 2016 (22:00 CET). For questions, check the FAQ guide or send an email to: info@journalismgrants.org.

The Lorenzo Natali Media Prize is organised by the European Commission’s Directorate-General for International Cooperation and Development since 1992 and honours journalists from across the world for their outstanding reporting on issues related to development and poverty eradication. The 2015 edition of the ‘Lorenzo Natali Media Prize’ was launched under the motto “Today’s stories can change our tomorrow” as part of the 2015 European Year for Development.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013, the programme has granted funding to 82 projects.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centered on global development topics. In 2016, the programme will run two rounds of applications and organise two boot camp style trainings tailor-made for the winners of each round.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

“Development journalism in Africa has often been labeled as boring, too positive, and even abstract. It is a world away from the popular journalistic mantra “if it bleeds it leads” according to former BBC Africa journalist Joseph Warungu, whose Nairobi-based organization AfricaonAir spearheads development journalism training in Kenya. Warungu is co-editor of the European Journalism Centre’s (EJC) new publication Reporting Development: A Guide for African Journalists.”

Read the full article here.

Project:
Kenya: Raising Development Awareness Through the Media
The lack of in-depth, well-researched, and effective reporting on development issues in Kenya is weakening the media’s capacity to have an impact on the country’s political processes. EJC’s Kenya programme seeks to raise awareness to this problem, offering workshops dedicated to developing practical solutions by promoting relevant, powerful, and effective journalistic storytelling.

Press release

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE


24 November 2015

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is delighted to announce the winners of the special funding round for European media launched as part of its Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme. A combined total of €600.000 will be awarded to Dagens Nyheter (Sweden), De Correspondent (the Netherlands), SPIEGEL ONLINE (Germany) and WeltN24 (Germany) with the aim to support one-year-long innovative storytelling on global development.

The four winning media outlets have been selected out of 44 proposals received from major European media outlets in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

The winners were selected for their innovative approaches to covering Sustainable Development Goals (SDGs), combining traditional journalism with new and experimental storytelling techniques, alongside with the outlets’ high online impact potential.

“We faced the most difficult choice so far when it comes to selecting the winners of our grant programme. This special round yielded an overwhelming number of high quality applications from well-established European media houses. We are absolutely delighted to be able to support long-term development journalism at top level media outlets. We are convinced that this can create the necessary awareness, including within the media itself, of the viability of quality journalism on international development topics,” said Wilfried Ruetten, EJC Director.

Peter Wolodarski, editor-in-chief of Sweden’s Dagens Nyheter, stated: “We’re very excited about this project. The development goals are underreported, generally speaking, and we want to do more in this field. With this grant we will be able to boost our reporting, invest in digital development, and engage our audience even more. Our team has a lot of great ideas that will now be turned into reality.”

The managing editor of De Correspondent Karel Smouter mentioned: “We invest our resources – provided by 40.000 paying members – in producing stories that last longer than a day, week, month or even a year. But, how do we make readers aware that these stories exist and still have relevance? This grant enables our designers, developers, journalists and translators to come up with new ways to engage the audience with our stories, taking them – step by step – on our learning journey in the world of the UN and the Global Goals.”

Florian Harms, editor-in-chief of SPIEGEL ONLINE, said: “Being chosen as a recipient of the European Journalism Centre Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme is an honour for SPIEGEL ONLINE. The United Nations aim high with their Sustainable Development Goals and the extent to which these goals will be met is crucial to the living conditions of billions of people. We are convinced that finding suitable ways of explaining and communicating the SDGs is both a challenge for news offices and a prerequisite for achieving the goals. Our data journalism unit will be occupied with developing innovative and experimental storytelling approaches and we’re truly looking forward to covering this topic in a positive, engaging way.”

Jan-Eric Peters, editor-in-chief of WeltN24, the media group publishing Die Welt, Welt am Sonntag and N24, stated: “We are very excited to be supported by the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme. It is a great opportunity for WeltN24 to develop a new multimedia format and highlight an important topic that is underrepresented in our everyday coverage. What is particularly exciting for us is that this is not only a short-term engagement but actually a one-year-project that helps keeping the focus on water as a basic and much needed element.”

Dagens Nyheter and dn.se will focus its year-long reporting on all aspects related to the Global Goal 17, which covers revitalising the global partnership for sustainable development. Rather than tackling individual goals, this focused approach will allow an in-depth look into all the actors involved in Global Goals, their responsibilities and the underlying systemic issues. Using SDG 17 as a starting point, the reporting will reflect stories about how global development work is conducted on an overall level as well as on daily basis at the grassroots level.

De Correspondent will launch an online crash course on the Global Goals. The crash course will give an insight in world politics, taking readers step ­by ­step through an ever­ growing collection of stories on how the world seeks to address its biggest problems. The course will create an online ‘learning environment’ with a number of tools that enable the public to become more engaged and better informed citizens. The platform will have as core focus the creation of a better learning experience, including advanced infographics, online video and interactive design built in an audience friendly way.

Spiegel Online will deliver a platform centred on the ideals of constructive journalism and data literacy. The main question in focus will be: “which options does each individual have to support the sustainable development goals?” Readers will be addressed personally through data-driven elements, interactive tools and multimedia reports in order to provide answers and new perspectives on this issue. Spiegel Online will design a mono-thematic dashboard publicly available on www.spiegel.de, which will dive deeply into the sustainable development goals’ statistical basis, so hard-to-grasp data can be easily interpreted.

WeltN24’s project “Can I get some water?” will shine light on the global importance of this natural resource, put it in a worldwide context and provide a fresh take on the challenges and potential solutions of the UN Sustainable Development Goals on water issues. An interactive multimedia microsite will allow users to discover the topic of water from unexpected angles. Readers can expect at least 20 reports from different regions of the world told through animated videos, interactive graphics, maps, 360-­degree videos and drone flights. Multimedia ‘scrollytelling’, compatible with tablets and smartphones, will be used alongside reflective, classic, long-read reports.

The four winning projects that are eligible for funding will be greenlighted upon signature of a legal contract. All funded projects will be freely accessible to a national or global online audience without any access barriers such as paywalls or registration.

The four winners of this special call as well as the 15 winners of the IDR regular call will join a two-day boot camp training on 10 and 11 December. The event brings together fellow grantees in an environment meant to generate cross disciplinary and cross country collaborations. The bootcamp will allow for the exchange of best practices around publications strategies aimed at achieving the best possible public impact.

Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes are encouraged to pitch their creative ideas in the seventh round of applications. The deadline to apply is 2 March 2016 (22:00 CET). The online application form can be found here. For questions, check the FAQ guide or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013, the programme has granted funding to 82 projects.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centered on global development topics. In 2016, the programme will again run two rounds of applications and organise two boot camp style trainings tailor-made for the winners of each round.

The IDR Special Edition was launched on 23 September 2015 and ran until 2 November 2015. The Special Edition aims to support coverage of selected United Nation’s Sustainable Development Goals in a regular rhythm over the course of one year. The call is aimed at publishers, major news outlets, and high impact online publishing houses from Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

EJC and Kenyan Partner Release Development Reporting Guide for African Journalists
For Immediate Release
24 November 2015 15hCET

Maastricht, the Netherlands - The European Journalism Centre together with Nairobi-based AfricaonAir has released Reporting Development: A Guide for African Journalists, a new publication and resource tailored for media professionals in Africa.

Originally authored by veteran Reuters journalist Oliver Wates, this new version of Reporting Development maintains the original guide’s practical focus on time-honored techniques for producing top quality high-impact development reportages, while heavily localizing for the particular contexts and constraints that many African journalists face regularly.

Edited by AfricaonAir director Joseph Warungu and EJC’s Josh LaPorte and co-authored by former Agence France Press reporter Hamadou Tidiane Sy of Senegal, the Guide aims to act as a key and timely resource at the Pan-African level. Reporting Development includes new sections dedicated to the role of data in development reporting as well as references to the 17 recently agreed United Nations Strategic Development Goals (SDGs).

“Development issues can seem boring and flat but they can create a huge impact in society if turned into lively and robust stories expertly and skillfully told by creative journalists. This handbook explains how,” says Warungu in the foreword.

Reporting Development is broken down into three narrative chapters. The first, “Development As News” introduces journalists to issues of development and stresses the importance and impact of development reporting on society.

The second component titled “Issues”, addresses from a journalistic perspective, current topics and opportunities facing Africa such as climate change, land reform, ICT/telecoms, and infrastructure as well as traditional development themes such as education, health, gender, and agriculture. The third and final one, entitled “How Development Aid Works” discusses the organisations that work to promote the development of nations and how journalists can relate to them.

Reporting Development: A Guide for African Journalists and its release are part of EJC’s multi-year commitment to media development in Kenya, an important component of which includes increasing the local media’s capacity for societal impact.

“The role media can play in bringing visibility to development issues is vital”, says EJC Kenya country manager Josh LaPorte. “Decision-makers, civil society’s agents of change and the public at large, can be strongly influenced and pressured by timely, hard-hitting, compelling and factual development reporting.”

An online version of Reporting Development: A Guide for African Journalists is available for free here.

The project is funded through the MFSII instrument of the Netherlands Foreign Ministry in The Hague. It is part of a much broader global five-year project ‘Press Freedom 2.0’ that includes Dutch-based media partners World Press Photo, Free Press Unlimited and Mensen met een Missie working in 11 countries on five continents.

Photos were provided courtesy of the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Kenyan photojournalist Sami M Khan.

For more information, please contact:


Marjan Tillmans (Project Manager),

European Journalism Centre

Email: tillmans@ejc.net
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Website: ejc.net

 

Project:
Kenya: Raising Development Awareness Through the Media
The lack of in-depth, well-researched, and effective reporting on development issues in Kenya is weakening the media’s capacity to have an impact on the country’s political processes. EJC’s Kenya programme seeks to raise awareness to this problem, offering workshops dedicated to developing practical solutions by promoting relevant, powerful, and effective journalistic storytelling.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
Maastricht, 12 November 2015

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is proud to announce the winners of the sixth round of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme. A combined total of €270.409 will be awarded to fifteen journalistic projects that advance development reporting and bring the public innovative storytelling on global development.

The final winners were selected during a meeting of the IDR Grant Programme Advisory Council, consisting of senior international journalists. The projects that are eligible for funding will be greenlighted upon signature of a legal contract.

The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets located in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, Spain, the Netherlands, Norway, the United Kingdom and many other countries. The winning projects touch upon multiple development issues, such as deforestation and reforestation; energy inefficiency and sustainable alternatives in Ghana; the impact of large corporations on farmers and seed producers; water scarcity along the Nile; and the recovery journeys of five Ebola-affected districts in Sierra Leone.

The winners were chosen because of their solid story ideas and innovative multi-platform approaches, operating on the crossroads between investigative, data-driven and visual journalism. In addition, the advisory council applauded the multi-platform approach of many applicants, as this magnifies the visibility and impact of their stories.

“We were astounded by the high quality of this round’s applications, as many projects are really innovative both in terms of packaging strategy and topic. Our community of journalists is now comprised by over 166 people, making us one of the largest networks of development journalists in the world. With two more grant rounds to go, we are confident our current and future grantees can give the topic of development a new and exciting spin,” says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

The winners of this round will join a two-day boot camp training on 10 and 11 December, where they will meet fellow grantees and learn from top-level media practitioners. They will work on the development of their stories, cross-disciplinary collaborations with designers and coders, and publication strategies aimed at achieving the best possible public impact.

The sixth call for applications ran from 26 February to 9 September 2015. In total, 144 applications were received.

These are the winning projects:

Project name: Beyond the Paradise
Team: Angelo Attanasio (project lead), Edu Ponce, Eva Domínguez, Arnau Gifreu, David Fernández
Description: Beyond the Paradise is a newsgame that explains the effects of mass tourism in three tropical paradises.
Project locations: Dominican Republic, Thailand, Tanzania
Media outlets: El Periódico de Catalunya (ES), La Stampa (IT)
Budget: €19.500

Project name: Poisoned lives
Team: Desirée García (project lead), Javier Marín
Description: This project explores the unknown lead poisoning caused by car battery recycling plants in African communities.
Project locations: Kenya. Data will also be gathered from other Sub-Saharan African countries
Media outlets: Televisión Española (ES), El Confidencial (ES), Agencia EFE (ES), The Ecologist (UK)
Budget: €17.585

Project name: Agritools – Crowdsourcing Stories on ICT for Agriculture in Africa
Team: Elisabetta Demartis (project lead), Winnie Kamau, Djibi Dem
Description: The project will crowdsource and map African ICT for agriculture initiatives.
Project locations: Senegal, Kenya
Media outlets: L’Espresso (IT), Altermode (FR), La Directa (ES), Le Quotidien (Senegal), TalkAfrica (Kenya)
Budget: €19.150

Project name: The African Energy Project
Team: Caterina Clerici (project lead), Marisa Schwartz Taylor, Kevin Taylor
Description: The African Energy Project explores issues of energy inefficiency in West Africa and homegrown innovations in alternative energy that could set an example for the rest of the planet.
Project locations: Ghana
Media outlets: La Stampa (IT), Libération (FR)
Budget: €19.775

Project name: SEEDcontrol
Team: Elisabetta Tola (project lead), Giordano Cossu, Marco Boscolo, Fiona McLeod
Description: This project will collect data on the corporations that control the global seed market and the impact that they have on farmers and seed producers.
Project locations: South Africa, Italy, Spain, France
Media outlets: RFI (FR), RAI Radio3 Scienza (IT), L’Espresso (IT), NacióDigital (ES); SciDevNet (UK); Euroscientist (FR); Oxpeckers (SA)
Budget: €18.000

Project name: Smart Slums
Team: Lasse Wamsler (project lead), Sven Johannesen, Sune Gudmundsson
Description: Smart Slums shows how people from slums are crowdsourcing data about their neighbourhoods to improve the quality of life.
Project locations: India
Media outlets: Al Jazeera (UK), Dagbladet Information (DK), Dagsavisen (NO), MO* (BE)
Budget: €17.274

Project name: Reserved!
Team: Riccardo Pravettoni (project lead), Marine Gauthier
Description: Reserved! explores the interactions between nature conservation and indigenous peoples, shedding a new light on the impacts conservation projects have on local communities.
Project locations: Malaysia, Democratic Republic of Congo, Brazil
Media outlets: Internazionale (IT), Le Nouvel Obs (FR), Il Post (IT), Carto (FR)
Budget: €22.310

Project name: Lungs of the Earth
Team: Jacopo Ottaviani (project lead), Isacco Chiaf
Description: Lungs of the Earth is a data-driven, immersive and constructive story on forests, deforestation and reforestation around the world.
Media outlets: Al Jazeera International (QA), Internazionale (IT), OneWorld.nl (NL), El País (ES)
Budget: €19.820

Project name: The Nile: Water Scarcity and Development in North Africa
Team: Emir Nader
Description: Journeying the Nile, this project will investigate the dramatically escalating pressures on water in the water scarcest region of the world.
Project locations: Egypt, Sudan, Ethiopia
Media outlets: The Daily and Sunday Telegraph (UK)
Budget: €13.220

Project name: Refugee Economics
Team: Flavie Halais
Description: This project will shed light on refugees living in protracted situations and the positive contribution they bring to local host communities in Uganda and Kenya.
Project locations: Uganda, Kenya
Media outlets: This is Africa – Financial Times (UK)
Budget: €15.000

Project name: Made in Africa
Team: Hans Gerard Moleman
Description: Made in Africa will investigate the socio-economic opportunities in African countries linked to the Chinese model for development, focused on industry. Why do new African factories succeed or fail?
Project locations: Ethiopia, Zambia
Media outlet: VPRO Public Broadcasting (NL)
Budget: €16.000

Project name: Rapid Diagnostic Tests: Measuring a Breakthrough
Team: Antonio Villarreal (project lead), Eduardo Suárez
Description: This project is about the numbers and stories behind rapid diagnostic tests: how much money, time and lives do they save?
Media outlets: El Español (ES), Krautreporter (DE), Efecto Cocuyo (Venezuela), El Ambulante (Colombia/US)
Budget: €9.500

Project name: Medicamentalia II - Vaccines
Team: Eva Belmonte (project lead), David Cabo, Miguel Ángel Gavilanes
Description: Medicamentalia II focuses on the analysis of development, marketing and delivery of vaccines to explain differences in access to health.
Project locations: India, Haiti
Media outlets: Euronews (FR), El Mundo (ES), La Sexta TV (ES), Correct!v (DE) WIRED (IT), The Bureau of Investigative Journalism (UK), Verdensmagasinet X (NO)
Budget: €19.925

Project name: Beyond Ebola
Team: Hazel Healy (project lead), Paul Myles, Libby Powell, Tobias Quinn
Description: Beyond Ebola will bring to life the recovery journeys of five affected districts in Sierra Leone, exploring ongoing impacts and community-led coping strategies.
Project locations: Sierra Leone
Media outlets: New Internationalist (UK), Sky News (UK), On Our Radar (UK)
Budget: €19.900

Project name: Wells of Tears – The Bangladesh Arsenic Project
Team: Sam Loewenberg (project lead), Mark Simon
Description: Wells of Tears will tell the story of the mass arsenic poisoning in Bangladesh and explore solutions to this problem.
Project locations: Bangladesh
Media outlets: El Mundo (ES), The Lancet (UK)
Budget: €23.450

Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes are encouraged to pitch us their creative ideas in the seventh round of applications. The deadline to apply is 2 March 2016 (22:00 CET). The online application form can be found here. For questions, check the FAQ guide or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013, the programme has granted funding to 82 projects.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centred on global development topics. In 2016, the programme will run two rounds of applications and organise two boot camp style trainings tailor-made for the winners of each round.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: on the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

The European Journalism Centre released the Georgian language version of its Making the Media Work for You - A Guide for Civil Society Organisations on 7 October, 2015.

The media communications guide, first launched in early 2015 in English, was translated into Georgian in cooperation with the Georgian Institute of Public Affairs (GIPA), as part of the European Journalism Centre’s five year media development commitment to the country as a member of the Press Freedom 2.0 consortium. The Guide is being widely distributed through GIPA’s network of civil society partners as well as those of EJC’s fellow consortium member, European Partnership for Democracy.

The Georgian language version is available for free download below.

Making the Media Work for You is a publication and resource by the European Journalism Centre specifically designed for civil society organisation communicators. Co-authored by veteran Reuters journalists Lisa Essex and Oliver Wates, and social media whiz Brandon Oelofse of Vuselela Media, the Guide provides practical, cost-effective strategies for organisations that seek to raise and maintain their visibility and impact both in the real and virtual worlds. It also tackles some of the common misconceptions so often found between journalists and civil society organisations.

Making the Media Work for You ‘s content is multi-faceted and accessible: from hyper-local strategies like initiating and maintaining relationships with local journalists to organising social media fueled national campaigns, the Guide’s authors never stray far from the reality of limited communication resources that beset many civil society organisations—where media outreach can often be an afterthought rather than a priority.

Making the Media Work for You hopes to fill that gap, by providing practical advice, strategies and examples of how those tasked with communicating can really make a difference. The Guide is filled with real-world experiences from journalists, non-government and governmental entities, and campaigners. It will give you confidence and advice to ensure your organisations are heard.

Part of the EJC’s five-year Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs sponsored project Press Freedom 2.0, Making the Media Work for You is a collaborative effort of the consortium partners led by EJC which includes Free Press Unlimited, World Press Photo, Mensen met een Missie and theEuropean Partnership for Democracy. The Guide is wholly based on the collective experiences of media strategy capacity building initiatives in Bolivia, Georgia, Kenya and South Africa. Photos were provided courtesy of the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Kenyan photojournalist Sami M Khan.

Download it here: http://newscafe.ge/MEDIA.pdf

Project:
Making the Media Work for You: A Guide for Civil Society Organisations
Making the Media Work for You is a new publication and resource by the European Journalism Centre specifically designed for civil society organisation communicators.

In La Paz, Bolivia 3 September, 23 students received their Masters of Journalism academic diplomas from EJC’s Bolivian partner Fundacion para el Periodismo (FPP). This is the first generation of professionals that have completed the two-year Masters of Journalism degree as part of the country’s only accredited Masters of Journalism programme.

Victor Toro Cardenas, President of FPP, said that the academic curriculum development is the result of a long process of study, analysis, testing and modification with the first steps toward development of the programme beginning back in 2010. The aim was to create a masters degree adapted to the needs of Bolivian society and local media, playing a key role in the implementation of modern journalism in the country based on digital formats and importantly the principles and ethical values ​​of the profession. The Master of Journalism at FPP is an advanced, industry-facing curriculum that combines practice and theory through six modules in which students develops a series of journalistic products after reflection and analysis of current events and news.

From the outset EJC supported the programme; procuring global best-practice expertise and curriculum guidance from Universidad San Andres Clarin in Buenos Aires and the Columbia Graduate School of Journalism in New York. The international cooperation is expected to continue with future exchanges of professors, students and curricula anticipated.

The curriculum was officially accredited in 2014 with the Bolivian Ministry of Education in partnership with the University of Our Lady of La Paz. It is the first and only masters level degree programme in Bolivia. EJC’s work in Bolivia is part of a five-year commitment in Bolivia as a member of the Press Freedom 2.0 consortium, which includes the Dutch-based civil society organisations Free Press Unlimited and Mensen met een Missie, and is funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

The European Journalism Centre released the Spanish and Swahili language versions of its Making the Media Work for You - A Guide for Civil Society Organisations on 14 September, 2015. 

The media communications guide, first launched in early 2015 in English, was translated into Spanish in cooperation with Bolivian local partner Fundacion para el Periodismo (FPP), as part of the European Journalism Centre’s five year media development commitment to the country as a member of the Press Freedom 2.0 consortium. 

The Swahili translation was produced in Kenya jointly with Press Freedom 2.0 consortium memberMensen met een Missie, and their partners that are members of the Kenya Peace Network

Both versions are available for free download below.

Making the Media Work for You is a publication and resource by the European Journalism Centre specifically designed for civil society organisation communicators. Co-authored by veteran Reuters journalists Lisa Essex and Oliver Wates, and social media whiz Brandon Oelofse of Vuselela Media, the Guide provides practical, cost-effective strategies for organisations that seek to raise and maintain their visibility and impact both in the real and virtual worlds. It also tackles some of the common misconceptions so often found between journalists and civil society organisations.

Making the Media Work for You ‘s content is multi-faceted and accessible: from hyper-local strategies like initiating and maintaining relationships with local journalists to organising social media fueled national campaigns, the Guide’s authors never stray far from the reality of limited communication resources that beset many civil society organisations—where media outreach can often be an afterthought rather than a priority.

Making the Media Work for You hopes to fill that gap, by providing practical advice, strategies and examples of how those tasked with communicating can really make a difference. The Guide is filled with real-world experiences from journalists, non-government and governmental entities, and campaigners. It will give you confidence and advice to ensure your organisations are heard.

Part of the EJC’s five-year Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs sponsored project Press Freedom 2.0, Making the Media Work for You is a collaborative effort of the consortium partners led by EJC which includes Free Press Unlimited, World Press Photo, Mensen met een Missie and theEuropean Partnership for Democracy. The Guide is wholly based on the collective experiences of media strategy capacity building initiatives in Bolivia, Georgia, Kenya and South Africa. Photos were provided courtesy of the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Kenyan photojournalist Sami M Khan.

Project:
Making the Media Work for You: A Guide for Civil Society Organisations
Making the Media Work for You is a new publication and resource by the European Journalism Centre specifically designed for civil society organisation communicators.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 11, 2015

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is thrilled to announce that it has received 144 applications in the sixth round of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme. 

Over the next four weeks, the EJC will evaluate the entries and inform all applicants of the status of their application(s). Due to the large number of submissions, we will however not be able to give individual feedback to unsuccessful candidates. Shortlisted applicants will then have one month’s time to submit a complete proposal and provide any necessary supporting documents. The grant winners will be announced mid to end November.

“This round has yielded once again a substantial number of applications. We are very happy to notice the constant interest from many freelance journalists and renowned media houses in covering international development topics. In today’s interconnected world, this is more than ever important”, says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

Interested journalists, who did not get around to pitching their development reporting ideas in time, can submit applications in the next round. The next deadline is 2 March 2016 (22:00 CET). Innovative pitches can be submitted via the online application form.

For a showcase of previously awarded grants, see our portfolio. For any questions, contact us at info@journalismgrants.org.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the programme granted funding to 67 projects. 

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centered on global development topics. In 2016 the programme will again run two rounds of applications and organise two Bootcamp style trainings tailor-made for the winners of each round.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org

Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

On Monday 17 August 2015 the European Journalism Centre (EJC) released a Bosnian Serbian Croatian (BSC) and a Turkish translation of its Verification Handbook. With these two language versions, the Verification Handbook is now translated in eight languages including French, Arabic, Spanish, Portuguese, Ukrainian, and Greek.

The Bosnian Serbian Croatian (BSC) version was produced in partnership with Mediacentar Sarajevo, a media training organisation based in Sarajevo, Bosnia and Herzegovina (BiH), as part of the Public Data Now project which is financially supported by the Dutch government’s MATRA programme. Mediacentar Sarajevo supports the development of independent and professional journalism in BiH through trainings, publishing, media research, TV and audio production, and organisation of different cultural events.

The Turkish translation was created with a collaboration between Pirate Party Turkey, a political movement in Turkey that follows the model of the Swedish Pirate Party and Ninja Medya, a digital journalism initiative in Turkey. The translation effort was led by Mehmet Atakan Foça, a trained journalist with the editorial support by Berk Göbekcioğlu and the volunteer translators including Gürkan Özturan, Gülşah Deniz, Emre Sorkun, Onurcan Önal, Berk Göbekcioğlu, Volkan Hatem, Şafak Erol, Atakan Tatar, and Şevket Uyanık.

The Bosnian Serbian Croatian (BSC) version is now available via the following URL: http://verificationhandbook.com/book_cr/

The Turkish version is now available via the following URL: http://verificationhandbook.com/book_tr

For more information, sign up via http://verificationhandbook.com for updates.

About the Mediacentar Sarajevo (MCS)

The organisation was founded in 1995 by the Open Society Fund in Bosnia and Herzegovina. Since 2000 the centre has been registered as a separate educational and research institution owned by Open Society Fund BiH. Throughout years, the Mediacentar has developed a set of programs for improving the overall state of journalism, media professionalism and media freedoms in Bosnia-Herzegovina and the Southeast Europe, through its educational, research, and web-based programmes.

Website: www.media.ba

About the Pirate Party Turkey

The Pirate Party Turkey (Turkish: Korsan Parti Türkiye) is a not-yet-officially-formed political party movement in Turkey based on the model of the Swedish Pirate Party. The party opposes the dismantlement of civil rights in telephony and on the Internet, in particular the European data retention policies and Turkey’s view on Internet censorship. It also opposes various measures of surveillance of citizens. The party favors the civil right to information privacy and reforms of copyright, education, computer science and genetic patents.
Website: https://korsanparti.org/

 

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

On Wednesday 17 June 2015, the European Journalism Centre (EJC) released a Greek translation of its Verification Handbook in partnership with the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki. The translation efforts were led and managed by Andreas Veglis of the Media Informatics Lab, the School of Journalism & MMC at the Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and Charalampos Bratsas of the Web of Science postgraduate program at the Department of Mathematics, Aristotle University of Thessaloniki and the CEO of the Open Knowledge Foundation’s Greek Chapter.

The handbook provides step-by-step guidelines on how to verify user-generated content (UGC) during breaking news. Since the launch of the English edition, it received more than 50,000 downloads and is now widely read by news journalists, aid responders, and other stakeholders from all around the world.

The Greek version is now made available via the following URL: http://verificationhandbook.com/book_gr/

Other translations including Chinese, Turkish, and Serbian-Bosnian-Croatian (BSC) will be made available. For more information, sign up via http://verificationhandbook.com

—-

For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact: 
Rina Tsubaki

Email: info@verificationhandbook.com

Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

The winners of the fourth annual Georgian Institute of Public Affairs (GIPA)-Josh Friedman Excellence in Investigative Journalism Prize were announced at a ceremony in the Georgian capital Tbilisi on 9 June 2015. The two top awards went to Nino Zuriashvili of Studio Monitor for her investigation into tuberculosis patients declared terminally ill in Georgia that went on to be cured in France, and Nato Gogelia of multi-media outlet Guria News, for a series focused on misuse of public funds in school reparations, the impact of which has led to government investigations. ​

A special Public Service Award was awarded to Nino Zautashvili, host of the Public Broadcasting programme “Realuri Sivrtse” for her in-depth coverage of the Georgian government’s decision to allow excavation at the Sakdrisi gold mine in a region that archaeologists claim is historically protected.

Other submissions that received recognition included investigations into corruption inside the Georgian postal service and ISIS connections in Georgia’s Pankisi Gorge. (A full list of winners with links to stories is provided below). Over 75 submissions were examined by the jury and judged for their investigative professionalism, research, innovation, societal impact and ethics.

Hosted by GIPA Programme Director Tiko Tsomaia at the Radisson Blue Iveria Hotel, the event featured speeches by the prize’s namesake, Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and Committee to Protect Journalists Board member Josh Friedman, along with GIPA Rector Maka Ioseliani, Dean Nino Ivanishvili, data journalism advisor Peter Verweij of D-3 Media Netherlands and EJC Country Manager Josh LaPorte.

Following the award ceremony ‘Homicide Watch-Georgia’ was launched, a project to inform the Georgian public about homicide, and specifically femicide, in the country by enabling journalists to report on crime trends utilising data journalism tools and resources. The project is a collaboration of the GIPA School of Journalism, JumpStart Georgia Data Visualization Project, and the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project (OCCRP).

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) and the Georgian Institute of Public Affairs (GIPA) established the GIPA-Friedman prize in 2012 to recognise excellence in investigative journalism in Georgia as well as build local capacity for innovative approaches to reporting. It is part of EJC’s five-year commitment in Georgia as a member of the Press Freedom 2.0 consortium, which includes the Dutch-based civil society organisations Free Press Unlimited and Mensen met een Missie, and is funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Grand Prizes:

Public Service Award:

Best Investigative Interview:

Runner Up Prizes:

Pulitzer Prize winning Josh Friedman with winners of the 2015 GIPA-Friedman Prize for Excellence in Journalism
Pulitzer Prize winning Josh Friedman with winners of the 2015 GIPA-Friedman Prize for Excellence in Journalism
Nino Zautashvili of Public Broadcasting programme ‘Realuri Sivrtse’ was presented with the Public Service Award
Nino Zautashvili of Public Broadcasting programme ‘Realuri Sivrtse’ was presented with the Public Service Award
Programme Director and Associate Professor Tiko Tsomaia hosted the event and launched GIPA's Homicide Watch-Georgia project
Programme Director and Associate Professor Tiko Tsomaia hosted the event and launched GIPA’s Homicide Watch-Georgia project
Josh Friedman highlighted Georgia as a beacon of good journalism in a region full of challenges to press freedom.
Josh Friedman highlighted Georgia as a beacon of good journalism in a region full of challenges to press freedom.
Peter Verweij discussed the importance of open data resources in accountability journalism.
Peter Verweij discussed the importance of open data resources in accountability journalism.
GIPA Dean Nino Ivanishvili opened the 4th Annual GIPA-Josh Friedman Prize Ceremony
GIPA Dean Nino Ivanishvili opened the 4th Annual GIPA-Josh Friedman Prize Ceremony


Project:
Georgia: Finances and Transparency - New Approaches for Georgian Journalism
Addressing a Georgian-specific problem, namely the absence of investigative coverage of economic corruption issues, the project's objective is to promote excellence in journalism by instituting a competition on the national level. Our work in Georgia also involves journalistic capacity building through training, developed in cooperation with local institutions and international organisations.

Press release

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 15th, 2015

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) launched a new website, www.journalismgrants.org, for its Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme.

The revamped website gives greater prominence to the 53 funded projects, while at the same time putting in the spotlight the 110 members of a large journalism community built around the grant programme.

On the new platform, the public can explore the IDR community, consisting of grant winners and their teams, which are made up of journalists, data journalism experts, news game designers, photographers, cameramen, web developers and technical support teams.

The website not only gives the due visibility to the people behind the funded projects, it also brings to the forefront the media outlets that are supporting the publication of these stories.

The awards and nominations received by the winners of the grant programme are now also featured on the revamped website, thus highlighting the outstanding achievements obtained from renowned journalism awards competitions.

Among other new elements on the website is the timeline of the calls for applications running in 2015, which provides details of all upcoming events in 2015 – including the open calls for applications and the boot camps.

As a first step towards measuring the impact of the funded projects, the new website allows the audience to view the social media reach of the published stories.

“We are very pleased to launch a new website showcasing the extraordinary work of our incredible and constantly expanding journalism community. We are confident that the new platform will not only bring more visibility to the teams behind the projects, but will also inspire other talented journalists to apply for upcoming grant rounds,” said Wilfried Ruetten, the Director of the EJC.

The EJC is currently running the sixth call for applications. The deadline ends on 9 September 2015 (22:00 CET). Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes can pitch their stories via the online application form.

For questions, check the FAQ guide, or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

—-

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013, the has programme granted funding to 53 projects.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centred on global development topics. In 2015–2016, the programme will run four rounds of applications and organise four boot camp style events tailor-made for the winners of each round.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: on the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/
Website EJC: http://www.ejc.net

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

On Thursday 30 April 2015, the European Journalism Centre (EJC) released a French translation of its Verification Handbook. The translated version was produced in partnership with the Code for Africa, a non-profit organisation based in Nairobi, Kenya, with the financial support by the Open Society Foundation’s Independent Journalism. The release is made at the occasion of the News Impact Summit on the theme “Future of User Engagement for News” in Paris.

Following the four language versions, namely Portuguese, Arabic, Spanish and Ukrainian, this is the fifth official translation since the release of the Verification Handbook, which provides step-by-step guidelines for both journalists and aid responders on how to handle user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies. The French version is now made available via the following URL:

http://verificationhandbook.com/book_fr
Other translations including Chinese, Turkis, Greek and Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian (BSC) will be made available as well. For more information, sign up via http://verificationhandbook.com/ for updates.

About Code for Africa (http://codeforafrica.org), it is an initiative driven and co-funded by grassroots citizen organizations and the mass media. It is focused primarily on building civic technology capacity within civil society and the watchdog media.
—-
For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact: 
Rina Tsubaki

Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

Press Release
For Immediate Release
15 April, 2015

Maastricht, the Netherlands - The European Journalism Centre (EJC) has released the Verification Handbook for Investigative Reporting, a companion handbook to the Verification Handbook which was published by the Centre in early 2014.

While the initial Verification Handbook centred on verification for breaking news coverage, this handbook provides the fundamentals of online search and research techniques for investigations. It goes deeper into techniques for UGC investigations; it provides best practices for evaluating and verifying open data, gives sound advice on workflow for fact-checking investigative projects and ethical approaches to UGC in investigations.

Comprised of ten chapters and three case studies, this Handbook has gathered knowledge and expertise from some of the world’s leading media, research and civil society organisations, including BBC, Bellingcat, Der Spiegel, the Tow Center for Digital Journalism at Columbia University, the African Network of Centers for Investigative Reporting, the Arab Reporters for Investigative Reporting, Amnesty International, WITNESS, The SecDev Foundation and SAM.

An online version of Verification Handbook is available for free at http://verificationhandbook.com/book2/

The initiative is financed by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science.

===

Website: http://verificationhandbook.com
Twitter hashtag: #vh4ij
For more information, please contact:
Rina Tsubaki (Project Manager), European Journalism Centre
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

The Thomson Reuters Foundation and the European Journalism Centre condemn the raid that took place on Thursday at the offices of The Source, an online business and financial news service in Zimbabwe.

According to Reuters witnesses, police and lawyers from Econet Wireless raided the offices of The Source in a dispute over stories published by the agency earlier this year. The lawyers, accompanied by the sheriff department and technology experts, went through staff communications and downloaded emails and documents onto a memory stick, the witnesses said.

The Thomson Reuters Foundation and the European Journalism Centre created The Source with core funding from the Dutch government two years ago to encourage the highest standards of business journalism in Zimbabwe. The Source is now independent from the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“We deeply regret today’s events. Although The Source is now independent from us, we are close to The Source editorial team in Harare, which implements the highest standards of business journalism with fair, accurate and impartial reporting at its core,” said Monique Villa, CEO of the Thomson Reuters Foundation.

“We regret the events in Harare and ask the authorities to ensure that The Source continues to provide citizens and stakeholders with trusted financial and business news and analysis,” said Wilfried Ruetten, Director of the European Journalism Centre.

As reported by Reuters earlier on Thursday, Econet Wireless and its Steward Bank business have criticised stories published by The Source in February and March. They have not disputed the content of the stories, but say the agency used internal documents without their authority.

A High Court judge on March 16 granted Econet and Steward an order to search the premises and computers of the agency for information belonging to the firms and “to seize and place such information in the custody of the Registrar” of the court.

The Source and its reporters challenged the action and sought to have the case referred to the Constitutional Court (Concourt). They argued the order violated constitutional rights of freedom of expression and freedom of the media.

The High Court has not yet ruled on the request by The Source for referral to the southern African nation’s highest court.

The lawyers and technology experts combed through emails for more than an hour and downloaded them onto a memory stick.

Chris Mhike, a lawyer for The Source who was present during the search, said he had hoped Econet would have waited for the Constitutional Court decision before conducting the raid.

Foster Dongozi, secretary general of the Zimbabwe Union of Journalists, said the action by Econet and Steward was a “brazen attack on press freedom”.

Project:
Zimbabwe: Establishing the Country’s First Independent Financial News Service
Believing Zimbabwe can boost its own economic development by increasing awareness and improving citizens’ general knowledge of financial matters, we have sought, together with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, to establish the country’s first source of accurate, sustainable, and independent financial and economic news, owned and operated by Zimbabweans.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 26, 2015


The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce that it has received 133 applications in the fifth round of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme.

Over the next five weeks, the EJC will evaluate the entries and inform all applicants of the status of their application(s). Due to the large number of submissions, we will however not be able to give individual feedback to unsuccessful candidates. Shortlisted applicants will then have one month’s time to submit a complete proposal and provide any necessary supporting documents. The grant winners will be announced mid to end May.

“In this round we will be reviewing applications which had to comply with tougher conditions. This is because as of 2015 we updated our application criteria and challenged the applicants to think also about the impact they want to achieve with their projects. We are thus very curious to see how journalists have thought about the impact and how they connected it to their journalistic work. We are excited about the results to come and hope these will yield innovative stories that seek to bring change to societies worldwide”, says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

Interested journalists, who did not get around to pitching their development reporting ideas in time, can submit applications in the next round. The deadline is the 9th of September 2015 (22:00 CET). Innovative pitches can be submitted via the online application form.

For a showcase of previously awarded grants, see our portfolio. For any questions, contact us at info@journalismgrants.org.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the programme granted funding to 53 projects.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will all be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centered on global development topics. In 2015-2016 the programme will run four rounds of applications and organise four Bootcamp style events tailor-made for the winners of each round. Additionally, in March the programme will have a new website focused on measuring impact of funded projects.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

The European Journalism Centre

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 23, 2015

The European Journalism Centre announces the launch of a series of eight media innovation events for journalists and editors which will take place in major media capitals of Europe.

The News Impact Summits are a new type of media innovation event, organised by the European Journalism Centre (EJC) in cooperation with The News Lab at Google, focusing on how recently developed approaches and tools can significantly change the way we work in the newsroom, the way we tell stories, and the way we engage audiences and society as a whole.

Free of charge, mixing keynote speeches, ignite talks, panel discussions and above all, training sessions, the series will focus on major media innovation trends, and will try to assess the impact of tools used by innovative newsrooms and journalists.

The first News Impact Summit takes place in Brussels on the 24th of February 2015, and features speakers from Datawrapper, L’Echo, De Tijd, International Consortium for Investigative Journalists (ICIJ), JournalismFund, Euractiv, The Financial Times and Gruppo L’Espresso. It will be followed by events in Hamburg on March 31 and Paris on April 28; to be followed by events in Madrid, London, Amsterdam, Warsaw and Prague later in the year.

To register for any of the events, and for program details, please visit newsimpact.io.

Website: http://newsimpact.io
Contact: info@newsimpact.io

——

The European Journalism Centre

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries.

News Lab at Google

The News Lab at Google empowers the creation of media that improves people’s lives. Our mission is to collaborate with journalists and entrepreneurs everywhere to build the future of media with Google. We do this through product partnerships, media trainings, and programs that foster the development of the news industry as a whole.

Project:
News Impact Summit
The News Impact Summits are a new type of media innovation event, organised by the European Journalism Centre (EJC) in cooperation with the News Lab at Google, focusing on how recently developed approaches and tools can significantly change the way we work in the newsroom, the way we tell stories, and the way we engage audiences and society as a whole.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
February 20, 2015

On Friday 20 February 2015, the European Journalism Centre released an Ukrainian translation of its Verification Handbook. The translated version was produced in an effort led by the Ukrainian Association of Press Publishers (UAPP) in Kiev, with the financial support by the Open Society Foundation - Independent Media. Following the three language versions namely Portuguese, Arabic and Spanish, this is the fourth official translation since the release of the Verification Handbook.

The Ukrainian version is now made available via the following URL: http://verificationhandbook.com/book_ua

The European Journalism Centre also received funding from the Open Society Foundation to carry out a verification training in Kiev, Ukraine where about twenty Ukrainian journalists from national and regional media outlets received hands-on training on how to verify digital contents. The training workshop was held as part of the 10th module of University of Journalists’ Skills organised by the UAPP.

It is very important for Ukrainian journalists to use modern experience of verification. Like never before, huge amount of fake and false information is circulating in Ukrainian media environment. Thus professional level, in addition to the social responsibility, is crucial for journalism to be helpful for Ukraine and our citizens. It is hard to overestimate the importance and helpfulness of the Ukrainian version of Verification Handbook at this moment of Ukrainian history”, states Oleksii Pogorelov, General Director of the Ukrainian Association of Press Publishers (UAPP)

Other translations will be made available, including French, Greek and Serbian, Bosnian and Croatian (BSC). For more information, sign up via http://verificationhandbook.com/ for updates.

About UAPP

Ukrainian Association of Press Publishers (UAPP, www.uapp.org) is voluntary, non-government, non-profit organization – association of publishers, who joined efforts to assist traditional and digital media to develop, to improve professional skills of journalists and editors, to simplify regulations and rules, to make business conditions more favourable. From the date of creation (since 2001) UAPP is consequently paying a big attention to provide publishers, editor and journalists with the modern knowledge, experience and technology, necessary to develop their titles as well as publishing market as a whole.

—-

For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:
Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

European Journalism Centre’s project partner in South Africa, Vuselela-Media, officially launched a new youth news and current affairs magazine show “Bona Retsang” at an event earlier this month in Johannesburg. Part of EJC’s multi-year commitment to strengthening media literacy in the country, Bona Retsang will begin airing on South African Broadcasting Corporation (SABC) Channel 1 every Wednesday, Thursday and Friday at 16:00. The content of Bona Retsang is made in collaboration with South Africa’s youth, mainly in the country’s underprivileged communities.

The show is unique in that it broadcasts content made on cell phones and entry-level camera equipment, made by high school students and youth community journalists from across the country. The aim according to Mthoba Chapi, a director of Vuselela Media (the organisation that creates Bona Retsang) “is to get young people talking about the issues they face, but more importantly, showcasing young people who have solutions to these problems.”

“The viewer is a part of making the show by showing us how they have over powered the problem, hence the name Bona Retsang, a Sotho term meaning ‘Look at what we are doing’ “ says Shane Potgieter, a producer of the show.

The launch event for the programme, included a visit to the Bona Retsang studios where young journalists got a chance to see the creation of the show. A round table discussion was held in which EJC and other organizations of the international journalism community and local project alliances was conducted to discuss what impact the project had seen among youth and the marginalised communities in which the project operates.

The show is hosted by hip and well-informed young people: Phethile Khuzwayo (also known as P.K.) who is also the shows producer, up-and-coming hip hop artist S’phamanda “Maraza” Mhlongo and Zack “Zack Attack” Roberts.

Bona Retsang also brings the lives of those who are familiar to TV screens into the spotlight. This includes celebrity guests who help viewers believe that they too can overcome anything, by sharing their personal triumphs and failures. The show offers the viewer aspirational stories through user-generated content inspiring a ‘do-it-yourself’ attitude, combined with useful information, humor and all round entertainment.

Bona Retsang is produced by Vuselela-Media in association with EJC as well as Free Press Unlimited, loveLife and SABC Education and is part of EJC’ s multi-year Press Freedom 2.0 consortium, a global media development programme funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.


Inside the studios of Bona Retsang, a Sotho language term meaning
Inside the studios of Bona Retsang, the flagship youth TV programme supported by EJC in South Africa.

Bona Retsang will now air three times a week on public broadcaster SADC and is hosted by up-and-coming hip hop artist S’phamanda “Maraza” Mhlongo (far left) and Phethile Khuzwayo (far right)--known as P.K.-- who is also the show's producer
Bona Retsang will now air three times a week on public broadcaster SADC and is hosted by up-and-coming hip hop artist S’phamanda “Maraza” Mhlongo (far left) and Phethile Khuzwayo (far right)—known as P.K.—who is also the show’s producer

Launch event speakers included some of the Bona Retsang youth journalists that provide the on-site video story-telling of youth issues from their communities for the programme
Launch event speakers included the Bona Retsang youth journalists who provide the programme its on-site video material focused on local community youth issues and solutions

S’phamanda “Maraza” Mhlongo and Zack “Zack Attack” Roberts mc'd portions of the launch event
S’phamanda “Maraza” Mhlongo and Zack “Zack Attack” Roberts mc’d portions of the launch event


Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Press release
The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
3 February 2015

The Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs announced 30 January that the European Journalism Centre, in alliance with Amsterdam-based Free Press Unlimited, was selected as a Strategic Partner in the Ministry’s new development aid programme for the period 2016 - 2021.

A total of 25 Dutch-led civil society consortia were selected for funding through “Dialogue and Dissent’, an advocacy-strengthening policy approach the Foreign Ministry is taking toward aid to low and middle income countries.  The new programme allows EJC to continue to build upon its support of media education and access to independent information through further professionalisation of journalists and media actors so that they can better serve the interests of society.

In its assessment letter the Ministry wrote: “This application combines the forces of Free Press Unlimited on media development, with emphasis on youth and women, fragile and repressive states and of the European Journalism Centre in the fields of journalism training and technology development.”

“We are very pleased to have been selected for this important partnership with the Ministry” said EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten. “It gives EJC the opportunity to continue to broaden our work through knowledge and resource sharing with the wider media community, while playing a role in affecting positive societal change in countries with developing media landscapes”.

In the coming months the alliance will focus on shaping the cooperation details with the Ministry with an expected start date of January 2016.

For further info please contact:
European Journalism Centre: Marjan Tillmans: tillmans@ejc.net
Free Press Unlimited: Michelle Klünder: klunder@freepressunlimited.org

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 27, 2015

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) announces News Impact Summit Brussels, a new type of media innovation event for journalists and editors, organised by the EJC in cooperation with the News Lab at Google, which will take place on the 24th of February 2015.

After a successful pilot event in Vienna in October 2014, the News Impact Summit comes to Brussels, and will focus on new approaches and tools to cover the European Union, with a strong emphasis on data-driven approaches. In partnership with L’Echo and De Tijd, Storycode, the Association of European Journalists and the Brussels Press Club, this one-day event will feature high-level journalism professionals as speakers, from major broadcast journalists to Belgian print managers, from social media news editors to data journalism practitioners.

The number of seats for this free event are limited and are assigned on a first come first serve basis, early registration is recommended. Lunch and drinks will be offered free of charge.

Website: http://newsimpact.io
Contact: info@newsimpact.io
Hashtag: #nisbxl

——

The European Journalism Centre

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries.

News Lab at Google

The News Lab at Google empowers the creation of media that improves people’s lives. Our mission is to collaborate with journalists and entrepreneurs everywhere to build the future of media with Google. We do this through product partnerships, media trainings, and programs that foster the development of the news industry as a whole.

Project:
News Impact Summit
The News Impact Summits are a new type of media innovation event, organised by the European Journalism Centre (EJC) in cooperation with the News Lab at Google, focusing on how recently developed approaches and tools can significantly change the way we work in the newsroom, the way we tell stories, and the way we engage audiences and society as a whole.

For Immediate Release


27 January 2015 15hCET

Maastricht, the Netherlands - The European Journalism Centre (EJC) has released Making the Media Work for You, a new publication and resource specifically designed for civil society organisation communicators.

Co-authored by veteran Reuters journalists Lisa Essex and Oliver Wates, and social media whiz Brandon Oelofse of Vuselela Media, Making the Media Work for You provides practical, cost-effective strategies for organisations that seek to raise and maintain their visibility and impact both in the real and virtual worlds. It also tackles some of the common misconceptions so often found between journalists and civil society organisations.

Making the Media Work for You ‘s content is multi-faceted and accessible: from hyper- local strategies like initiating and maintaining relationships with local journalists to organising social media fueled national campaigns, the Guide’s authors never stray far from the reality of limited communication resources that many civil society organisations face.

An online version of Making the Media Work for You is available for free here. Spanish, Swahili and Georgian language versions of the Guide will be released in the coming months.

Part of the European Journalism Centre’s Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs sponsored project Press Freedom 2.0, Making the Media Work for You is a collaborative effort of the consortium partners led by EJC which includes Free Press Unlimited, World Press Photo, Mensen met een Missie and the European Partnership for Democracy.

Photos were provided courtesy of the Thomson Reuters Foundation and Kenyan photojournalist Sami M Khan.

Project page
Twitter hashtag: #mediacomms

For more information, please contact:
Josh LaPorte (Project Manager),
European Journalism Centre
Email: laporte@ejc.net

Tel: +31 43 325 40 30
Website: ejc.net

Project:
Making the Media Work for You: A Guide for Civil Society Organisations
Making the Media Work for You is a new publication and resource by the European Journalism Centre specifically designed for civil society organisation communicators.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
January 20, 2015

On Tuesday 20 January 2015, the European Journalism Centre released an Spanish translation of its Verification Handbook, a free resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies. This is the third official translation since the release of the English version of the Verification Handbook in early 2014.

The translated version was produced in an effort led by the team at AccesoLibre in Venezuela, with support by following individual contributors: Sebastian Magrí, David Martínez, Daniel Rodriguez, Myriam Redondo, Silvia Cobo, José Luis Rivas and Gabriela Marquez.

The Spanish website version is now made available via the following URL:

http://verificationhandbook.com/book_es/
—-
For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:

Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

Press release

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

January 14, 2015

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) has launched today, January 14th, the fifth call for applications for its Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme. Journalists and media organisations can submit applications for innovative development storytelling grants until the 25th of February 2015 (22:00 CET). Story ideas can be pitched via the online application form.

“Alongside the new UN Sustainable Development Goals, we have, as of this round, also updated our application criteria because we want the funded projects to meet the new development priorities and to achieve meaningful public impact. At a crossroads moment for global development, we want to support stories that can have an impact on societies globally, by also looking into solutions to the most stringent problems of development”, said Wilfried Ruetten, EJC Director.

In order to maximise the impact of the funded projects, the updated application criteria make reference to such elements as: strong editorial and journalistic approach, good transnational reach, innovation of topic and format, well-thought-out packaging, publication and delivery strategy, and significant impact on societies. These renewed criteria will firmly guide the entire assessment process, which will place an important emphasis on stories that can ensure a major impact on targeted audiences.

“The year 2015 will be historical for global development and we are very proud that we can continue supporting new development narratives through additional funding awarded by the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation allowing us to extend the grant programme to 2015 and 2016”, added Wilfried Ruetten.

The IDR Grant Programme has received $1,785,000 for the period of 2015 and 2016 that will all be awarded to innovative journalistic projects centered on global development topics. In 2015-2016 the programme will run four rounds of applications and organise four Bootcamp style events tailor-made for the winners of each round. Additionally, in the coming months the programme will have a new website focused on measuring impact of funded projects.

For a showcase of awarded grants, see our portfolio. For any questions, contact us atinfo@journalismgrants.org.

Note for editors:

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the programme granted funding to 53 projects.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
December 8, 2014

On Monday 8 December 2014, the European Journalism Centre released an Arabic translation of its Verification Handbook. The translated version was produced in an effort led by Anas Qtiesh of Meedan, and with support of Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism and a coalition of volunteer translators. Following the Portuguese version, this is the second official translation since the release of the Verification Handbook.

The Arabic version is now made available via the following URL: http://verificationhandbook.com/book_ar/

The European Journalism Centre also received funding from the Open Society Foundation to carry out a verification training in Amman, Jordan where the Arab investigative journalists and trainers received hands-on training by Craig Silverman (editor of the Verification Handbook and Emergent.info), Eliot Higgins (founder of Brown Moses Blog and Bellingcat), and Ed Bice (founder of Checkdesk/Meedan). The training workshops were part of the ARIJ 7th Annual Forum, organised by Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism.

In today’s Arab world, where media has never been so polarised, divided and fuel for national discord and hate speech, social media has become an alternative for news and misinformation. In these trying times, your latest handbook is a must for any professional journalist and media practitioner. It is user-friendly, and has great practical exercises. Your training sessions at the ARIJ conference have been a big hit with over 200 participants asking ARIJ to integrate it in our future trainings. Thanks for providing Arab journalists with amazing tools of the trade.”, states Rana Sabbagh, Executive Director​ of ARIJ.

Other translations will be made available, including Ukrainian and French. For more information, sign up via http://verificationhandbook.com/ for updates.

About Meedan
Meedan is a non-profit social technology company which aims to increase cross-language interaction on the web, with particular emphasis on translation and aggregation services in Arabic and English. Through its use of Machine Translation (MT), Machine Augmented Translation (MAT), and distributed human translation, Meedan’s goal is to increase dialogue and exchange between Arabic and English speakers primarily by launching a cross-language forum for conversation and media sharing. The company has contributed to “Case Study 6.1: Tripped Up by Arabic Grammar” of the Verification Handbook, and founded Checkdesk, an open verification tool that supports collaborative UGC verification.

About Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism
Arab Reporters for Investigative Journalism (ARIJ) is the first and only nonprofit organization in the region dedicated to promoting investigative journalism in Arab newsrooms, still an alien practice. The Amman-based ARIJ was formed in early 2005 to support independent quality professional journalism, through funding in-depth journalism projects, and offering media coaching. It helps journalists working in print, radio, tv and online media in Jordan, Syria, Lebanon, Egypt, Iraq, Bahrain, Palestine, Yemen and Tunisia.

—-

For more information about the Verification Handbook, please contact:

Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

At a ceremony 21 November in La Paz, EJC officially launched the Spanish language version of its Media Literacy textbook, Newsroom III: Basic Principles of Media Literacy for teachers and students, in cooperation with local partner Fundación para el Periodismo and the Bolivian Ministry of Education.

The event featured keynote speeches by Bolivian Minister for Communication Amanda Davila and EJC’s Marjan Tillmans, both touching on the importance of being media and news literate in modern, open societies.

The publication is being distributed to primary and secondary schools across the country as part of EJC’s commitment to train school teachers and advocate for media literacy classes into the national school curriculum. Divided into five curriculum units, the textbook focuses on basic principles of media literacy, stereotyping, ethics, politics as well as including a full chapter dedicated to new media. Originating from an earlier EJC-led project in Macedonia, the book is based on the first edition published in cooperation with the Macedonian Institute for Media in 2011.

Youth journalism prizes awarded

Prizes were also given at the same event to secondary school teams that participated in two national journalism competitions organised by Fundacion para el Periodismo. “The Interview of My Dreams” competition featured organiser-facilitated interviews with Bolivian public figures. This year’s first prize went to the Horizontes Secondary School of La Paz for their interview of Xabier Azkargorta, football coach of Club Bolivar as well as the Bolivian National Team.

The second competition, “Journalist For a Day” was awarded to the best student team investigative reportage and was given to the Eduardo Laredo School of Cochabamba for their in-depth piece on student abuse by public transportation drivers. Fundacion para el Periodismo has implemented both competitions, part of WAN/IFRA’s global Youth Engagement and News Literacy programming, in Bolivia since 2012.

Newsroom III: Basic Principles of Media Literacy for teachers and students, the Spanish language version of EJC's media literacy textbook, was released in Bolivia and distributed to schools across the country.
Newsroom III: Basic Principles of Media Literacy for teachers and students, the Spanish language version of EJC’s media literacy textbook, was released in Bolivia and distributed to schools across the country.

The student team from Horizontes Secondary School in La Paz, winners of 2014
The student team from Horizontes Secondary School in La Paz, winners of 2014 “The Interview of My Dreams’ competition for their piece on football coach Xabier Azkargorta.

Bolivian Minister of Communication, Amanda Davila (centre), gave the keynote address during the event and presented students with prizes and certificates of achievement.
Bolivian Minister of Communication, Amanda Davila (centre), gave the keynote address during the event and presented students with prizes and certificates of achievement.
The event's panel included EJC
The event’s panel included EJC"s Marjan Tillmans, Bolivian Communication Minister Amanda Davila, and Fundacion’s Renan Estenssoro and Isabel Mercado.
Winning student teams had their stories published in major Bolivian newspapers such as Pagina Siete.
Winning student teams had their stories published in major Bolivian newspapers such as Pagina Siete.



Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

October 29, 2014

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is thrilled to announce the winners of the fourth round of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme.

Twelve remarkable projects will be awarded a combined total of more than 200.000 Euros in funding to innovate global development narratives and bring to the public new journalistic storytelling around the Millennium Development Goals. An advisory council of senior journalists oversaw the final decisions of the awards. The projects that have been identified to be eligible for funding will be greenlighted upon signature of a legal contract.

The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets located in Denmark, France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom. Funded topics will focus on issues such as: the fishing industry in Senegal, electronic waste in Ghana, access to sanitation in India and Democratic Republic of Congo, the Queen Mothers in Ghana, small and medium sized companies in west Africa, GMOs to fight hunger and poverty, drugs and vaccines prices, former child soldiers, African charcoal trade, the resilience of African megacities, menstrual taboos in developing countries.

The winners will employ multi-platform approaches, engage in cross-country media collaboration and make use of interactive applications, as well as investigative, data-driven and photo journalism.

“We are very much looking forward to the results of the projects and have the conviction that they will show the European citizens the real face of development”, says EJC Director Wilfried Rütten.

The fourth round of the grant programme ran from 21 May until 23 July 2014. Over 250 applications were received.

Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes are encouraged to pitch us their creative ideas in the fifth round of applications. The deadline to apply is 25 February 2015 (22:00 CET). The online application form will be opened on the 14th of January 2015. For questions, check the FAQ guide or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

Project name: Fish for cheap

Description: How subsidized foreign vessels plunder West African waters
Project locations: Spain (Canary islands, Madrid), Senegal
Media outlet: Internazionale, Courrier International, Al Jazeera english, Le Monde diplomatique – Germany, El Pais

Project name: Life, death and miracles of electronic waste

Description: The project will expose the multifaceted nature of e-waste and highlight constructive initiatives to counteract it.
Project locations: Ghana, UK, the world
Media outlets: Internazionale, Al Jazeera International, El País

Project name: Toilet for All

Description: Investigating barriers to universal access to sanitation in India and DRC
Project locations: Mumbai, India; Lubumbashi, DRC
Media outlets: Wired Italia, El Pais Planeta Futuro, Zoomin.TV

Project name: African Queen Mothers Fight for Africa

Description: Traditional Queen Mothers unleash a formidable transforming force in Africa.
Project locations: Ghana’s Southern and Northern regions
Media outlet: BBC World Service and purpose-built website

Project name: Small is Powerful

Description: Study of the underrated impact local SMEs have on Africa’s development
Project locations: Mauritania (renewable energy); Benin (eggs production); Madagascar (sea farming); Senegal (health centres); Nigeria (recycling)
Media outlet: Internazionale (Italy) / Le Monde (France) / AFD (France) / I&P (France) / Proparco (France)

Project name: GMO’s to the rescue

Description: This project will try to show the potential of GMO’s in alleviating hunger and poverty
Project locations: Netherlands, Philippines, Bangladesh, United States
Media outlets: De Volkskrant, The Brave festival

Project name: Third World Treatments, First World Prices?

Description: Researching and comparing the prices of drugs and vaccines for the most common diseases.
Project locations: Europe, Brazil and Mali
Media outlets: 20 Minutos (Spain), Corriere de la Sera (Italy) and Cadena SER (Spain)

Project name: Graphic Memories

Description: A multimedia photo/graphic novel centred around 4 female former child soldiers.
Project locations: Urban and rural centres in northern Uganda (Gulu; Lira, Namakoro, and Patongo).
Media outlet: The Times and Die Zeit

Project name: On the Charcoal Trail

Description: A multimedia investigation into the billion dollar African charcoal trade
Project locations: Uganda, Kenya, UAE
Media outlet: The Guardian (online), Al Jazeera (online), New Internationalist (online)

Project name: Building Urban Resilience (Når bølgerne angriber)

Description: African megacities use contrasting development strategies to build resilience
Project locations: Lagos (Nigeria), Dar es Salaam (Tanzania) and Copenhagen (Denmark)
Media outlet: Politiken (pol.dk), Danish Broadcasting Corporation (dr.dk), Dagsavisen (Norway, dagsavisen.no), Al Jazeera (www.aljazeera.com/indepth/interactive), Mail & Guardian (mg.co.za)

Project name: Breaking Menstrual Taboos

Description: Breaking taboos regarding the monthly risks women in developing countries face.
Project locations: India, Nepal, Kenya, Uganda
Media outlets: WDR, ZDF/3Sat

Project name: Ndirande slum. Engine behind the Millennium Development Goals

Description: The project uncovers how slums can be an engine for poverty eradication.
Project locations: Ndirande slum, Malawi
Media outlets: Der Standard; Mediahuis; Neue Zurchter Zeitung; OneWorld; Luxemburger Wort; Trouw; Wereldpodium

The Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

 

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

EJC and local Kenyan partner AfricaonAir announced the winners of the first ever “Top Story” student investigative journalism competition in a gala award ceremony in the Rift Valley city of Nakuru on 18 October 2014. First place went to the team from Kenya Methodist University followed closely by the University of Nairobi. The top team was awarded a one-week media study visit.

A total of 65 Kenyan journalism students competed from 13 universities in reporting a mock scenario focused on white rhino poaching, a growing issue which afflicts many of the country’s game parks. Over three days the investigation brought the teams to various locations around the city, including Lake Nakuru National Park, home of most of the country’s remaining white rhino population.

Final submitted student team reportages were appraised by accomplished Kenyan journalists Rose Lukalo-Owino, Alex Chamwada and the BBC’s Dennis Okari. In their story evaluations judges took into account the level of journalistic professionalism, the correct use of sources, strong adherence to journalism ethics as well as thorough investigation of the story. The competition tested writing and interviewing style as well as featured embedded journalism ethical dilemmas and issues related to press freedom. Kenyan students all had the opportunity to enrich their university education by simulating the reality of the daily business of investigative journalists and submitting stories on deadline.

Students were mentored by AfricaonAir trainer Joseph Warungu along with KTN award-winning investigative reporter John Allan Namu. Simultaneously practical curriculum development workshops were arranged for professors from the competing universities and led by AfricaonAir experts.

The competition was first successfully initiated by EJC in Armenia in 2008 and is part of the EJC’ s five year Press Freedom 2.0 consortium global media development programming funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Kenya Methodist University took top prize in the first ever EJC student investigative journalism competition in Kenya
Kenya Methodist University took top prize in the first ever EJC student investigative journalism competition in Kenya: Edwin Ombiro Mercy Okinda Nelly Mukami Njue Janet Mwende Nzau Omenda Aswani Peter
The competition jury was represented by renown Kenyan journalists Dennis Okari, Rose Lukalo-Owino and Alex Chamwada.
The competition jury was represented by renown Kenyan journalists Dennis Okari, Rose Lukalo-Owino and Alex Chamwada.
Joseph Warungu (left) of AfricaonAir kicked off the competition and acted as student mentor.
Joseph Warungu (left) of AfricaonAir kicked off the competition and acted as student mentor.
Award winning Kenya Television Network (KTN) investigative journalist John Allan Namu mentored student teams during the competition.
Award winning Kenya Television Network (KTN) investigative journalist John Allan Namu mentored student teams during the competition.
Second place went to the team from University of Nairobi: Winnie Wambui Philip Maosa Rosemary Thuo Anthony KuriaDonald Nyokangi
Second place went to the team from University of Nairobi: Winnie Wambui Philip Maosa Rosemary Thuo Anthony Kuria Donald Nyokangi
EJC and AfricaonAir held curriculum development sessions with faculty from the participating journalism schools.
EJC and AfricaonAir held curriculum development sessions with faculty from the participating journalism schools.
BBC's Dennis Okari acted as competition juror and was on hand to present EJC/AfricaonAir certificates to participating students
BBC’s Dennis Okari acted as competition juror and was on hand to present EJC/AfricaonAir certificates to participating students
Students investigations took them to the Mama Ngina Primary school and interviews with teacher Martha Chebbe
Students investigations took them to the Mama Ngina Primary school and interviews with teacher Martha Chebbe
 Interviews in Lake Nakuru Park with Warden Carol Mwebia played a key role in the mock investigation
Interviews in Lake Nakuru Park with Warden Carol Mwebia played a key role in the mock investigation

Pictures by Sami Khan

Project:
Kenya: Raising Development Awareness Through the Media
The lack of in-depth, well-researched, and effective reporting on development issues in Kenya is weakening the media’s capacity to have an impact on the country’s political processes. EJC’s Kenya programme seeks to raise awareness to this problem, offering workshops dedicated to developing practical solutions by promoting relevant, powerful, and effective journalistic storytelling.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) and Google will hold its first News Impact Summit on Tuesday, 21 October 2014 in Vienna, Austria. Journalists, editors, newsroom managers, journalism trainers, and J-school students are invited to attend this free-of-charge public event.

This one-day event will shine a spotlight on the role of data and user generated content (UGC) in the news production process, and on how these shape the ways in which we tell stories. Big data and social networking platforms hold the potential for positively affecting how we cover breaking news, investigate complex issues, and interact with citizens in an open environment. Yet, the challenge is how we should effectively and efficiently apply these new techniques and available tools in our day-to-day work.

In partnership with Austria-based organisations including Der Standard, fjum, and Hack/Hackers Vienna, the event will feature speakers who are high-level journalism professionals, varying from major broadcast journalists to Austrian print managers, from social media news editors to data journalism practitioners. The event will include keynote speeches, panel discussions, and crash courses on a variety of topics such as Google advance search techniques for investigative reporting and the basics on crisis mapping. Participants will be given an opportunity to meet media professionals from numerous media organisations; the confirmed list of speakers includes David Schraven, Head of Investigation at Correct!v; Bella Hurrell, Deputy Editor of Visual Journalism at the BBC; Aine Kerr, Managing Editor at Storyful; and Nicholas Whitaker for the Google for Media team. There will be a number of networking opportunities with the delegates during lunch and reception, which will be open to all registered participants.

To register, visit: newsimpact.io
For further questions, contact us at: info@newsimpact.io

Project:
News Impact
The European Journalism Centre (EJC) and Google will hold its first News Impact Summit on Tuesday, 21 October 2014 in Vienna, Austria. Journalists, editors, newsroom managers, journalism trainers, and J-school students are invited to attend this free-of-charge public event.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 29, 2014

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is thrilled to announce that “Rebuilding Haiti”, an innovative newsgame supported by the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme, has just won an Online Journalism Award, in the explanatory reporting, small category.

This interactive piece, produced by a French team composed of Florent Maurin, Jean Abbiateci, Pierre Morel, Perceval Barrier and published on Rue89.fr uses a mixture of longform journalism, multimedia and gaming elements to help readers understand the problems facing Haiti after the 2010 earthquake.

According to Florent Maurin, the journalist and game designer behind the project, “this award is very important because it recognizes the quality of an unconventional project (here involving newsgaming) about a difficult topic (Haiti), which would have been very tough to produce within a newsroom, and without the support of the IDR Grant programme.”

“This award gives us even more motivation to experiment with new ways to tell meaningful stories, and the IDR Grant gave us the luxury to use this new type of storytelling, mixing newsgaming and traditional reporting,” says Jean Abbiateci, journalist on the project.

“We are running the IDR Grant programme to support and recognize journalists and media outlets working on global development topics in innovative ways, and it is crucial for us to get a distinction from such a renowned jury”, says Wilfried Ruetten, Director of the EJC.

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme (IDR) was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to award funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the EJC awarded 41 grants, and is currently reviewing the shortlisted applications for the fourth round of grants. The winners will be announced in November 2014. A showcase of these projects can be seen here.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries.

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

EJC announced the winners of the second annual Bolivian Student Investigative Journalism Competition 2014 in La Paz 26 August in cooperation with local project partner Asociacion Boliviana de Carreras de Comunicacion Social (ABOCCS).

Of the 14 competing Aboccs member universities, it was the three students from Universidad Autónoma Gabriel René Moreno of Santa Cruz that came out on top this year, with the University of San Simon Cochabamba running a close second. The two top teams were awarded week-long paid internships at leading Bolivian print publications where they will work on actual reporting assignments with opportunities for publication.

Final submitted student team reportages were appraised by Bolivian print journalist luminaries Roberto Navia (El Deber), Elizabeth Arrazola (Los Tiempos) and Miguel Gomez Balboa (La Razon). In their story evaluations judges took into account the level of journalistic professionalism, the correct use of sources, strong adherence to journalism ethics as well as thorough investigation of the story.

Over 50 students and journalism coaches from across Bolivia participated in the three-day simulated mock investigative journalism competition that took place on the streets of La Paz. The theme this year focused on the growing problem of teenage human-trafficking in the country. The competition tested writing and interviewing style as well as featured embedded lessons in journalism ethics and issues related to press freedom. Bolivian students all had the opportunity to enrich their university education by simulating the reality of the daily business of investigative journalists and submitting stories on deadline.

The competition was first successfully initiated by EJC in Armenia in 2008 and is part of the EJC’ s five year Press Freedom 2.0 consortium global media development programming funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Students from Universidad Autónoma Gabriel René Moreno of Santa Cruz were this year's Student Investigative Journalism Competition winners: Claudia Santa Cruz Montoya, Natalia Anez Zabala and Daniela Pillon Rivero. All three received certificates of achievement and will intern at a major Bolivian publication later this year.
Students from Universidad Autónoma Gabriel René Moreno of Santa Cruz were this year’s Student Investigative Journalism Competition winners: Claudia Santa Cruz Montoya, Natalia Anez Zabala and Daniela Pillon Rivero. All three received certificates of achievement and will intern at a major Bolivian publication later this year.

Jurors this year included Bolivian print journalists Roberto Navia (El Deber), Elizabeth Arrazola (Los Tiempos) and Miguel Gomez Balboa (La Razon).
Jurors this year included Bolivian print journalists Roberto Navia (El Deber), Elizabeth Arrazola (Los Tiempos) and Miguel Gomez Balboa (La Razon).

Argentine investigative journalist Miguel Winazki (Left) and Ernest Sotomayor (3rd from right) of Columbia University Journalism School both participated in the competition opening event along with current Aboccs President Rafael Loayza (3rd from left).
Argentine investigative journalist Miguel Winazki (Left) and Ernest Sotomayor (3rd from right) of Columbia University Journalism School both participated in the competition opening event along with current Aboccs President Rafael Loayza (3rd from left).

EJC enlisted local
EJC enlisted local “actors’ who played themselves utilizing scripts for the student interviews, which formed a core component of the mock investigation

Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

Amid censorship, arrests of journalists and a steady flow of government propaganda, one news outlet in Zimbabwe is boldly getting on with business, writes Don Podesta in a report for the Center for International Media Assistance. That outlet is The Source - Business and Finance News for Zimbabwe.

“We are not an underground service,” says Nelson Banya, a former Reuters correspondent who is now the top editor. “We are registered. We comply with the law… Our strength is that economic news is kind of viewed as less threatening.”

View article

The Source officially launched in partnership with EJC and the Thomson Reuters Foundation in October 2013 and is an independent news service owned and operated by Zimbabweans. By creating an accurate and informed flow of financial and business news coverage and analysis, The Source aspires to be part of Zimbabwe’s economic development story, serving national media outlets, financial organisations, potential foreign investors and citizens alike.

Project:
Zimbabwe: Establishing the Country’s First Independent Financial News Service
Believing Zimbabwe can boost its own economic development by increasing awareness and improving citizens’ general knowledge of financial matters, we have sought, together with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, to establish the country’s first source of accurate, sustainable, and independent financial and economic news, owned and operated by Zimbabweans.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

July 24, 2014

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is thrilled to announce that it has received over 250 applications in the fourth round of the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme.

Over the next eight weeks, the EJC will evaluate the entries and inform all applicants of the status of their application(s). Due to the large number of submissions, we will however not be able to give individual feedback to unsuccessful candidates. Shortlisted applicants will then have one month’s time to submit a complete proposal and provide any necessary supporting documents. The grants winners will be announced in November.

Interested journalists, who did not get around to pitching their development reporting idea in time should stay tuned for updates about the next submission deadline:

“In common agreement with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, we are very optimistic we will continue this grant programme next year. Stay tuned for updates, as the next submission deadline is likely to be announced at the end of 2014. Seeing the immense and authentic interest from media houses and freelance journalists to play a greater role when it comes to social change, we think it is crucial to continue supporting this field”, says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme (IDR) was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, to award funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility. Since 2013 the EJC awarded 41 grants. A showcase of these projects can be seen here.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

EJC recently implemented consecutive journalism training workshops in Kenya 14 - 18 July that highlighted the added value of using data in stories production. With so much information being put online by the Kenyan government and newly constituted counties, journalists can often be overwhelmed by how to access, interpret, verify and finally visualize data in order to strengthen their stories. Currently, there are very few examples, even in major Kenyan print media, of journalists regularly using data to enhance their stories.

Hivos Kenya Media Programme

In partnership with the Kenya Media Programme of Hivos, EJC sought to tackle this issue through a three day workshop in Machakos County outside of Nairobi 14 - 16 July. Working with veteran EJC trainer, Peter Verweij of D3-Media the nine Kenyan journalists, who a month earlier attended a purely technical training on data, were guided and coached to produce actual story outputs using tools they had learned on locating, scraping and analyzing proper data sets. The journalists—representing major media institutions such as The Nation, The Standard and KBC and also smaller regional outlets such as The Kilifian and Maata Radio from the Kenyan coast—focused their reportages on pressing development topics and often those at the regional/county levels: cattle rustling impacts on educational outcomes, county government budgets oversight, and health issues such as the correlation between male circumcision and HIV infection rates.

AfricaonAir

EJC also partnered with AfricaonAir (AoA) on a practical training in Nairobi later that week titled “Reporting on County Development News”. Led by AoA Director Joseph Warungu, local trainer Caleb Atemi and EJC’s Peter Verweij, the three day program targeted print correspondents from usually under-represented regional Kenyan cities such as Laikipia, Makueni, Bomet, Busia, Migori, Taita, Transmara and Kericho. Participants were introduced to development journalism reporting in the context of covering county government. The workshop also included a full day led by Verweij, who provided the group with basic data journalism skills building. EJC’s work with AoA is part of our five year programming through the Press Freedom 2.0 consortium supported by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

EJC partnered with the Hivos' Kenya Media Programme to implement the three day 'New Media and Data Journalism which took place east of Nairobi in Machakos County 14 -16 July
EJC partnered with the Hivos’ Kenya Media Programme to implement the three day ‘New Media and Data Journalism which took place east of Nairobi in Machakos County 14 -16 July
Kenyan journalists were given individual classroom assessments by EJC trainer Peter Verweij on the caliber of their data collection and visualization techniques.
Kenyan journalists were given individual classroom assessments by EJC trainer Peter Verweij on the caliber of their data collection and visualization techniques.
Participants were required to pitch their stories and how data was being used to strengthen it, to critiques by EJC trainer and peer review by their journalist colleagues.
Participants were required to pitch their stories and how data was being used to strengthen it, to critiques by EJC trainer and peer review by their journalist colleagues.
After three intense days of analyzing and embedding relevant data into their reportages, participants earned a Kenya Media Programme-EJC Certificate of Course Completion
After three intense days of analyzing and embedding relevant data into their reportages, participants earned a Kenya Media Programme-EJC Certificate of Course Completion
EJC's local partner in Kenya, AfricaonAir (AoA), implemented
EJC’s local partner in Kenya, AfricaonAir (AoA), implemented “Reporting County Development News” 16-18 July at AoA offices in Nairobi with 10 regional correspondents participating—pictured here with trainer Caleb Atemi.

Project:
Kenya: Raising Development Awareness Through the Media
The lack of in-depth, well-researched, and effective reporting on development issues in Kenya is weakening the media’s capacity to have an impact on the country’s political processes. EJC’s Kenya programme seeks to raise awareness to this problem, offering workshops dedicated to developing practical solutions by promoting relevant, powerful, and effective journalistic storytelling.

In cooperation with Paradox Zero, the European Journalism Centre (EJC) in Maastricht is releasing a Portuguese translation of its Verification Handbook.

The Verification Handbook provides different techniques for verifying UGC and various detailed case studies, for times of crises when big amounts of user-generated content are created and it is imperative to have verification methods at hand to determine truthful sources and the validity of UGC items. The Handbook includes the expertise of journalists and practitioners from renowned media and humanitarian organizations, such as BBC, The Guardian, Amnesty International, ABC, The Poynter Institute, GigaOM, the Qatar Foundation’s Computing research Institute (QCRI), the Internews Center for Innovation and Learning, OpenStreetMap, the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC) or WITNESS.

With the release of the Portuguese version, and thereby the first official translation since the release of the Verification Handbook itself, the Handbook aims to expands its reach to a broader audience for more opportunities in the fields of academia, local organizations and civil society such as law enforcement.

The translated version was produced in an effort between the European Journalism Centre (EJC) and Paradox Zero in collaboration with Luísa Ferreira, Paulo Rebêlo and Moreno Osorio. Published on Tuesday 1 July 2014, the Portuguese translation is available online as PDF, Kindle and EPUB versions.

Website: www.verificationhandbook.com/book_br/

About Paradox Zero

Paradox Zero specializes in communication and digital strategies and embedded technologies for small and medium companies. It is located both in Brasilia and Recife, within the neighborhood of Brazil’s biggest tech park “Porto Digital”.

For more information in Portuguese, contact:

Rafaela Morais
Tel: +55 (61) 4042-3280 // (81) 3019-3811 // (81) 9753-4200
Email: rafaela@paradoxzero.com

Paulo Rebêlo
Tel: +55 (11) 3280-4139 // (81) 3019-3811 // (81) 9363-9779
Email: rebelo@paradoxzero.com

For more information in English, please contact:

Rina Tsubaki
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

 

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

The Source, Zimbabwe’s first independent financial news service, held its first public event to showcase its journalistic output to a wide array of stakeholders including local media, ministry officials, international donors and diplomatic corps at the Bronte Hotel in downtown Harare 20 June, 2014. Over 80 guests attended the black tie affair which included presentations by The Source editor-in-chief Nelson Banya, as well as a keynote speech by Zimbabwean Minister of Finance, Patrick Chinamasa.

The news agency, operated by Zimbabweans, serves the local media, financial organisations, potential investors and ordinary citizens by providing them with trusted content.

The Source editor-in-chief Nelson Banya said the news agency sought to fill a gap in the market for “quality” economic information. “Partly as a consequence of the economic and political crisis that Zimbabwe went through between 2000 and 2009, there was a gap in the market certainly in the media industry,” he said.

“It’s the first private, independent financial and business news agency with a reputation for fact-based reporting and allowing a platform to exchange views,” said Chairman of The Source, Cris Chinaka

The Source, which was established last year with the technical assistance of the Thomson Reuters Foundation and the European Journalism Centre, went live eight months ago.

The Source: http://source.co.zw

Nelson Banya, Editor-in-Chief of The Source discussed fact-based reporting as the core journalistic values of the news service
Nelson Banya, editor-in-chief of The Source discussed fact-based reporting as the core journalistic values of the news service

Representatives from local media and the diplomatic community attended the event.
Representatives from local media and the diplomatic community attended the event.
Zimbabwean Finance Minister, Patrick Chinamasa, called on for factual and responsible reporting on economic issues during his keynote address
Zimbabwean Finance Minister, Patrick Chinamasa, called for responsible reporting on economic issues during his keynote address
Guest of honour, Securities and Exchange Commission of Zimbabwe chief executive, Tafadzwa Chinamo said the media plays a critical role in disseminating information.
Guest of honour, Securities and Exchange Commission of Zimbabwe chief executive, Tafadzwa Chinamo said the media plays a critical role in disseminating information.
European Journalism Centre and Thomson Reuters Foundation partner together on a technical level with The Source.
European Journalism Centre and Thomson Reuters Foundation partner together on a technical level with The Source.

Project:
Zimbabwe: Establishing the Country’s First Independent Financial News Service
Believing Zimbabwe can boost its own economic development by increasing awareness and improving citizens’ general knowledge of financial matters, we have sought, together with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, to establish the country’s first source of accurate, sustainable, and independent financial and economic news, owned and operated by Zimbabweans.

Nino Zuriashvili of Studio Monitor was awarded the third annual EJC sponsored GIPA-Friedman prize for her hard-hitting three-part TV documentary series “Imereti Rich and Poor” which documents the economic, social and environmental problems of the silicomanganese industry in Georgia at a ceremony in Tbilisi 5 June, 2014.

Special awards for innovation in investigative journalism were given to Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project journalists Lasha Kveseladze (for data) and Nino Bakradze ( for multi-media presentation).

Pulitzer Prize winning journalist and former professor at Columbia Graduate School of Journalism Josh Friedman awarded the prizes at the roundtable event at the Frontline Club along with Netherlands Ambassador Hans Horbach and EJC Country Manager Josh LaPorte.

Over 30 submissions were received by the prize jury which examined the stories for investigative professionalism, research, innovation, societal impact and ethics. Past winners have included Nana Biganishvili (2012) and Nana Naskidashvili (2013).

EJC and local project partner, the Georgian Institute of Public Affairs, established the GIPA-Friedman prize in 2012 to honor excellence in investigative journalism in Georgia. It is part of EJC’s five year commitment in Georgia as a member of the Press Freedom 2.0 consortium which includes other Dutch-based civil society organisations Free Press Unlimited and Mensen met een Missie and funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.

Nino Zuriashvili of Studio Monitor receives the third annual GIPA-Friedman Prize from the awards namesake, Pulitzer prize winning journalism Josh Friedman
Nino Zuriashvili of Studio Monitor receives the third annual GIPA-Friedman Prize from the awards namesake, Pulitzer prize winning journalism Josh Friedman

Lasha Kveseladze of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project received a special innovation award through his utilization of data.
Lasha Kveseladze of the Organized Crime and Corruption Reporting Project received a special innovation award through his utilization of data.
Netherlands Ambassador Hans Horbach presents the special innovation award for multi-media presentation to Nino Bakradze of newscafe.ge
Netherlands Ambassador Hans Horbach presents the special innovation award for multi-media presentation to Nino Bakradze of newscafe.ge


The prize ceremony was preceded by a roundtable discussion on press freedom in Georgia led by Josh Friedman and Ambassador Hans Horbach
The prize ceremony was preceded by a roundtable discussion on press freedom in Georgia led by Josh Friedman and Ambassador Hans Horbach


Nino Zuriashvili of Studio Monitor’s winning production “Imereti Rich and Poor” aired in Georgia on Maestro TV.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aw3FwdMAdDA (English subtitles)
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=a6ZXuuHkLwk (English subtitles)
https://www.youtube./watch?v=MjOMJ8rzOKk (English subtitles)

Project:
Georgia: Finances and Transparency - New Approaches for Georgian Journalism
Addressing a Georgian-specific problem, namely the absence of investigative coverage of economic corruption issues, the project's objective is to promote excellence in journalism by instituting a competition on the national level. Our work in Georgia also involves journalistic capacity building through training, developed in cooperation with local institutions and international organisations.

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
May 21, 2014

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce the winners of the third round of its Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme.

Thirteen outstanding projects will be awarded a combined total of 233.000,00 Euros in funding to innovate global development narratives and bring to the public new forms of journalistic storytelling centered on the Millennium Development Goals. An advisory council of senior journalists oversaw the final decisions of the awards. The third round of the grant programme ran from 5 September 2013 to 26 February 2014 and received over 300 applications.

The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets targeting audiences in France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

Funded topics will focus on issues such as: new technologies in Africa, water issues in Latin America, China’s development aid in Africa, the growth of African natural resources boom towns, the impact of transport infrastructure quality in Nigeria, the activities of Italian mafias in Africa, the development of the world’s fastest growing cities, international aid transparency, the impact of new technologies on agriculture, water issues in Bolivia, the impact of climate change in Jakarta, the use of fertilizer in Africa, maternal health and family planning in Afghanistan.

The winning teams will employ multi-platform approaches, engage in cross-country media collaboration and make use of interactive applications, as well as investigative, data-driven and photo journalism. The projects will be released in the form of cross-platform storytelling that includes: TV and web documentaries, animated and interactive maps, multimedia and graphic features, mobile applications, and animated videos. Various social media tools will also be used extensively.

The quality of the winning projects and the amount of applications we received shows that the community of global development journalists and editors is growing. They use innovative storytelling tools, data, and run large scale international investigations, probably the most innovative journalism field right now!” says EJC Director Wilfried Rütten.

To structure this growing community and allow its members to share ideas, best practices and collaborate, the EJC is hosting a grantees meeting this June in Barcelona. This event will see the reunion of the winnersof all three rounds of IDR grants, the presentations of the most successful projects supported, and a fewworkshops led by international experts on how to best manage a grant, how to guarantee the impact of a story, how to run international collaborations

The EJC will run one more round of applications in 2014. The next deadline coming up is on the 23rd of July 2014 (22:00 CET). Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes can pitch their stories via the online application form . For questions, check the FAQ guide or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

The winners for this round are:

Project name: Connecting Africa

Description: Print and Scrollytelling project aims to show how a new generation of Africans are boosting new strategies to democratize the access to technology and improve the conditions of living of the inhabitants of the continent.
Project locations: Kenya, Ghana, Tanzania, South Africa, Namibia
Media outlet: La Repubblica, El Periodico de Catalunya (Italy, Spain)
Journalist(s): Jeronimo Giorgi, Angelo Attanasio

Project name: China’s train to African development

Description: A comparison of the impact of Chinese and Western development aid.
Project locations: Bujumbura, Kigali, Kampala, Nairobi and Mombasa
Media outlet(s): La Vanguardia (Spain)
Journalist(s): Xavier Mas de Xaxas

Project name: Boom and Bust on an emerging continent

Description: Data driven and multimedia project on the growth of natural resources boom towns in Africa.
Project locations: Geita, Tanzania; Solwezi, Zambia; Tortiya and Bouaflé, Ivory Coast; Tete, Mozambique
Media outlet(s): The Economist, The Guardian (UK)
Journalist(s): Aaron Ross

Project name: The Water Fund: Spain supplies Latin America

Description: Data driven project focusing on how the Spanish International cooperation Agency and the World Bank have improved water supply in 19 countries in Latin America through the “Water Fund” program.
Project locations: Latin America
Media outlet(s): El Confidencial, La Nacion (Spain, Argentina)
Journalist(s): Jesus Escudero

Project name: The impact of infrastructure on Nigeria’s development

Description: An interactive web documentary and radio series will follow the lives of those who are affected by access to transportation infrastructure in Nigeria
Project locations: Nigeria
Media outlet(s): Deutsche Welle (Germany)
Journalist(s): Damon van Der Linde

Project name: Italian organized crime’s investments in the African continent: an interactive analysis

Description: The project will investigate, map, analyse and visualize Italian mafias’ investments and money laundering practices in Africa, and how has this changed African precarious economies and impacted poor communities
Project locations: Egypt, Tunisia, Mauritania, Gabon, Angola, Namibia and South Africa
Media outlet(s): Quattrogatti.info , IRPI (Investigative reporting project Italy) (Italy)
Journalist(s): Stefano Gurciullo

Project name: Future Cities

Description: Future Cities is a journalistic project devoted to the people,
urban life and the stories behind the statistics
in Kinshasa, Lima, Bogota, Yangon, Teheran and Luanda.
Project locations: Kinshasa, Lima, Bogota, Yangon, Teheran and Luanda
Media outlet(s): De Volkskrant (The Netherlands)
Journalist(s): Stephanie Bakker

Project name: Follow the Money 2

Description: Follow the Money 2 aims to continue the project “Follow the Money” (http://journalismgrants.org/showcase/follow-the-money/) begun in 2013 by La Stampa, which has opened an important debate on the issues of cooperation and inaugurated La Stampa’s new Development Cooperation section.
Project locations: Ethiopia, Mozambique, Kenya, Ecuador, Palestine, Indonesia
Media outlet(s): La Stampa (Italy)
Journalist(s): Emanuele Bompan

Project name: Green ICTs in African lands. A new agricultural revolution?

Description: The project will consist in an online platform, an interactive crowdmap, a series of online documentaries with audio clips and articles, mapping and analysing the success of ICT for agriculture projects.
Project locations: Italy, Netherlands, Senegal, Ghana, Uganda and Kenya
Media outlet(s): Wired Italy, L’Espresso, Repubblica.it, Che Futuro, Volontari per lo Sviluppo, QCode Magazine (Italy)
Journalist(s): Elisabetta Demartis

Project name: Bolivia’s everyday water war

Description: interactive documentary following the everyday strains of local residents, analyzing the changes in international aid over the last twenty years and their consequences in accessing safe water.
Project locations: Bolivia
Media outlet(s): L’Espresso, Zeit Online, Tagesspiegel (Italy, Germany)
Journalist(s): Michele Bertelli

Project name: De Grote Watermuur (The Giant Seawall)

Description: Multimedia Lifebook revealing the consequences of climate change for Jakarta residents.
Project locations: Penjaringan and Pluit in Northern Jakarta
Media outlet(s): National Geographic (The Netherlands, Belgium)
Journalist(s): Cynthia Boll

Project name: Why is fertilizer so scarce in Africa?

Description: This project will analyse why fertilizer has transformed farming in nations like India, reducing hunger and improving prosperity, and is not yet massively used in African countries like Uganda and Malawi.
Project locations: Uganda, Malawi
Media
outlet(s): The Guardian, Nature (UK)
Journalist(s): Natasha Gilbert

Project name: Fighting Maternal Deaths with Faith

Description: This project will follow one imam and his wife near Mazar e Sharif as they train and dispense contraception to their community in a society plagued by poverty, cultural restrictions, and limited access to healthcare. The multimedia package will include a 2000-word story, a 12-minute video essay, a photo slideshow and a travel blog.
Project locations: Afghanistan
Media outlet(s): The Guardian
Journalist(s): Maeva Bambuck

The Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

From 30 April through 8 May EJC implemented a series of workshops across Bolivia led by EJC trainer Oliver Wates on ‘Reporting Development Issues’ as well as a fourth phase of training the future teachers of local partner Fundacion para el Periodismo (FPP). In the Bolivian Amazon city of Trinidad, site visits to local development projects were embedded in the program that resulted in local story production of under-reported topics.

FPP’s core group of future journalism teachers participated in the fourth level of EJC-led teacher training.

The practical workshop in El Alto was held at the headquarters of the El Alto Journalists Union and included intensive mock story production sessions.
EJC's 'Reporting Development Issues' is our first course implemented in the politically important La Paz suburb of El Alto. Participants came from local media including La Patria, Radio Metropolitana, PADEM, Radionoticias, Canal 15, and Canal 33.
EJC’s ‘Reporting Development Issues’ is our first course implemented in the politically important La Paz suburb of El Alto. Participants came from local media including La Patria, Radio Metropolitana, PADEM, Radionoticias, Canal 15, and Canal 33.
EJC Training Awarding EJC certificate
Participants in El Alto received joint EJC-FPP course completion certificates.

Participants in Trinidad came from local media including La Palabra del Beni, Radio Tropico, Diario Contacto, Canal 27, Canal 57
Participants in Trinidad came from local media including La Palabra del Beni, Radio Tropico, Diario Contacto, Canal 27, Canal 57


The Trinidad program included a site visit to Centro de Investigation de Recursos Acuaticos where a fish farm project works to diversify the economy away from cattle grazing which often leads to deforestation.
The farm produced 22 tons of fish in 2013.
The farm produced 22 tons of fish in 2013.

Stories on workshop development topics appeared in the local press throughout the week.
Stories on workshop development topics appeared in the local press throughout the week.
http://issuu.com/lapalabradelbeni/docs/lpb_08052014?e=3083264/7777783

http://issuu.com/lapalabradelbeni/docs/lpb_09052014?e=3083264/7793199


Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

The European Journalism Centre, in cooperation with the School of Journalism Mass Communications οf Aristotle University of Thessaloniki, Greece, the School of Communications, Dublin City University, Ireland and the Regional Press Institute, Greece are launching the International Summer School in Environmental Journalism and Communication (ISSEJC), an intensive training programme at graduate level in Chania, Island of Crete, Greece from 21 – 30 July 2014.

The school aims to advance the public awareness and understanding of environmental issues and policies by enhancing the quality, range, depth and validity of communication and journalistic coverage. Bringing together a wide range of stakeholders - scholars, students, professionals, policy-makers and environmental scientists – it seeks to improve the knowledge, abilities and skills of both professional and emerging journalists. Students will be trained to report on environmental issues based on the methodical understanding of the connections between media, economy, culture and environment, as well as between local, peripheral and global contexts. Special emphasis will be given to the media’s role in shaping social values and attitudes in relation to the environment, as well as to its critical contribution in advancing civic awareness and engagement with the issue of sustainable development.

The International Summer School on Environmental Journalism and Communication provides a unique opportunity for training in small, friendly groups, while at the same time enjoying the sights and culture of Crete in summer. Within the framework of this educational programme and its hands-on approach, the participants will produce journalistic reports on what they observe and experience.Participants will engage in group discussions , Q & A sessions, seminars and workshops, and will be given the opportunity to network with researchers, professionals and practitioners in the field. The ISSEJS actions and derivatives will be publicised in an electronic volume that will include all of the papers and applied exercises produced and presented by the participants.

Upon completion of the ISSEJS the participants receive Certificate of Attendance and Participation.

For more information, contact: Dr Antonis Skamnakis, Assistant Professor, SJM AUTh (askamnak@jour.auth.gr) and Dr Clio Kenterelidou, Tenured Senior Teaching Fellow and Instructor, SJMC – AUTh (ckent@jour.auth.gr) or visit the website.

Project:
International Summer School on Environmental Journalism and Communication
The school aims to advance the public awareness and understanding of environmental issues and policies by enhancing the quality, range, depth and validity of communication and journalistic coverage. Bringing together a wide range of stakeholders - scholars, students, professionals, policy-makers and environmental scientists.

The European Journalism Centre

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

April 9, 2014

Maastricht, The Netherlands: The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is looking for partner organisations around the world interested in hosting local learning groups for its free online data journalism course Doing Journalism with Data: First Steps, Skills and Tools, which will officially start on May 19, 2014.

This introductory course, launching in cooperation with the Canvas Network by Instructure, is already the largest massive open online course (MOOC) on the topic of journalism to date, with over 16.000 registered participants. It consists of five modules, and is designed to teach students the essential concepts, techniques and skills to effectively work with data, and to produce compelling stories under tight deadlines.

The local learning groups are aimed to further engage and provide hands-on support to participants in this global course. Groups are to be organised, hosted and facilitated by the partner organisations, which are to provide course participants with a physical meeting space, equipped with an Internet connection, once a week throughout the five week duration of the course.

Partner organisations are also expected to provide a facilitator with expertise in data journalism, whose role is to moderate discussions and answer questions. Local learning group meetings can be organized around the course materials, tutoring, or projects that put into practice what has been learned during the course.

The EJC will list all partner organisations and their logos on the course website, and will provide partners with the list of names and email addresses of course participants who registered for their learning group. It will also provide an online location where students can meet virtually, and will facilitate reaching out to registered participants so that they are made aware of the learning groups in their community and can join them.

Confirmed partners so far include:

- IHECS - Apache (Brussels, Belgium)
- FJUM Wien (Vienna, Austria)
- University of Hong Kong (Pokfulam, Hongkong)
- Coventry University (Coventry, United Kingdom)
- Open Knowledge Brasil / Escola de Dados (São Paulo, Brazil)

Participants can sign up as for their respective local learning groups here.

###

Contact:

Arne Grauls
Project Manager, Data Journalism Course
European Journalism Centre
Email: grauls@ejc.net

Other useful links:
- Course website
- Course introduction video
- Meet the instructors video
- Course Registration page

About

This project is part of the European Journalism Centre’s Data Driven Journalism initiative, which aims to enable more journalists, editors, news developers and designers to make better use of data and incorporate it further into their work. Started in 2010, the initiative also runs the website DataDrivenJournalism.net as well as the School of Data Journalism, and produced the acclaimed Data Journalism Handbook.

 

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

From 24-26 March, EJC implemented a practical training workshop in Nairobi for Kenyan journalists focused on health and development issues in collaboration with local project partner AfricaonAir. A total of 12 reporters from Nairobi, Mombasa, Nakuru, Kakamega and Mwingi participated representing media houses such as The Star newspaper, Nation Media Group, African Woman and Child Feature Services, The Standard Group, Kitui The People and Pwani FM. The workshop was led by AfricaonAir director Joseph Warungu and EJC trainer Hamadou Tidaine Sy and featured guest speaker Otula Owuor, a veteran Kenyan journalist, former Science Editor for the Daily Nation and currently the editor of Science Africa. Included in the itinerary was a reportage field visit to the Kenya Medical Research Institute (KEMRI) in Nairobi, the national body responsible for overseeing all health research in Kenya. The participants were briefed by the KEMRI director and other senior scientists and then toured the production facility as well as three of their labs that deal with Polio, HIV and herbal medicine.

EJC/AfricaonAir trainers, participants and staff from the Kenyan Medical Research Institute
EJC/AfricaonAir trainers, participants and staff from the Kenyan Medical Research Institute

Participants interview staff at the Kenyan Medical Research Institute
Participants interview staff at the Kenyan Medical Research Institute

EJC/AfricaonAir trainers, participants and staff from the Kenyan Medical Research Institute
EJC/AfricaonAir trainers, participants and staff from the Kenyan Medical Research Institute
Participants receive EJC-AfricaonAir certificates of course completion
Participants receive EJC-AfricaonAir certificates of course completion
Participants receive EJC-AfricaonAir certificates of course completion
Participants receive EJC-AfricaonAir certificates of course completion
Kenyan health and science journalist Otula Ouwor spoke to participants at the training facilities of AfricaonAir in downtown Nairobi
Kenyan health and science journalist Otula Ouwor spoke to participants at the training facilities of AfricaonAir in downtown Nairobi
Kenyan health and science journalist Otula Ouwor spoke to participants at the training facilities of AfricaonAir in downtown Nairobi
AfricaonAir’s Joseph Warungu and EJC’s Hamadou Tidiane Sy led the three day course.



Project:
Kenya: Raising Development Awareness Through the Media
The lack of in-depth, well-researched, and effective reporting on development issues in Kenya is weakening the media’s capacity to have an impact on the country’s political processes. EJC’s Kenya programme seeks to raise awareness to this problem, offering workshops dedicated to developing practical solutions by promoting relevant, powerful, and effective journalistic storytelling.

The European Journalism Centre

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

March 5, 2014

Maastricht, The Netherlands: The European Journalism Centre (EJC), in cooperation with the Canvas Network by Instructure, is pleased to announce that its free online data journalism course ‘Doing Journalism with Data: First Steps, Skills and Tools’ will officially start on May 19, 2014. With more than 14.000 participants, this five-module introductory course is the largest massive open online course (MOOC) on the topic of journalism to date.

The course is part of the European Journalism Centre’s Data Driven Journalism initiative, which aims to enable more journalists, editors, news developers and designers to make better use of data and incorporate it further into their work. Started in 2010, the initiative also runs the website DataDrivenJournalism.net as well as the School of Data Journalism, and produced the acclaimedData Journalism Handbook.

Participants will learn the essential concepts and skills to work effectively with data and produce compelling stories under tight deadlines from a stellar line-up of instructors and advisors from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism, the New York Times, ProPublica, Wired, Twitter, La Nacion Argentina, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Zeit Online, and others. The five instructors: Simon Rogers, Paul Bradshaw, Steve Doig, Nicolas Kayser-Bril, and Alberto Cairo, introduce themselves and the course in this short video: https://vimeo.com/85257034.

About the EJC: The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media in the interest of a functioning democratic public sphere. This mission has two main aspects: safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and the world, as well as media freedom in emerging and developing countries. The EJC is supported by Google, the Dutch Ministry of Education, and the African Media Initiative.

About Instructure: Instructure is a technology company committed to improving education. Instructure provides instructors and students modern tools and resources that empower and simplify the learning experience. Instructure offers Canvas, the open, easy-to-use, cloud-native learning management system, as well as Canvas Network, an index of open, online courses by educators everywhere, from Ivy League institutions to community colleges.

Sponsors: Google; Ministry of Education, Culture and Science of the Netherlands; African Media Initiative.

- Data Journalism Course website
- Course registration page

###

Contact:

Arne Grauls
Project Manager, Data Journalism Course
European Journalism Centre
Email: grauls@ejc.net

Devin Knighton
Director of Public Relations
Instructure
Email: devin@instructure.com

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE

February 28, 2014

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is thrilled to announce that it has received over 300 applications in the third round of the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme.

Over the next four weeks, the EJC will evaluate the entries and inform all applicants of the status of their application(s). Due to the large number of submissions, we will however not be able to give individual feedback to unsuccessful candidates. Shortlisted applicants will have one month’s time to submit a complete proposal and provide any necessary supporting documents. The grants will be announced at the end of May.

“We are also happy to announce that, in light of new data from the Organisation for Economic Co-operation and Development (OECD) regarding development aid spending, and in common agreement with the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation, we are extending the list of eligible countries to now also include Denmark. We are extremely pleased to welcome Denmark aboard and are confident that Danish media will show high interest in covering global development stories”, says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten.

Interested journalists, who did not get around to pitching their development reporting idea in time should keep the next submission deadline in mind. The fourth deadline to apply is on 23rd July 2014 (22:00 CET). Applications can be submitted online here.

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme (IDR) was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. A selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility will be awarded funding aimed to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage. In 2013 the EJC awarded 28 grants. A showcase of these projects can be seen here.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Launched in October 2013, a new independent financial and business news service called ‘the Source’ is thriving in Zimbabwe. Supported by Thomson Reuters Foundation and the European Journalism Centre, the Source provides citizens, media organisations, and potential investors in Zimbabwe with greater access to financial and business news and analysis.

We spoke to Editor in Chief Nelson Banya about the challenges of telling a complex economic story in a difficult climate.

Why was the Source launched?

Until recently, there was little quality information on Zimbabwe’s economy. A year-long study by Thomson Reuters Foundation showed that policy makers, investors and some media organisations would welcome a service providing trusted economic, business and financial content. Given the political crisis Zimbabwe has gone through since 2000, the country’s media tended to focus on the political story. But the formation of a power-sharing government between long-ruling President Robert Mugabe and the opposition Movement for Democratic Change (MDC) in 2009 put the focus more on the prospects for reconstruction. We think we can contribute by providing quality information to those who need to make sound investment decisions on Zimbabwe.

What is the impact?

With our national network of stringers, we look beyond the capital to provide much broader economic coverage, including exclusive content from previously ignored zones of economic activity. We aim to shine a spotlight on the economic fortunes of farming, mining and tourism areas which do not make everyday news. The Source will promote debate on economic policy as the government and business try to set a clear direction for the recovering economy. Our reports are also starting to enrich the economic pages of newspapers, websites and radio stations.

Why is it important to tell “the often complex economic story of Zimbabwe?”

A protracted political and economic crisis, which according to the IMF peaked with hyperinflation at an astounding 500 billion percent in December 2008, makes Zimbabwe’s a rather complex story to tell. At the same time, it has to be told accurately, dispassionately and fast, if the information is to serve ordinary citizens, policy makers and business leaders. More important, given Zimbabwe’s dire need for foreign investment to revive its economy, a business news service has to provide trusted information for external investors. The key sectors – mining, manufacturing, infrastructure and the financial sector – need up to $45 billion in investment for the country to achieve sustained growth. Given the lack of capital in the country, such funding can only come from outside and will only come from investors who have quality information.

The Source also intends to shed light on the regulatory environment. This is very important, considering the impact of a 2008 law limiting foreign ownership to 49 percent in any major investment in Zimbabwe, especially in mines. Mugabe’s seizure of white-owned farms from 2000 to resettle landless blacks disrupted the economy, unsettled investors and worsened the foreign investment climate. But the government appears to be more flexible in applying the 2008 firm ownership law, and this gives us the chance to shed light on the nuances of the ownership policy.

The Source has a key role to play in debating all policies that impact foreign investment. For instance, highlighting the impact of the current policy - de-investment, company closures and job losses – helps government to consider policy adjustment or changes. Experts writing opinion columns for the Source can also debate the merits of these policies, potentially influencing government policy to improve the foreign investment climate.

What are the day-to-day challenges of reporting the news in Zimbabwe?

In 2002, Zimbabwe adopted tough media laws, including a criminal defamation clause that has seen several journalists arraigned before the courts. This has created a pervasive climate of fear and has been used by public officials, and some business executives, to keep probing journalists in check.

A journalist working in Zimbabwe also has to contend with a lack of credible official statistics, especially on key economic indicators. One example is the unemployment figure, which the official state statistics agency insists is 11 percent, while most independent economists put it much higher at 80-90 percent. The poor data is, in part, a result of the hyperinflationary period, when the government simply stopped publicizing statistics it thought reflected badly on its management record.

Journalists working for non-state media are denied access to some important news events or information. They face similar problems when trying to report on some private corporations, due to a poorly developed corporate communications/investor relations culture. For instance, only a few firms listed firms on the Zimbabwe Stock Exchange (ZSE) maintain useful, regularly updated websites.

What do you hope to accomplish in 2014?

Our target for 2014 is to consolidate our position as Zimbabwe’s first domestic financial news service. We hope to improve our content, both in quality, through continued staff training, and quantity, by expanding our stringer network. We also hope to generate more exclusive content to ensure more pick-ups by our media clients as we grow our brand in the market.

As a former Reuters correspondent and now editor of The Source, what advice would you give to budding journalists?

My advice to budding journalists is to stay hungry, stay curious and aspire to the highest standards of journalism by consuming quality content and, better still, continuous training, such as that offered by Thomson Reuters Foundation. If they can, they should find a mentor – a seasoned journalist who can help them through their formative years in the trade. One of the key lessons I took from Reuters is the importance of preparation. Preparation – equipping oneself with basic tools for an assignment, or background research to understand a beat, an interview subject or an issue – is perhaps two-thirds of an assignment done. Above all, they should stay true to ethical conduct in their work.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Project:
Zimbabwe: Establishing the Country’s First Independent Financial News Service
Believing Zimbabwe can boost its own economic development by increasing awareness and improving citizens’ general knowledge of financial matters, we have sought, together with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, to establish the country’s first source of accurate, sustainable, and independent financial and economic news, owned and operated by Zimbabweans.

Press Release

For Immediate Release

28 January 2014


Maastricht, the Netherlands - The European Journalism Centre (EJC) has released the Verification Handbook, the first ever guide for using user-generated content (UGC) during humanitarian emergencies.


Whether it is debunking images of ‘street sharks’ during Hurricane Sandy, or determining the veracity of videos that depict human rights abuses, reporting the right information is critical in shaping responses from the public and relief workers as a crisis unfolds.

By providing the exact methods needed to validate information, photos and videos shared by the crowd, the Verification Handbook forms an essential component of any organisation’s disaster preparedness plan.

The Verification Handbook draws on the experiences of practitioners from some of the world’s premier news and aid organisations, including BBC, Storyful, The Guardian, ABC, Buzzfeed UK, NHK, Poynter Institute, Digital First Media, the Tow Center, GigaOM, the Qatar Foundation’s Computing Research Institute (QCRI), the Internews Center for Innovation & Learning, OpenStreetMap, Amnesty International, Circa, Meedan, the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC), WITNESS, the Dart Centre Europe, and Shabab Souria.

An online version of Verification Handbook is available for free at http://verificationhandbook.com, and a PDF, Kindle and Print version will be released on 7 February. An Arabic version of the Handbook will also be released soon thereafter.

The initiative is financed by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, as well as by the African Media Initiative (AMI), and supported by the Office of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR), the United Nations Development Programme (UNDP), the Ethical Journalism Network (EJN), Humanity Road and many other organisations.

Website: http://verificationhandbook.com
Twitter hashtag: #emjo

For more information, please contact:
Rina Tsubaki (Project Manager), European Journalism Centre
Email: info@verificationhandbook.com
Tel: +31 43 325 40 30
Website: www.emergencyjournalism.net

Project:
Verification Handbook
The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) has launched a new website, www.journalismgrants.org, for its Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme. The new website went live on Tuesday, 22 January, 2014, marking the first anniversary of the grant programme.

The revamped website gives a comprehensive overview of the 28 projects funded under the grant programme. The public can access a showcase of all outstanding projects awarded in 2013 a combined total of 550.000 Euros in funding aimed to innovate global development narratives and bring new forms of journalistic storytelling centered on the Millennium Development Goals.

“In line with the current global efforts directed at increasing transparency regarding development spending, we want to also show to the public what the funded projects are all about. Consequently, the new website provides information regarding each funded project, including the grant recipients’ names, the funded amounts, the deadlines, the aim and objectives of their stories, as well as the results of the projects”, says EJC Director Wilfried Rütten.

In 2014 the EJC will run two more rounds of applications. Don’t miss the next deadline coming up on the 26th of February 2014 (22:00 CET). Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes can pitch their stories via the online application form. For questions, check the FAQ guide, or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

###

Note for editors:

The Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe, and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

This year the nonprofit news site Texty published the Ukrainian translation of the Data Journalism Handbook. This is the fifth translation of the book to date.


Screen_shot_2013-12-03_at_17.50.29.png


Texty combines social, political, economic and cultural reporting on Ukraine, garnering a monthly readership of about 100,000 people. Since 2011, the organisation has published several data-driven projects. One of them is a web application tracking public procurement in the country, shortlisted for the 2012 edition of the Data Journalism Awards. Texty also provides data journalism training.


These two activities - data-driven reporting and data journalism training - drove the organisation to translate the handbook into Ukrainian. Anatoly Bondarenko, editor of Texty, explained: “We decided to produce the translation right after we saw the book in 2012. Such a good collection of case studies should not go overlooked! [...] At our data journalism trainings for reporters and activists, we use the book as recommended reading material. So far, we received many 
positive reactions from our students as to the examples that can be found there from media around the globe.”


The translation was carried out over four months by one translator and one editor, with financial support from the Open Society Foundations.


While data journalism is progressing in Ukraine, it still struggles to find a place in the mainstream media. “We think that the future of data journalism in our country is not in mainstream media but more in the hands of small collectives”, said Bondarenko. “Forbes Ukraine intended to produce data journalism, but the magazine was recently bought by one of the oligarchs close to the presidential family and the policies of the magazine were radically changed. Therefore, right now, the most interesting projects in this field don’t come from big newsrooms, but rather from independent online media platforms and small NGOs. Noteworthy projects include zloch.in.ua, a map of crime in Kiev, and rada.oporaua.org, a website that tracks parliamentary activity in Ukraine, maintained by the civil network Opora.”

 

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

Project:
Data Journalism Handbook
The Data Journalism Handbook is a collection of tips, techniques, case studies, and tutorials from leading data journalism experts. Translated into Russian, with six more translations underway, the 'bible of data journalism' has become an essential component of the journalistic toolkit and a reference for many news rooms across the world.

The Georgian Institute of Public Affairs (GIPA), together with the European Journalism Centre (EJC), released today the first two chapters of the Georgian translation of the Data Journalism Handbook (the remaining chapters will be serialised over the coming months). This is the fourth published translation of the Handbook to date and several more are coming soon.


DDJ_book_cover_Georgian.jpg


Data Journalism Handbook cover in Georgian


The event prompted us to take a closer look at the data journalism scene in Georgia, and how the translation of the handbook came to be. To find out more about these, we talked to Josh LaPorte, EJC Country Manager for Georgia, and Tina Tsomaia, Assistant Professor at the Caucasus School of Journalism and Media Management at GIPA. The EJC has had a long-standing partnership with GIPA going back many years, in the form of journalism education and curriculum development initiatives, among others.



What is the state of data journalism in Georgia?

TinaTsomaia_pic.jpgTina Tsomaia: The state of data journalism in the country is poor. Only one non-profit organization is regularly engaged in it and it does so through donor funding (JumpStart. More on that later.) Some stories using data are popular among interested readers and spread quickly through social media like Facebook, so there is some demand. But in general media outlets find data journalism time-intensive and expensive to do, and journalists are generally not trained in this field. They don’t know how to do this kind of work or how to regularly produce stories out of data. But there is also no real pressure for additional data journalism stories coming from media outlets or from the market, since much of Georgian journalism is focused on daily political news and sensationalist stories.




What drove GIPA to focus on data journalism?


Josh LaPorte: GIPA is tapped into global media trends and works with some of the biggest global players in media education, such as IREX, Columbia University, EJC, or Thomson Reuters. It became quite apparent that data journalism capacity building was just not happening in Georgia. GIPA sensed this represented a gap in the media education market and realised it was an opportunity to expand its curriculum, for the sake of its students, and to promote the topic, on a wider scale, for the Georgian media community in general.


JLaporte_pic.jpg


How accessible is data in Georgia?


LaPorte: The government has recently put huge amounts of data online and this has created some very positive dynamics, which is why our initiative has good timing in terms of local data resources and databases. So access is very high. But this data is not effectively being delivered to the public in any kind of regular reader/viewer-friendly way. For example, Transparency International Georgia is very good in collecting and collating this data. But it is not in the business of telling stories with data. Rather, it focuses on how to use and source data.
There are of course a few journalists who are using the data - and using it correctly in some investigations - but not on a regular basis.


Who are the main actors in the field of data journalism in the country?


LaPorte: As mentioned above, GIPA is the main actor. No media outlet would really fit into this category. Only the non-profit organisation JumpStart has a dedicated programme. Its project, Visualizing the News in Georgia, funds the organisation Feradi which produces data-driven stories.


Can you tell us about the most impressive Georgian data journalism project you’ve encountered so far?


Tsomaia: JumpStart has stories on their website but they are only distributed online so they have limited impact. In fact only two stories were picked by mainstream media: one was about the environment and the other was about crime.


How did you decide to translate the handbook into Georgian?


LaPorte: We jointly decided to do an official translation of the Handbook as a regular resource for GIPA students and Georgian journalists. The real impetus came from a pilot data journalism workshop we implemented last summer together with Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, called New World of Journalism in the Digital Age. Enthusiasm and participation were extremely high among the local media and we realised, moving forward, that resources like the Handbook would be an important component in teaching data journalism courses and in introducing global best practice examples.


Tsomaia: When you see a truly good resource, you think it was created especially for you! In a sense, this is how we feel about the Data Journalism Handbook. We will use the Handbook as a guide while developing the Media Engineering Master, the first of its kind in the region, bringing together students of journalism and students of computer science. It will also serve us to train journalists and students in data journalism and data visualisation.


Were there any local chapters added to the book?


LaPorte: Not yet, but we would like to do that at some point in 2014, adding step-by-step description of some local cases that had impact.



Image 2: Tina Tsomaia, Assistant Professor at the Caucasus School of Journalism and Media Management at GIPA Image 3: Josh LaPorte, EJC Country Manager for Georgia

Disclaimer: DataDrivenJournalism.net is an European Journalism Centre initiative.


 

Project:
Data Journalism Handbook
The Data Journalism Handbook is a collection of tips, techniques, case studies, and tutorials from leading data journalism experts. Translated into Russian, with six more translations underway, the 'bible of data journalism' has become an essential component of the journalistic toolkit and a reference for many news rooms across the world.

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

Project:
Georgia: Finances and Transparency - New Approaches for Georgian Journalism
Addressing a Georgian-specific problem, namely the absence of investigative coverage of economic corruption issues, the project's objective is to promote excellence in journalism by instituting a competition on the national level. Our work in Georgia also involves journalistic capacity building through training, developed in cooperation with local institutions and international organisations.

Our South Africa partner, Vuselela Media recently announced the winners of their community journalism awards.

Sandisiwe Sokrowa, has won the 2013 Vuselela Community Journalism Awards, at a ceremony held in Johannesburg on Wednesday and announced as part of the B Media Y’s TV show during the weekend.

The Community Journalism Awards recognises the work of community journalists in the categories of: best community cell phone journalism, best public service announcement, best school cell phone journalism and best community journalism documentary.

(from Left) 2nd Place winner Felcia Lenonyane, 3rd Place winner Sihle Mbathani and Community Journalism Documentary Award winner Sandisiwe Sokrowa
(from Left) 2nd Place winner Felcia Lenonyane, 3rd Place winner Sihle Mbathani and Community Journalism Documentary Award winner Sandisiwe Sokrowa

The four winners and the respective runners-up were announced as part of the final television show of B Media Y’sfor 2013 hosted by Maraza, the anchor of the show with guests including Boston City Campus media liaison, Nontokozo Zulu and Fikile Ntanzi, project partner from loveLife.

Chorora High School in Rustenburg’s Oratile Moleleki won the School Squad competition with her piece entitled “Our School Choir”. The Best Public Service Announcement Award went to the loveLife groundBreaker from Langa Township for “Dear Diary: Safe Sex PSA” while Emathulini loveLife’s submission of “Teenage Pregnancy”, a cell phone clip, won them the Community Cell phone journalism award.

The big award the Community Journalist of the year went to KwaNobuhle, Eastern Cape community journalist Sandisiwe Sokrowa, for her submission of “13”, the story of a thirteen-year-old mandrax addict.

Of the piece Sandisiwe recollects “the boy (in the interview), doesn’t stay far from my house, I wanted to make a difference in his life by giving him a platform to make the subject important and make his story important”.

Sandisiwe took home a sponsored 3-year R90 000 Boston Media House bursary, R5000 in cash prizes and a fully paid internship at Vuselela.

“Established in 2012, the awards are in their infancy, yet the diversity of entries this year is evidence to the growing awareness of the organisation and the awards,” said Brandon Oelofse, a director at Vuselela. The awards are made possible through collaboration with the European Journalism Center (EJC) and the Open Society Foundation of South Africa (OSF-SA) who support the B Media Ys project.

The winners were narrowed down from more than 3000 entries. A sixteen-judge panel of industry experts, journalists, project partners and programme affiliates selected the runner-up and winning entries.

The Handover of grand prize awards by Kerry Damons (Boston City Campus), Nontokozo Zulu (Boston City Campus) with Fikile Ntanzi (loveLife)
The Handover of grand prize awards by Kerry Damons (Boston City Campus), Nontokozo Zulu (Boston City Campus) with Fikile Ntanzi (loveLife)


Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Project:
South Africa: Youth Digital Media Literacy Programme
Striving to empower young South-Africans through the use of their most immediately available medium - their mobile phones - ‘B Media Ys’ provides media education to youths from the country’s more marginalised communities, and gives them the opportunity to showcase their media productions on mobile media networks, national and community TV.

The winners of the second annual student journalism competitions were announced in La Paz earlier this month by EJC local partner Fundacion para el Periodismo. The two competitions, “Reporter for A Day” and “The Interview of My Dreams” are part of the global competitions originally created by the World Association of Newspapers Youth Engagement and News Literacy programme. Over 180 proposals were received from students across Bolivia.
And the winners are:

The Interview of My Dreams

Two testimonies about teenage abortion: From the sky or from the earth?

By Carolina Vargas, Micaela Torres y Mishel Ibáñez;

Secondary School: Instituto Bancario, Teacher: Richard Chávez

Reporter for a Day

Testimonies of children who are victims of domestic violence: To Paste and to insult a woman : a custom that could not be rooted out in rural areas

Student Team—North Education Unit Yesera Tarija

The final stories written and submitted by the Bolivian student teams addressed important issues such as abortion and domestic violence. Sponsored through the EJC’s five year Press Freedom 2.0 project in Bolivia funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs, the project was implemented by Fundacion para el Periodismo as well as the Bolivian National Press Association. The competitions are held with the goal of bringing youth right into the daily life of a journalist as well as a way to improve their writing and interviewing skills.

The first contest ” The Interview of My Dreams ” , was implemented for the second consecutive year and consisted of students coached by their language and literature teachers, who are offered the chance to interview a Bolivian public figure of their choice. The competition is aimed at students aged 11-14 years. The second ” Reporter for a Day” , targets students aged 15-18 years old and includes visits to local media where journalists assist students with preparing their own reportages.

EJC Bolivian partner Fundacion para el Periodismo announces winners of 2013 national student journalism competitions “Reporter for a Day” and “Interview of My Dreams”

The winning stories were published widely in major Bolivian media and can be read here:

¿Desde el cielo o desde la tierra?Niños Reflejan Temas de Aborto y Violencia en Reportajes Marcos: el genio del cineLos lustrabotas somos personas de combate
Niños del Alcides Arguedas hicieron la entrevista que siempre soñaron
Violencia contra la mujer y aborto en adolescentes temas ganadores de concurso de la FPP
Reconocen a ganadores de concursos de periodismo
Estudiantes de colegio fueron periodistas por un día

Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Press Release
For Immediate Release
Maastricht, the Netherlands
13 November 2013

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce the winners of the second round of its Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme.

Twelve outstanding projects will be awarded a combined total of 225.541,00 Euros in funding to innovate global development narratives and bring to the public new forms of journalistic storytelling centered on the Millennium Development Goals. An advisory council of senior journalists oversaw the final decisions of the awards. The second round of the grant programme ran from 3 April until 5 September 2013 and received 242 applications.

The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets targeting audiences in France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, and the United Kingdom.

Funded topics will focus on issues such as: neglected tropical diseases, microcredits in the Democratic Republic of Congo, investigation of large scale land-grabbing by multinationals in rural West Africa, child mortality in India, mobile money’s influence on development, sports’ and gender equality’s roles in development, biodiversity, myths and misunderstandings about the Millennium Development Goals, and the reconstruction of Haiti.

The winning teams will employ multi-platform approaches, engage in cross-country media collaboration and make use of interactive applications, as well as investigative, data-driven and photo journalism. The projects will be released in the form of cross-platform storytelling that includes: TV and web documentaries, animated and interactive maps, multimedia and graphic features, mobile applications, and animated videos. Various social media tools will also be used extensively.

“With the very important on-going public dialogue around the Millennium Development Goals unfolding ahead of the 2015 target, the winning projects are very well-timed to put global development topics on the agenda of a wide public debate”, says EJC Director Wilfried Rütten.

The EJC will again run two more rounds of applications in 2014. Don’t miss the next deadline coming up next year on the 26th of February 2014 (22:00 CET). Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes can pitch their stories via the online application form. For questions, check the FAQ guide or send an email to info@journalismgrants.org.

The winners for this round are:

Project name: Beyond WHO’s List of Neglected Tropical Diseases (NTD)
Description: A radio series presents five neglected diseases/conditions beyond WHO’s NTD list: Antibiotic Resistances, Mental Illness, Nodding Syndrome, Traffic accidents, and Typhoid Fever.
Project locations: Uganda, Tanzania, Kenya, Madagascar, Geneva/Switzerland
Media outlet: Deutschlandfunk - “Forschung aktuell” (Germany)

Journalist(s): Franziska Badenschier

Project name: The State of Development: Myths & misunderstandings about the Millennium Development Goals
Description: A fact-checking investigation of the MDG results with use of open data.
Project locations: Videos: China, India, Ghana, Brazil, DRC, Sierra Leone
Media outlet(s): De Volkskrant, OneWorld (The Netherlands) Journalist(s): Lonneke van Genugten

Project name: Building peace, one credit at a time
Description: A feature-length documentary and web-documentary investigation into the impact of microcredits in the Democratic Republic of Congo.
Project locations: Democratic Republic of Congo
Media outlet(s): TV5Monde, Mediapart, L’Echo (France)
Journalist(s): Hervé Verloes, Pacom Bagula, Christian Katsuva; Bryan Carter, Nicolas Kayser-Bril

Project name: The dark side of Italian tomatoes
Description: A cross-platform web-doc on Italian tomatoes disrupting local markets in Africa.
Project locations: Italy, Ghana
Media outlet(s): Le Monde diplomatique (France), Radio France Internationale (France), Internazionale (Italy), Al Jazeera English
Journalist(s): Stefano Liberti

Project name: Dirty Profits Exposed
Description: Investigation of large scale land-grabbing by multinationals in rural West Africa.
Project locations: Freetown, Malen Chiefdom, Bo, all Sierra Leone, and Monrovia, Bassa County, Margibi County, all Liberia
Media outlet(s): Zeit Online (Germany)
Journalist(s): Victoria Schneider, Ilham Rawoot, Jonathan Wood

Project name: Fighting child mortality in India - and winning
Description: Could the answer to infant mortality be in a little village in rural India?
Project locations: Gadchiroli, Maharashtra State, India
Media outlet(s): El País (Spain)
Journalist(s): Jose Miguel Calatayud

Project name: Can the money of the future make poverty an issue of the past?
Description: The overall aim of the project is to look at how mobile money is changing the ways individuals spend, save, trade and exchange. This project aims to make this topic accessible beyond the boundaries of the academic, business and development communities.
Project locations: Haiti, Burkina Faso, Somaliland, Nepal, Italy
Media outlet(s): The Guardian (UK), Il Fatto quotidiano (Italy)
Journalist(s): Marco Bello, Gianluca Iazzolino

Project name: Fuelling the war
Description: A multimedia data journalism analysis into why the war in Congo is more profitable than the peace.
Project locations: Democratic Republic of Congo
Media outlet(s): El Mundo (Spain)
Journalist(s): Alberto Rojas, Raquel Villaécija

Project name: Marathon to gender equality
Description: The project aims to explain how women in Kenya’s Iten, home of many of the best long distance runners in the world, are changing the socioeconomic landscape in the area through athletics. A comparison to the situation in Ethiopia will be undertaken.
Project locations: Nairobi and Iten (Kenya) and Addis Abeba (Ethiopia)
Media outlet(s): El Periódico (Spain)
Journalist(s): Javier Triana

Project name: Feeding the planet, cultivating diversity
Description: A digital story on global farmers and scientists working for biodiversity.
Project locations: Ethiopia (Tigray), Senegal (Thies), and Iran (Garmsar, Kermanshah)
Media outlet(s): Rai Radio3 (Italy), Wired (Italy), Le Figaro (France)
Journalist(s): Elisabetta Tola

Project name: Enough! – Women fighting violence and inequality together in new ways.
Description: From the Red Brigades to One Billion Rising to Holla Back! and the Everyday Sexism Project, such groups are popping up everywhere – in rural Kenya, urban Egypt and across Afghanistan, Yemen, Pakistan, South Africa and elsewhere, as women band together to fight inequality, sexual harassment and violence using vigilantism, digital technology and even founding women’s only villages. How do they work and how effective are they at improving the lives of women? How are they impacting local communities, families, children, and other women around the world? How are they impacting policy?
Project locations: Kenya, Afghanistan, Pakistan, India, South Africa, Egypt, Mexico and Yemen.
Media outlet(s): Die Welt (Germany)
Journalist(s): Jennifer Collins

Project name: Rebuilding Haiti
Description: The project will design a web-based interactive story and game about Haiti’s rebuilding process where the user can take on different roles.
Project locations: Haiti, France
Media outlet(s): Rue89.com (France)
Journalist(s): Florent Maurin, Jean Abbiateci

The Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants
Mailing list: http://journalismgrants.org/contact-us/

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Press Release

For Immediate Release

Maastricht, the Netherlands

4 November 2013

Today the European Journalism Centre (EJC) announced that it will be launching its new Verification Handbook in January 2014. The Verification Handbook is a groundbreaking new resource for journalists and aid responders, which provides step-by-step guidelines for using user-generated content (UGC) during emergencies.

In a crisis situation, social networks are overloaded with situational updates, calls for relief, reports of new developments, and rescue information. Reporting the right information is often critical in shaping responses from the public and relief workers; it can literally be a matter of life or death. 

The Verification Handbook draws on the experiences of practitioners from some of the world’s top news organisations, including the BBC, Storyful, ABC, and Digital First Media, to equip journalists with the skills to accurately serve the public with these necessary updates.  

The handbook will be freely available online to anyone interested in brushing up on their verification skills beginning Tuesday the 28th of January 2014. A print version will also be available to order soon thereafter. 

This EJC initiative is financed by the Dutch Ministry of Education, Culture and Science, as well as by the African Media Initiative (AMI). The project is endorsed by numerous international organisations including UNHCR, UNAOC, and UNDP. 

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Website: http://verificationhandbook.com

Twitter hashtag: #emjo

For more information, please contact:

Madolyn Smith (Press), European Journalism Centre

Email: info@emergencyjournalism.net

or

Rina Tsubaki (Project Manager), European Journalism Centre

Email: tsubaki@ejc.net

Tel: +31 43 325 40 30

Website: www.emergencyjournalism.net

Project:
Emergency Journalism
The objective of this initiative is to brings together news and resources necessary for media professionals reporting in and about volatile situations. Featuring up-to-date digital tools varying from content curation tools to multi-layered live maps, the initiative supports media coverage of emergencies such as natural disasters and political conflicts.

Press Release

For Immediate Release

London/Harare/Maastricht

29 October 2013

The Source, a new website launched today in Harare, will provide citizens, media organisations, and potential investors in Zimbabwe with greater access to trusted, real-time financial and business news and analysis.

The Source is run entirely by a team of Zimbabwean journalists and aims to illustrate coherently the country’s fast-changing economic environment. The site will serve as a trusted source of information for investors both in and outside of Zimbabwe. With an initial target of 100 original stories per month, The Source will cover a wide range of asset classes, including equities, bonds and currencies.  News coverage will be supported by editorials and analytical pieces, seven days a week.

“The Source is a groundbreaking initiative which takes the pulse of the nation’s economy. Through a network of financial journalists across Zimbabwe, we are now able to provide what has been lacking so far: high quality coverage of the mining, agricultural and tourism industries,” said Nelson Banya, Editor of The Source.

Supported by the European Journalism Centre and the Thomson Reuters Foundation, the website’s mission is to fill the information void widely felt across the growing business community in Zimbabwe.

“Investors need access to reliable financial news to make informed decisions. Until now, such crucial information has been lacking. By fulfilling the needs of the business community, The Source will play a role in expanding the country’s economy, which is a crucial component of Zimbabwe’s overall sustainable development path,” said Wilfried Rütten, Director of the European Journalism Centre.

Guided by the Reuters principles of editorial integrity, all journalists working for The Source will abide to a strong code of conduct based on impartiality, freedom from bias, independence and accuracy.

“The founding principles and structure of The Source safeguard its impartiality and independence,” said Jo Weir, Director of the Thomson Reuters Foundation’s media and journalism training programme. “As part of our commitment to The Source, we will also provide regular skills training and mentoring for all staff journalists and stringers.”

The Source is live and accessible at http://source.co.zw.

For more information please contact:

EJC Project Manager Marjan Tillmans

or

EJC Project Manager Josh LaPorte

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About the Thomson Reuters Foundation

The Thomson Reuters Foundation leverages the skills, values and expertise of Thomson Reuters to run programmes that trigger change and empower people across the world: free legal assistance, media development, and in-depth coverage of the world’s under-reported stories. The Foundation stands for human rights, women’s empowerment, anti-corruption and for the rule of law. Visit our website at http://www.trust.org.

About the European Journalism Centre

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a Netherlands-based independent, international, non-profit institute dedicated to promoting the highest standards in journalism, primarily through the further training of journalists and media professionals. Since 1992, the Centre operates as a facilitator and partner in a wide variety of training projects at the global level, building on its extensive international network. Visit our website at http://www.ejc.net.

 

Project:
Zimbabwe: Establishing the Country’s First Independent Financial News Service
Believing Zimbabwe can boost its own economic development by increasing awareness and improving citizens’ general knowledge of financial matters, we have sought, together with the Thomson Reuters Foundation, to establish the country’s first source of accurate, sustainable, and independent financial and economic news, owned and operated by Zimbabweans.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Press Release
For Immediate Release
European Journalism Centre
24 October 2013


To put the spotlight on entrepreneurs behind new technologies, such as an innovative thermostat that cuts your energy bill by hundreds of euros or a video game that helps you recover faster from injuries, the European Institute of Innovation and Technology (EIT) will present its 2013 EIT Awards on Tuesday, 12 November in Budapest.

20 business and science journalists from the EU Member States are invited to Hungary to report on the latest developments in European innovation and entrepreneurship. They will meet all the innovators and entrepreneurs that are nominated for the 2013 EIT Awards.

Journalists who would like to register for this event, please visit this website or send an email to Lisa Bushart. All other attendees, please register here.

Journalists are guaranteed personal interviews with nominees and winners. Representatives of leading authorities on innovation and entrepreneurship, including chairman of the EIT Governing Board Alexander von Gabain and World Innovation Institute founder Naveen Jain, will also be available to the press.

The awards ceremony will be held at the end of a one-day conference that will celebrate innovation and entrepreneurship. The event will showcase the innovative ventures and young entrepreneurial talent emerging from the EIT’s three Knowledge & Innovation Communities (KICs) Climate-KIC, EIT ICT Labs and KIC InnoEnergy. 

The EIT aims to enhance Europe’s ability to innovate. This translates into adapting quickly to the fast pace of development, providing solutions to rapidly emerging societal problems, and developing products that meet the demands and desires of consumers. The EIT is a body of the European Union and became operational in 2010.

For further information, please visit http://eit.europa.eu.

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Recently the EJC, together with our local partner AfricaonAir (AoA), held a training course in Mombasa, Kenya on Reporting Development that focused on government tourism policies and their place in overall national development policy. Trainers included AfricaonAir director Joseph Warungu and EJC trainer Hamadou Tidiane Sy of Senegal. Participants came primarily from Kenyan coastal based media around Mombasa, where tourism plays a significant role in that region’s development. Participants represented various media outlets including, the Nation Media Group, Radio Sheki, Radio Salaam, The Star, PiliPili FM, Radio Rahma, and The Coast This Week, among others.

Following completion of the course, all participants received joint EJC—AoA certificates.  

In addition, the EJC also held a joint roundtable with its MFS Press Freedom 2.0 Consortium partner, Mensen met een Missie (MM) that featured lively discussions between the EJC journalist participants and the communication officers of MM’s Kenyan partner humanitarian NGOs, and the misconceptions that the two groups often have of one another. The roundtable was moderated by EJC trainer Hamadou Tidiane Sy. 

Below are some photos that illustrate highlights of the Mombasa events:

EJC Kenyan project country team Josh LaPorte and Marjan Tillmans together with EJC journalism trainer Hamadou Tidiane Sy present well-earned certificates to participants.
EJC Kenyan project country team Josh LaPorte and Marjan Tillmans together with EJC journalism trainer Hamadou Tidiane Sy present well-earned certificates to participants.
The first group of journalists trained in the Mombasa region as part of EJC and AfricaonAir’s five year Netherlands Foreign Ministry funded project.
The first group of journalists trained in the Mombasa region as part of EJC and AfricaonAir’s five year Netherlands Foreign Ministry funded project.
The Journalist—Civil Society Organisations roundtable was moderated by EJC trainer Hamadou Tidiane Sy (seated center) and opening remarks made by AfricaonAir director Joseph Warungu (seated left) and Michael Ochieng (seated right) representing the Kenya Peace Network of civil society organisations.
The Journalist—Civil Society Organisations roundtable was moderated by EJC trainer Hamadou Tidiane Sy (seated center) and opening remarks made by AfricaonAir director Joseph Warungu (seated left) and Michael Ochieng (seated right) representing the Kenya Peace Network of civil society organisations.
Kenyan journalists voice their opinions on relations between civil society organizations and the media.
Kenyan journalists voice their opinions on relations between civil society organizations and the media.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Project:
Kenya: Raising Development Awareness Through the Media
The lack of in-depth, well-researched, and effective reporting on development issues in Kenya is weakening the media’s capacity to have an impact on the country’s political processes. EJC’s Kenya programme seeks to raise awareness to this problem, offering workshops dedicated to developing practical solutions by promoting relevant, powerful, and effective journalistic storytelling.

Our media environment is increasingly saturated with data – from large collections of leaked documents published by WikiLeaks, to public databases about lobbying or government spending, to ‘big data’ from social networks such as Twitter and Facebook. As a result, many media organisations are seeking data-savvy journalists to help them to process this information: to understand what is in it, to identify what is important and to provide insights to readers in a compelling way.

To help journalists to acquire the abilities that are increasingly required for journalism jobs in the 21st century newsroom, DataDrivenJournalism.net set out to create the online course Doing Journalism with Data. The course, which will start early next year, is an introduction to the essential concepts, techniques and skills necessary to effectively work with data and produce compelling data stories, and is open to anyone in the world with an Internet connection who wants to tell stories with data.

The course is being developed with the input and guidance of an amazing group of instructors and advisors comprising of: Justin Arenstein (African Media Initiative), Paul Bradshaw (Birmingham City University), Alberto Cairo (University of Miami), Steve Doig (Walter Cronkite J-School), Josh Hatch (The Chronicle of Higher Education), Nicolas Kayser-Bril (Journalism++), Angélica Peralta Ramos (La Nacion), Aron Pilhofer (New York Times), Simon Rogers (Twitter), Guido Romeo (Wired Italy) and Sascha Venohr (Zeit Online). 

To follow the course you can register at datadrivenjournalism.net/course. The course materials will be made available under a Creative Commons license, so if you’d like to talk to us about translating them or including them into your own training modules please get in touch

 

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

PRESS RELEASE
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
EUROPEAN JOURNALISM CENTRE
15 OCTOBER 2013

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce that registration is now open for its free online data journalism course Doing Journalism with Data: First Steps, Skills and Tools.

This five-module introductory course gives participants the essential concepts, techniques and skills to effectively work with data and produce compelling stories under tight deadlines. It is open to anyone in the world with an Internet connection who wants to tell stories with data.

This EJC initiative is supported by Google, the Dutch Ministry of Education and the African Media Initiative, and features a stellar line-up of instructors and advisors from the Walter Cronkite School of Journalism, the New York Times, ProPublica, Wired, Twitter, La Nacion Argentina, the Chronicle of Higher Education, Zeit Online, and others. 

Josh Hatch, Senior Editor at The Chronicle of Higher Education and member of the Advisory Board for this course, says: “Thanks to the European Journalism Centre’s work to foster data journalism’s move into the mainstream, reporters and editors can gain insights from the best in the business. Whether you want to get over your fear of Excel, learn the language of your data geeks, or discover how to tell stories with data visualisations, this course will help journalists and newsrooms learn how to take advantage of these invaluable skills. This is a very good thing.”

The course is planned to start early 2014 and the instruction language will be English. More details about the course and how to register are available at: 

www.datadrivenjournalism.net/course.

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Contact: 

Liliana Bounegru

Project Manager (Data Journalism)

European Journalism Centre

Email: bounegru@ejc.net

Note to Editors

  • The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.
  •  
  • The EJC’s Data Driven Journalism programme is one of the leading initiatives for training, resources and networking in the area of data journalism. Founded in 2010, the programme is dedicated to accelerating the diffusion and improving the quality of data journalism around the world, whether the focus is on investigations, news applications, putting news into context, or simply using data to inform and assist journalistic work. The initiative also includes the website DataDrivenJournalism.net, the School of Data Journalism, as well as the acclaimed Data Journalism Handbook.
Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

The European Journalism Centre
FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE
September 9, 2013


The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce that it has received 242 applications in the second round of the Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme.

“Seeing the immense and authentic interest from media houses and freelance journalists to play a greater role when it comes to social change, the EJC, with renewed support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, will continue the grant programme next year. Everyone who missed our deadlines: stay tuned, as we are preparing two new rounds of applications in 2014. Details on new deadlines will follow soon”, says EJC Director Wilfried Ruetten. For updates regarding the new deadlines and more, please register for the Journalism Grants mailing list

“As with the first round, we aim to fund another 16 projects that will share a budget amounting to more than €300.000. What is interesting to note is that, in both rounds, the majority of the submissions came from Italy”, Ruetten mentions.

Over the next three weeks, the EJC will evaluate the entries and inform all applicants of the status of their application(s). Due to the large number of submissions, EJC will not be able to give individual feedback to unsuccessful candidates. Shortlisted applicants will then have one month’s time to submit a complete proposal and provide supporting documents. The awarded grants will be announced in mid-November.

The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme (IDR) was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. A selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility will be awarded funding aimed to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org
Website: http://journalismgrants.org
Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants
Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

The Data Journalism Handbook has reached a new milestone today with the publication of its third translation, into French, entitled Guide du datajournalisme.

Cover of the French version of the Data Journalism Handbook.
Cover of the French version of the Data Journalism Handbook.

The handbook is a free, collaborative book that aims to help journalists use data to improve journalism. It provides inspiring examples from news organisations across the world and a collection of tips and techniques from leading journalists, professors, software developers and data analysts. The book is the product of a collaboration between the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation and was published in its original English version about a year ago.

Translated by the French publisher Eyrolles and edited by Nicolas Kayser-Bril, CEO and co-founder of Journalism++, and Editorial Board member of this website, the French edition is augmented with recent examples from French and Belgian publications such as Le Monde, Rue89 and France Soir.

Jean Abbiateci, a French freelance journalist and one of the winners of this year’s edition of the Data Journalism Awards, is one of the new authors added to the list of over 70 contributors to the book. In the case study entitled “Une pige de ‘scraping olimpique’”, Abbiateci recounts his work on obtaining and cleaning data for an application for the national public radio, France Info, dedicated to the London 2012 summer Olympics.

Hardcopies of the French edition of the handbook can be purchased from the website of Eyrolles, eyrolles.com, as of tomorrow. The book is freely available online on Journalism++ and the source code can be found on GitHub.

A Russian and a Spanish translation of the handbook have already been published and three other translations, into Chinese, Arabic and Portuguese, are in progress and will be published later this year. 

The French translation of the graphic by Lulu Pinney, showing what is in the book.
The French translation of the graphic by Lulu Pinney, showing what is in the book.
Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

Project:
Data Journalism Handbook
The Data Journalism Handbook is a collection of tips, techniques, case studies, and tutorials from leading data journalism experts. Translated into Russian, with six more translations underway, the 'bible of data journalism' has become an essential component of the journalistic toolkit and a reference for many news rooms across the world.

On 29 August, a free-of-charge media conference on ‘Crowdsourcing in Asian Journalism’ will be held in Manila, the Philippines as part of the annual ANN Coordinators’ Meeting. The event is co-organised by the Konrad Adenauer Foundation in Singapore, the European Journalism Centre (EJC), Asia News Network (ANN) and Konrad Adenauer Asian Center for Journalism at the Ateneo de Manila University (ACFJ).

With a focus on Asian Journalism, a group of experts and practitioners will examine the opportunities and challenges in journalism and crowdsourcing, as well as trends and their implications to professional standards and the future of the Asian news industry. They will also address allied media industries.

The confirmed speakers include: 

  • Maria RESSA, CEO and Executive Editor, Rappler.com, Philippines (Keynote)
  • Mark V. ESCALER, Chair, Department of Communication Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines
  • Torben STEPHAN, Director, Media Programme Asia Konrad-Adenauer-Stiftung (KAS), Singapore
  • Primastuti HANDAYANI, Managing Editor, The Jakarta Post, Indonesia
  • Marisa CHIMPRABHA, Website Editor, The Nation, Thailand
  • Kurt LIN Hanqing, Associate Producer and Anchor, China Daily, China
  • Luz RIMBAN, Co-founder, Trustee and Editor, Vera Files, Philippines
  • Javier Vincente RUFINO, Director for Mobile Inquirer Group, Philippines
  • Rina TSUBAKI, Project Manager, European Journalism Centre (EJC), The Netherlands
  • Philip BEHNKE, Communications & Public Relations Consultant, Singapore
  • Jose M. CRUZ, SJ, PhD Vice President University and Global Relations, Ateneo de Manila University, Philippines

The EJC runs an initiative ‘Emergency Journalism’ which investigates the role of journalists in humanitarian crises. For more information about this event and the initiative, please contact Rina Tsubaki (tsubaki@ejc.net). 

 

From 24 - 28 June 2013, the EJC together with Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and in cooperation with Georgian Institute of Public Affairs (GIPA), implemented the first New World of Journalism in the Digital Age course in Tbilisi, Georgia.

The 5-day programme was aimed at mid-level editors or top-level managers who oversee departments of reporters and writers and other journalists, in a variety of platforms, from magazines/newspapers, broadcast or online. Workshops provided perspectives on the latest trends in digital journalism, including how to make data more visual; how the internet is changing investigative reporting; strategic use of mobile technology; challenges news media companies face amid changing roles in newsroom jobs and better ways to engage readers. Sessions spurred discussion on how to integrate digital journalists with those working in other platforms, building awareness of new digital tools and practices, and how editors can strategise to help their companies compete in the rapidly changing media world.

The sessions were led by Washington Post Digital Editor Anup Kaphle (left), and Irene Jay Liu, Data News Editor for Thomson Reuters Hong Kong Bureau (right).

The sessions were led by Washington Post Digital Editor Anup Kaphle (left), and Irene Jay Liu, Data News Editor for Thomson Reuters Hong Kong Bureau (right).

Irene Jay Liu, Data New Editor for Thomson Reuters Hong Kong Bureau leads the digital journalism workshop.

Irene Jay Liu, Data New Editor for Thomson Reuters Hong Kong Bureau leads the digital journalism workshop.

GIPA Workshop

At the end of the course the 2013 EJC-GIPA-Friedman prize winner was announced. The recipient this year was Nana Naskidashvili of Studio Monitor for her investigative reportage on the lack of access to fresh water in regional Georgia. Pulitzer Prize winner Josh Friedman talked about Nana’s work to the ceremony audience from his home in New York via Skype.

Nana Naskidashvili of Studio Monitor accepts the 2013 GIPA-Friedman Prize.

Nana Naskidashvili of Studio Monitor accepts the 2013 GIPA-Friedman Prize.

Pulitzer Prize winner Josh Friedman talks about Nana's work to the ceremony audience from his home in New York via Skype.

Pulitzer Prize winner Josh Friedman talks about Nana’s work to the ceremony audience from his home in New York via Skype.

The EJC/Columbia Journalism School cooperative program with GIPA ended on Friday evening in Tbilisi Georgia at a ceremony hosted by GIPA Dean Badri Koplatadze. Ten local journalists received a coveted certificate for their successful participation in the course “The New World Of Journalism in the Digital Age’, the first of its kind in the region in partnership with the Columbia Journalism School.


Gipa Ceremony

Everyone received a Certificate of Attendance after completing the course.

Everyone received a Certificate of Attendance after completing the course.

EJC Project Executive Josh LaPorte stops for a photo with EJC-GIPA-Friedman prize winner, Nana Naskidashvili of Studio Monitor.

EJC Project Executive Josh LaPorte stops for a photo with EJC-GIPA-Friedman prize winner, Nana Naskidashvili of Studio Monitor.

Georgian Channel 9 interviewed Dean Badri Koplatadze and GIPA-Friedman Prize winner Nana Naskidashvili during the ceremony. Watch the video below:


Project:
Georgia: Finances and Transparency - New Approaches for Georgian Journalism
Addressing a Georgian-specific problem, namely the absence of investigative coverage of economic corruption issues, the project's objective is to promote excellence in journalism by instituting a competition on the national level. Our work in Georgia also involves journalistic capacity building through training, developed in cooperation with local institutions and international organisations.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

The European Journalism Centre

FOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE 

June 19, 2013

Following the Greek government’s recent decision to abruptly close the state public broadcaster, ERT, the European Journalism Centre (EJC) has sent out an appeal to the Greek prime minister to reconsider the decision on the grounds that these actions will undermine both media pluralism and news diversity. The EJC’s Director, Wilfried Rütten writes:

Dear Prime Minister, 


The Board Members and staff of the European Journalism Centre would like to express their deep concern at the decision to close the public broadcaster, ERT. 

Seeing as public broadcasting is a pillar of modern democracy and plays an essential role in a democratic public sphere, we are highly concerned that the closure of the public broadcaster in your country will undermine both media pluralism and news diversity. The silencing of a leading news outlet, at a time when the Greek people are in particular need of accurate information, is an unprecedented attack on freedom of expression and threatens to seriously weaken Greek democracy. 

Therefore, we are respectfully requesting that you take the measures necessary to ensure that your government puts a stop to any actions that threaten the freedom of expression and information. 

We look forward to hearing from you in the near future. Thank you in advance for taking this issue into consideration.

The European Journalism Centre is an international non-profit foundation, based in the Netherlands. It is dedicated to the highest standards in journalism and supports freedom of expression world wide.

In April of 2013 EJC journalism trainer Oliver Wates and Bolivia Country Manager Josh LaPorte took part in a popular live lunch time talk show, Casi al Medio Dia, hosted by Casimira Lema, on Bolivian national network PAT studios in La Paz.

In the three interview segments below the EJC’s media development and press freedom work in the country as well journalism education in Bolivia were discussed intensively, with a particular focus on the unwavering importance of journalistic ethics in a fast changing digital media world. 

Part 1

 

Part 2

 

Part 3

Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

As you may know, The Data Journalism Handbook is a free collaborative book that shows journalists how to use data to improve the news. When we first published it last year, we put out an open call to see if there were people interested in helping to translate the book into their language. The response was overwhelming. A couple of months later, we had over 400 registrants. Since then we’ve been hard at work to set up a global translation initiative – working with journalists, media organisations and universities to translate and localise the book for audiences around the world.

book_oreilly_good_3d_mockup1.png

Today we are pleased to announce that a group of over 30 Brazilian journalists and students are translating the book into Portuguese. The project is coordinated by Brazil’s leading investigative journalism network, Abraji, with the support of the European Journalism Centre (EJC). “Since its foundation, ten years ago, Abraji has been working hard to expand CAR and data journalism in Brazil. So, it’s almost an obligation and certainly an honour for us to help translate The Data Journalism Handbook to Portuguese. Brazilian journalists will gain a lot,” says José Roberto de Toledo, Abraji vice-president and pioneer of CAR in Brazil.

Abraji and EJC will be working closely with the recently announced Iberoamerican Data Journalism Handbook, which will be building on our Data Journalism Handbook to produce a guide specifically targeted at a Latin American audience.

Three other translations, into Arabic, Chinese and Spanish, are in progress and will be published later this year. The book has already been translated into Russian. If your media organisation is interested in coordinating a translation into your local language, we’d love to hear from you.

 

Project:
Data Journalism Handbook
The Data Journalism Handbook is a collection of tips, techniques, case studies, and tutorials from leading data journalism experts. Translated into Russian, with six more translations underway, the 'bible of data journalism' has become an essential component of the journalistic toolkit and a reference for many news rooms across the world.

A year after the release of the English version of The Data Journalism Handbook, we are very pleased to announce that the second  translation, into Spanish, has now been released.

The Data Journalism Handbook is a free, open-source book that aims to help journalists use data to improve journalism. It provides inspiring examples from news organisations across the world and a collection of tips and techniques from leading journalists, professors, software developers, and data analysts for how to get started with data journalism.

Manual_en_español.png Screenshot from the online Spanish edition of The Data Journalism Handbook

The translation was produced by our data team in the Argentinean news agency La Nación. With the summer holiday season in the middle of the translation process, the work took us around five months. We hired an external translator but the data journalism world was new to him, so we held several meetings to polish expressions and adjust vocabulary to a wider Spanish audience. Gaston Roitberg (senior content editor) and Guadalupe López (social media expert and blogs coordinator) helped with the final editing. We worked with Microsoft Word, Google Docs and Notepad ++. I typed myself the code required, comparing the English version hosted in GitHub with the chapters in Spanish edited in Notepad ++. For the online publishing work in ASCII and Python we received invaluable help from Manuel Aristaran, Knight Mozilla Open News Fellow in our newsroom, to whom we are greatly indebted.

We also translated two illustrations: “The Data Journalism Handbook At A Glance” and the Guardian Datablog workflow - the Datablog’s editor, Simon Rogers, provided us with the original Illustrator file and we worked over it.

book1.2_esp_(3).jpg

The Data Journalism Handbook at a Glance - Screenshot from the online Spanish edition

 

 

DataBlogWorkflow_Esp.png The Guardian Datablog Workflow - Screenshot from the online Spanish edition

We believe the handbook is a great resource for the Spanish-speaking community interested in this emerging field. I myself read the entire book many, many times and every time I read it, I discover something new! The diversity of authors sharing their best stories and practices is a permanent inspiration for our work in Argentina. I often find myself saying during our brainstormings, “I think I read something similar in the handbook, let me check!”

Both the original English version and the Spanish translation are freely available online under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, which means that they can be freely downloaded, shared and built upon. The Spanish version of The Data Journalism Handbook can be found at the Interactives section of the La Nación website and there will be a permanent banner in our main data section linking to it. The English version can be found at datajournalismhandbook.org.

Three other translations, into Arabic, Chinese and Portuguese, are in progress and will be published later this year. The book has already been translated into Russian.

 

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

Project:
Data Journalism Handbook
The Data Journalism Handbook is a collection of tips, techniques, case studies, and tutorials from leading data journalism experts. Translated into Russian, with six more translations underway, the 'bible of data journalism' has become an essential component of the journalistic toolkit and a reference for many news rooms across the world.

The School of Data Journalism, Europe’s biggest data journalism event, brings together around 20 panelists and instructors from Reuters, New York Times, Spiegel, Guardian, Walter Cronkite School of Journalism, Knight-Mozilla OpenNews and others, in a mix of discussions and hands-on sessions focusing on everything from cross-border data-driven investigative journalism, to emergency reporting and using spreadsheets, social media data, data visualisation and mapping for journalism.

In this post a list of links have been shared from this training event. The list was updated as the sessions progressed. 

Video recordings 

Slides, tutorials, articles

Tools and other resources

  • Source, an index of news developer source code, code walkthroughs and project breakdowns from journalist-coders
  • School of Data - online tutorials for working with data
  • The Data Journalism Handbook - reference book about how to use data to improve the news authored by 70 data journalism practitioners and advocated
  • Open Refine (for data cleaning)
  • Gephi (for graph visualisations)
  • Hashtagify (visualisation of Twitter hashtags related to a particular #tag)
  • Investigative Dashboard (methodologies, resources, and links for journalists to track money, shareholders, and company ownership across international borders)
  • Tabula (open-source application that allows users to upload PDFs and extract the data in them in CSV format)
  • Topsy (social media analysis tool mentioned in the panel on covering emergencies)
  • DataSift (platform that allows users to filter insights from social media and news sources, mentioned in panel on covering emergencies)
  • Storyful (service that mines social media to discover content relevant for news organisations and verifies it)
  • GeoFeedia (tool that enables location-based search for social media content) 
  • Spokeo (organises information about people from public sources and make it available for search)
  • The Tor project (free software that helps defend against network surveillance and censorship)
  • Follow the Money: A Digital Guide for Tracking Corruption (a handbook for investigative journalists that shows methods, tips and tricks for for tracking companies across borders)

Projects and organisations

We posted photos from this event here

 

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

About one year ago, the European Journalism Centre and the Open Knowledge Foundation released The Data Journalism Handbook, a free collaborative book that shows journalists how to use data to improve the news. Since then we’ve been hard at work to set up a global translation initiative – working with journalists, media organisations and universities to translate and localise the book for audiences around the world. ​

Data Journalism Handbook

As part of this initiative, we are pleased to announce that the European Journalism Centre and Al Jazeera launched the process of translating The Data Journalism Handbook into Arabic. The Arabic translation, which follows similar efforts in Russian, Portuguese, Chinese and Spanish, started about a month ago, and is expected to be concluded by the end of May. 

The Centre started looking for partners interested in collaborating on this translation project in autumn last year. Mohammed El Haddad, online producer for Al Jazeera English, responded to the call and took upon himself the task of garnering internal support for the project. Since then, El Haddad has been one of the leading forces behind this joint effort. Two Al Jazeera translators work on this project: Nada Ahmed, a translation intern, and Ahmed M. Elgoni, senior translator and the project’s coordinator. Explaining Al Jazeera’s motive for joining the project, Elgoni noted that “For Al Jazeera, translating The Data Journalism Handbook into Arabic will introduce new ideas and data literacy to better journalism across the world”.

One of the greatest challenges for the two translators so far has been to compile a glossary of the technical terms used in the original English version that do not exist in Arabic yet, and come up with suited translations. The glossary contains terms such as ‘hackathons’, ‘Hacks/Hackers’, ‘data mining’, ‘scraping’ and so on. 

The original English version of the book and the existing finalised translations into Russian and Spanish are freely available online under a Creative Commons Attribution-ShareAlike license, which means that they can be freely downloaded, shared and built upon. The Spanish version of The Data Journalism Handbook can be found on the Interactives section of the La Nación Argentina website. The Russian translation can be found at the Library section of RIA Novosti’s Corporate Training Centre. The English version can be found at datajournalismhandbook.org.

Project:
Data Driven Journalism Initiative
Believing journalism also involves innovation, the EJC strives to promote Data Driven Journalism and focalise media and audience attention on this developing trend. With this in mind, we’ve created the first dedicated data journalism website, established a community of practitioners, organised workshops, and participated in the publication of the “Data Journalism Handbook".

Project:
Data Journalism Handbook
The Data Journalism Handbook is a collection of tips, techniques, case studies, and tutorials from leading data journalism experts. Translated into Russian, with six more translations underway, the 'bible of data journalism' has become an essential component of the journalistic toolkit and a reference for many news rooms across the world.

The European Journalism CentreFOR IMMEDIATE RELEASE June 3, 2013

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is thrilled to announce the first winners of the Innovation in Development Reporting (IDR) Grant Programme.

Sixteen remarkable projects will be awarded a combined total of more than 300.000 Euros in funding to innovate global development narratives and bring to the public new journalistic storytelling around the Millennium Development Goals. An advisory council of senior journalists oversaw the final decisions of the awards. The projects that have been identified to be eligible for funding will be greenlighted upon signature of a legal contract.

The awarded projects have received endorsement from significant media outlets located in France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom.

Funded topics will focus on issues such as: land grabbing in Africa, health recovery of Rwanda, refugee situations in Ethiopia, European cash flows in Kenya, the digital divide, the future of the world food markets, mapping of Official Development Funds, visualising development data, etc. The winning organisations will employ multi-platform approaches, engage in cross-country media collaboration and make use of interactive applications, as well as investigative, data-driven and photo journalism.

“We are very much looking forward to the results of the projects and have the conviction that they will open up to the European citizens the real face of development”, says EJC Director Wilfried Rütten.

The first round of the grant programme ran from 18 January until 25 March 2013. Over 500 applications were received in only two months’ time.

Journalists and media organisations interested in breaking away from development journalism stereotypes are encouraged to pitch us their creative ideas in the second round of applications. The deadline to apply is 5 September 2013 (midnight CET).

The winners are:

Project name: Somalia: Pirates return to fish Description: A study of Somalia’s development, its new economic strategies and how it impacts the practices of the pirates. Project locations: Somalia, Kenya Media outlet: ABC (Spain)

Project name: Going Dutch Description: An interactive, journalistic investigation on the progress of Dutch international development initiatives according to the eight Millennium Goals. Project locations: Benin, Kenya, Ukraine, Somalia, Tanzania, Sierra Leone, Burkina Faso, Bolivia Media outlets: Beyond Borders Media and GoedTV (The Netherlands)

Project name: impactinvestmentdata.org Description: The project is a series of data-driven articles based on data from a knowledge repository of all projects financed by enterprise grants and impact investors in the energy sector. Impactinvestmentdata.org will bring answers as to what works and what doesn’t in enterprise grant-making and impact investment. Project locations: Development in Paris and Berlin, worldwide coverage Media outlets: Journalism++ (Germany, France), Libération (France), Svenska Dagbladet (Sweden)

Project name: A tale of two villages Description: Comparison of a success story (Chololo village, Tanzania), and a negative experience (Turkana lake, Kenya) in the field of development, each of these stories representing two different models of dealing with cooperation issues. Project locations: Kenya, Tanzania Media outlet: Rolling Stone (Spain)

Project name: Protracted refugee situation at the Horn of Africa Description: An interactive application to explore and learn about the every day life of Somali long-term refugees living in a camp in Ethiopia. The core content of the application will be interactive 360-degree panoramic images. Project locations: Ethiopia Media outlet: Jürgen Schrader for Der Spiegel (Germany)

Project name: Crowdsourced data­driven investigation of land grabbing in Africa Description: This crowdsourced data­journalism project deals with the issue of land grabbing in Africa from two perspectives: top down, by developing interactive maps and infographics visualising the overall issue of land grabbing; bottom up, by collecting stories and evidences from the main actors involved. Project locations: Mozambique Media outlets: Corriere della Sera (ITALY), Internazionale (ITALY), Die Zeit (GERMANY), The Guardian (UK), The Ecologist (UK)

Project name: Rwanda’s historic health recovery Description: Since the genocide in Rwanda nearly 20 years ago, deaths from HIV, TB, and malaria have dropped by 80 percent. Maternal mortality dropped by 60 percent and life expectancy doubled. How have these dramatic improvements been achieved? And can they be replicated elsewhere? Project locations: Rwanda Media outlets: Ruth Evans Productions Ltd. (UK), The Guardian (UK)

Project name: Following money for a better future Description: This project aims to map how Official Development Assistance (ODA) funds from Italy are put to work around the world and to tell real stories on how this money is used. Project locations: South Africa, Cambogia, Tuvalu Media outlet: La Stampa (Italy)

Project name: Cooperation or exploitation: European cash flows in Kenya Description: This interactive multimedia investigation will map the flow of aid money from Spain to Kenya and multinational profits from Kenya to Europe. It will also identify where these interests collide, document their effects on the development agenda through narrative and video storytelling and explore proposals for harmonising development and private investment efforts. Project locations: Spain, Kenya Media outlet: El Mundo

Project name: HIV/AIDS – the beginning of the end Description: This week-long series, reporting from five countries in sub-Saharan Africa, examining five different aspects of the pandemic, will bring a new perspective to the debate about what progress has been made and what remains to be done.  It will examine five key issues: the use of condoms, the prevalence of sex networks, the role of male circumcision, the provision of ARV drugs and HIV testing, and the protection of children. Project locations: Uganda, Malawi, Zambia, Kenya, South Africa Media outlet: The Independent (UK)

Project name: Breaking the digital wall Description: Breaking the Digital Wall is a series of three reports narrated through different journalistic and media tools (text, photo, video, maps, infographics, etc.). Three significant and symbolic stories will be produced on reducing the digital divide in India, Uruguay, and Egypt. Project locations: India, Uruguay, Egypt Media outlets: ABC (Spain), The Post Internazionale (Italy)

Project name: Visualising development data Description: Project Syndicate will collaborate with some of the world’s most prescient global thinkers to provide development-focused commentaries enhanced by interactive graphic visualisation, enabling readers to gain a deeper understanding of the issues shaping their world. Project locations: Czech Republic and worldwide Media outlets: Project Syndicate (Czech Republic), Les Echos (France), Het Financieele Dagblad (The Netherlands), Il Sole 24 Ore (Italy)

Project name: Ecocide Description: The term ecocide designates a deliberate, large-scale destruction
of the natural environment. In 2013, Le Monde intends to send five of its reporters, along with a legal expert and photographers, to investigate five criminal networks of these new mafias with an original and participative approach. Project locations: 10-12 countries around the world (among which France, Italy, Netherlands, Madagascar, China, India, etc.) Media outlet: Le Monde (France)

Project name: The future of the world food markets Description: The project will look into the possible causes of the growing instability of food prices as well as solutions being proposed by various actors. Project locations: France Media outlet: Les Echos (France)

Project name: Juba in the making Description: Juba in the making is a character-driven web documentary and game, where the users take active part in the building of the capital city of the youngest country on earth - South Sudan. Project locations: South Sudan, Italy, France Media outlet: L’Espresso (Italy)

Project name: The real impact of aid Description: This project aims to be an x-ray examination of how Spanish foreign aid has been spent for the past six years, up to the last cent. This project will make the data available in a searchable database and will explain in clear terms how aid is spent through graphics, interactive features and stories. Project locations: TBD Media outlets: El Confidencial (Spain), laSexta (Spain)

The Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage through awarding funding to a selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

###

Email: info@journalismgrants.org Website: http://journalismgrants.org Facebook: http://facebook.com/journalism.grants Twitter: http://twitter.com/journagrants

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, in cooperation with Georgian Institute of Public Affairs (GIPA), presents New World of Journalism in the Digital Age course.

When: Classes will be held from June 24 – 28 (from 10:00 to 18:00) in Tbilisi, Georgia. Admission has started and will continue through: June 14.

Overview: This 5-day program is aimed at mid-level editors or top-level managers who oversee departments of reporters and writers and other journalists, in a variety of platforms, from magazines/newspapers, broadcast or online. Workshops provide perspectives on the latest trends in digital journalism, including how to make data more visual; how the internet is changing investigative reporting; strategic use of mobile technology; challenges news media companies face amid changing roles in newsroom jobs and better ways to engage readers. Sessions will spur discussion on how to integrate digital journalists with those working in other platforms, building awareness of new digital tools and practices, and how editors can strategize to help their companies compete in the rapidly changing media world.

Instructors: Workshops will be taught by graduates from the Columbia University Graduate School of Journalism, and key news media professionals noted for their wide expertise in topics ranging from web metrics analysis, digital storytelling, social media journalism, interactive graphics, newsroom integration and more. Anup Kaphle, the digital editor for Washington Post’s foreign and national security coverage, and Irene Jay Liu, the current news editor (data) at Thomson Reuters, will be among the lineup of speakers that will be present. 

Certificate: Successful applicants will receive a joint certificate from Columbia University and Georgian Institute of Public Affairs (GIPA) in New World of Journalism in the Digital Age course.

Pricing: The attendance fee is $2000 per participant, and includes all training provided by Columbia Journalism School Continuing Education Programs, daily breakfast, lunch and beverages, a mid-week dinner, subject materials and use of our facilities and Wi-Fi connections. The fee should be paid in advance.

Costs for all travel and accommodations, as well as any other tours/side trips, are to be arranged and borne by the company/participants.

Registration: To register for this course, please send a copy of your CV, ID and a statement of purpose to jaba@gipa.ge with ‘NEW WORLD’ as the subject line.

Please note: Columbia University reserves the right to cancel and/or reschedule a course based on enrollment figures. In the event of cancellation or postponement, the Continuing Education department will offer reimbursement for the course. In other cases, all sales are final. Continuing Education does not offer refunds, credits or exchanges. We apologize, but there are no exceptions to this rule.

Contact Information: Jaba Bokuchava—Training / Marketing Manager, Caucasus School of Journalism and Media Management (CSJMM), Georgian Institute of Public Administration (GIPA)

E-mail: jaba@gipa.ge

Office: + (995 32) 249-75-01; Cell: + (995 599) 25-01-00

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

We and our Kenyan partner AfricaonAir implemented in May our first Reporting Development workshop to specialise on a specific development theme - agriculture. We had eight journalists from different media houses all based in the provinces and representing different platforms - radio, print and Online. The 3 day training ran from 13 - 15 May. In keeping with the practical hands-on approach to our training, for one of the days, trainers took the group on a field trip just outside Nairobi where we visited and spoke to a a very inspirational farmer who started his farming business with just $6 and it’s now worth more than $100,000. The farmer is now exporting his poultry farming technology to other African countries like Burundi, Zambia and South Sudan. The journalists were extremely happy with the field visit, which gave them a story or two to do that will form the basis of our group work later on. The trip also generated ideas for more stories on agriculture.
chickens
AfricaonAir trainees observe quail chicks at Kaki Village Enterprise owned by Geoffrey Kago (left) during a visit to his farm just outside Nairobi, Tuesday 14 May, as part of a course on reporting agriculture.

 

man with chicken
Allan Obiero, a radio reporter, tests the weight of a bird during a field visit to Kaki Village Enterprise just outside Nairobi as part of a course on reporting agriculture organised by AfricaonAir.

 

holding chicken
Journalists Allan Obiero and Petronilla Wangui interacting with birds during a field visit to Kaki Village Enterprise just outside Nairobi, as part of a course on reporting agriculture organised by AfricaonAir.

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Project:
Kenya: Raising Development Awareness Through the Media
The lack of in-depth, well-researched, and effective reporting on development issues in Kenya is weakening the media’s capacity to have an impact on the country’s political processes. EJC’s Kenya programme seeks to raise awareness to this problem, offering workshops dedicated to developing practical solutions by promoting relevant, powerful, and effective journalistic storytelling.

After receiving more than 500 proposals in the first round of the Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme, the European Journalism Centre (EJC) has invited 43 applicants to submit a full proposal with supporting documentation by May 19.

EJC Director Wilfried Rütten asserted that making the pre-selection posed a rather formidable challenge: “We were very pleased to see that the vast majority of all story pitches we received were of excellent quality and would well deserve to be produced in any case. The proposals proved that if there is a deficit of development coverage in European media, this is certainly not due to a shortage of competent journalists. Accordingly, we had a difficult time making the shortlist decisions.”

The EJC trusts that the shortlist will yield reporting projects that cast the light of public attention on a number of otherwise under-reported development issues. Winning projects will be distributed through strong media channels in order to achieve optimal impact, and will represent the eight participating countries in a broadly proportional fashion.

The grantees for the first round will be notified on May 31.

All applicants who did not make it on the shortlist during the first call for proposals, or did not get around to pitching their development reporting idea in time, should keep the next submission deadline in mind. The second deadline to apply is on 2 September 2013. The Innovation in Development Reporting Grant Programme is calling in particular for pitches with a special angle on development, an innovative approach to implementation and presentation, and/or a focus on a deserving, yet under-reported topic.

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

ST. PETERSBURG, Fla. (May, 2013) – The Poynter Institute and the European Journalism Centre (EJC) are partnering to teach journalists the skills and values needed to create journalism for emerging democracies across the world. The latest collaborative program, focused on Indonesian reporters, is part of Poynter’s ongoing international effort to equip and inspire journalists to practice the highest standards of the profession.


“We believe strongly that good journalism improves democracies, and Indonesia is no different,” said Stephen Buckley, dean of faculty at Poynter. “That’s especially true for countries that are either struggling with the democratic process, or have embraced democracy only in the last decade or two.”

“The EJC looks forward to continuing our cooperation with the Poynter Institute. We see this as an important opportunity to share the highest standards of journalistic professionalism and ethics at a global level” says Wilfried Ruetten, EJC director. “We firmly believe that we can help reinforce the key role journalists play in society as watchdogs and guardians of the public interest.”

Poynter and the EJC will develop a 10-week training program for members of the Jakarta-based Indonesian Association for Media Development. “Strengthening Your Journalism With Clarity and Accuracy” will be taught online and on-site for 20 Indonesian journalists. The course will cover, among other topics, Journalism Values in the Digital Age, Accuracy in Sourcing and Data, and Clarity in Writing. 

As a pilot, the course will be taught in English through Poynter’s e-learning portal, News University. Students will attend live online lectures and chats, and complete weekly readings and assignments. Video and audio sessions provide opportunities for the group to reflect on major themes, and interactive exercises help underscore important concepts. At the end of the e-learning course, Poynter faculty will travel to Jakarta to lead a two-day workshop. Students who have successfully completed the e-learning course will be invited to participate in this session. 

“The combination of Poynter in-person and online training is powerful,” said Howard Finberg, Poynter’s director of training partnerships and alliances. “What makes this project particularly exciting is the opportunity to work with a partner to increase its training capacity.” The second phase of the project, planned for 2014, will create a version of the course in Bahasa Indonesia, the official language of the country.

The project is funded through the MFSII instrument of the Netherlands Foreign Ministry. It is part of a much broader global five year project called Press Freedom 2.0 that includes Dutch‐based partners Free Press Unlimited, World Press Photo, European Partnership for Democracy, and Mensen met een Missie who are working in 11 countries on five continents.

In 2012, Poynter worked with the EJC on an innovative, three-month e-learning course for journalists and journalism students from the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland and Slovakia. “Reporting and Writing About Development in the World” helped prepare participants for the challenges of covering the political and economic issues inherent in international development stories. The course was funded by the European Commission’s V4Aid project, which promotes awareness of development issues in the European Union’s new member states. 

About The Poynter Institute

The Poynter Institute for Media Studies is an international leader in journalism education, and a strategy center that stands for uncompromising excellence in journalism, media and 21st century public discourse. Poynter faculty teach seminars and workshops at the Institute in St. Petersburg, Fla., and at conferences and organizational sites around the world. Its e-learning division, News University, offers the world’s largest online journalism curriculum, with more than 250 interactive courses and 240,000 students. The Institute’s website produces 24-hour coverage of news about media, ethics, technology, the business of news and the trends that currently define and redefine journalism news reporting. The world’s top journalists and media innovators come to Poynter to learn and teach new generations of reporters, storytellers, media inventors, designers, visual journalists, documentarians and broadcast producers, and to build public awareness about journalism, media, the First Amendment and protected discourse that serves democracy and the public good.

CONTACT:

EJC Project Manager .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

+31 43 325 40 30

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

+1 (727) 821-9494

.(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address)

+1 (727) 821-9494

 

 

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

On 1-2 June 2013, the European Journalism Centre and De Persgroep, a leading media company in the Flemish/Dutch media landscape, will organise a hackathon as part of the Random Hacks of Kindness (RHoK) Global events in Asse, Belgium.

Emergency Journalism, an initiative by the European Journalism Centre, focuses on bettering the newsroom information workflow during humanitarian crises. One of its core missions is to explore how technology could support journalists to quickly mine the relevant crowdsourced content when unexpected events such as shootings and extreme weather conditions threaten peoples’ lives.

At the hackathon, the organisers would like to create the foundation for a sustainable, open framework where news journalists can find the relevant news and social media contents in real-time. It will be a first step forward to establish a newsgathering/content-mining tool that can be used by various newsrooms, including small/medium-sized ones with limited resources.

For those interested in attending this hackathon, the registration is open at the RHoK Belgium website

For more information about Emergency Journalism and the hackathon, please contact Project Manager .(JavaScript must be enabled to view this email address).

 

Project:
Emergency Journalism
The objective of this initiative is to brings together news and resources necessary for media professionals reporting in and about volatile situations. Featuring up-to-date digital tools varying from content curation tools to multi-layered live maps, the initiative supports media coverage of emergencies such as natural disasters and political conflicts.

The university faculty team winners of the first ever European Journalism Centre (EJC) organised Investigative Journalism Competitions in Bolivia, were announced 30 April in Santa Cruz. Taking top prizes were the five student teams representing first place Universidad Evangélica Boliviana and second place Universidad NUR, both of Santa Cruz. Both schools will be part of a media visit organised by the Clarin Journalism School in Buenos Aires, Argentina.

Hosted locally by the Bolivian Association of Faculties of Communication (ABOCCS), the three-day simulated mock investigative journalism competition focused on writing and interviewing style as well as featured embedded lessons in journalism ethics and issues related to press freedom. 

Over 80 students and coaches from 14 ABOCCS-member Universities from across Bolivia participated in the competition. Bolivian students got the chance to enrich their university education by simulating the reality of the daily business of investigative journalists. 

During three days the students came face to face with the reality of the work of an investigative journalist through engagement in a simulated case of drug trafficking.  Students had to resolve and later write a story about the case based on their investigations. Santa Cruz locals acted as sources of information for the participants based on their interviewing technique and attention to journalistic ethics. 

“I think this competition supported the creativity, honesty and ethical behavior of our students and also emphasized the importance of finding a story through thorough investigation,” says Julvi Molina, president of ABOCCS. 

A jury consisting of established journalists from cities’ faculties that participated in the competition rated the final reportages: Monica Arrien (La Paz), Franz Torres (Sucre), Betty Condori  (Cochabamba), Maggy Talavera (Santa Cruz) and Monica Amarayo (Oruro). In their story evaluations judges strongly took into account the level of journalistic professionalism, the correct use of sources, adherence to journalism ethics as well as the thorough investigation of the story. 

“The best experience was to realise the true level of responsibility that investigative journalists have, “ says Karen Hikari Chibana (Universidad NUR, Santa Cruz). “It is not only about resolving the case, but to also pressure media and society to keep on investigating and dealing with current issues.”  

The competition was first successfully initiated by EJC in Armenia in 2008 and is part of the EJC’ s five year Press Freedom 2.0 consortium global media development programming funded by the Netherlands Ministry of Foreign Affairs.   

“Our hope is that the students took away not only the technical and ethical aspects of investigative reporting,” says EJC Bolivia Country Manager Josh LaPorte, “but also a deeper understanding of press freedom law as the cornerstone of what enables investigative journalists the opportunity to uphold their society watchdog role”.

 

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

This week with sponsorship and support from the European Journalism Centre, Fundacion para el Periodismo (FPP), a media education institution based in La Paz Bolivia, presented the Spanish language handbook version of “A Guide to Reporting Development”, which aims to act as a key resource for Bolivian journalists in the coverage and conduct of reporting on issues linked to human and economic development of society. The original version of the manual was written in English by British journalist Oliver Wates and translated, edited, adapted and localised by Bolivian journalist Isabel Mercado.

The guide consists of three narrative chapters. The first, “Development As News” aims to introduce the reader to the issues of development and stresses the importance and impacts of development reporting on society. The second, entitled “How Development Aid Works” discusses the organisations that work to promote the development of nations and how journalists can relate to them. The third and final chapter “Issues” addresses, from a journalistic perspective, localised development areas such as education, health, water and sanitation, women’s rights, climate change and governance, among others. The appendix includes statistics and indexes related specifically to Bolivia and the United Nations Millennium Development Goals.

“This manual is designed for journalists interested in writing about development without necessarily having experience in the field. Its purpose is to provide guidance on how to approach this issue and seek information, “says Victor Toro, President of the Board of Fundacion para el Periodismo at the launch of the guide in Bolivia’s capital La Paz.

“You don’t get people interested in ending poverty or getting girls into school just by caring passionately about it,” says the manual’s author Wates. “You have to know how to write about it in a way that interests them. Hopefully this will help Bolivian journalists to do precisely that.”  

The guide and its countrywide launch are part of the EJC’s multi-year commitment to media development in Bolivia, an important component of which includes increasing the local media’s capacity for societal impact. “The role media can play in bringing visibility to development issues is vital”, says EJC Bolivia country manager Josh LaPorte. “Decision-makers, society’s agents of change and the public at large, can be strongly influenced and pressured by timely, hard-hitting, compelling and factual development reporting.”   

The project is funded through the MFSII instrument of the Netherlands Foreign Ministry in The Hague.  It is part of a much broader global five year project ‘Press Freedom 2.0’ that includes Dutch-based media partners World Press Photo, Free Press Unlimited and Mensen met een Missie working in 11 countries on five continents.  

Project:
MFSII - Press Freedom 2.0
A five-year, international media development initiative, Press Freedom 2.0 aims to support democratic development by empowering civil society, citizens, and local media organisations through the implementation of local media projects. Conducted by a Dutch consortium, the Press Freedom initiative offers a range of trainings and activities specifically tailored to the needs of 11 selected countries.

Project:
Bolivia: Press Freedom, Journalism Training, and Media Literacy
The EJC is engaged in three different media projects, each of them aiming to bring change to Bolivia’s media environment. Focusing on press freedom, mainly through the protection of journalists’ rights and media ethics, journalism training, and media literacy, the projects are designed to answer the needs and expectations of both media professionals and civil society activists in the country.

This year, the ThinkBrigade project has been nominated for a BOBS Award under the Best Blog English category. 

Thinkbrigade is an independent online magazine, which is published by a united, collaborative and multimedia team of 35 international reporters on a voluntary basis. It aims to showcase best practices of multimedia reporting through a team-based method, where reporters share ideas and skills while covering our most pressing global issues.

Cast your vote here

Project:
ThinkBrigade
This web magazine showcases the collective and collaborative journalistic production of an international team, comprising of journalists, bloggers, photographers, and sector experts, striving to bring to the centre of the stage under-covered issues of international importance, while also providing a reflection on best-practices in the news gathering and publication process.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce that it has received more than 500 applications in the first round of the Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme.

“We are very happy to observe such a high media interest in reporting global development stories. Regardless of the outcome, we are very enthusiastic that over the past two months journalists and media organisations have taken a closer look at and really thought outside of the box when it comes to stories from the developing world. We hope that media houses will keep up this trend, as a well-informed public in the developed world can have a positive impact on policies for the developing world”, said Wilfried Ruetten, EJC Director.

Over the next three weeks, the EJC will evaluate the entries and inform all applicants of the status of their application(s). Due to the large number of submissions, we will however not be able to give individual feedback to unsuccessful candidates. Shortlisted applicants will have one month’s time to submit a complete proposal and provide any necessary supporting documents. The first grants will be announced at the end of May.

Everyone else whose best global development pitch is still on the shelf: don’t be discouraged. On the 3rd of April we will be opening our second call for applications.

In order to give interested candidates sufficient time to prepare powerful proposals we will run a second, longer round over the coming five months, as opposed to the remaining two shorter rounds that were planned initially.

The second round to submit entries will run until midnight (24:00) CET on 2 September 2013.

The Innovation for Development Reporting Grant Programme (IDR) was launched in January 2013 by the EJC with support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation. The project aims to reward quality journalism and advance a new and distinctive agenda for development coverage.

A selection of state-of-the-art reporting projects of great impact and high visibility will be awarded funding in 2013.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

A fuller picture of migration journalism

A comparative analysis of media coverage of migration issues in five countries, Canada, France, Germany, the Netherlands, and the United States, showed that:

  • at face value, mainstream news media are broadly adhering to journalistic standards when covering migration;
  • migration is, however, frequently framed and presented in a way that may counteract the spirit of journalism ethics;
  • the reporting agenda is strongly influenced by a national focus and has deficits where the big picture of migration is concerned.

The findings of the study were presented and discussed at the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations (UNAOC). 

The study was carried out by the EJC, in cooperation with the University of King’s College (Canada), the Institut National de l’Audiovisuel (France), Deutsche Welle Akademie (Germany), Christelijke Hogeschool Ede (The Netherlands), and the University of Missouri (United States). The International Federation of Red Cross and Red Crescent Societies provided expert advice, and the Open Society Fund to Counter Xenophobia co-funded the project.

Project:
Comparative Pilot Study on Media Coverage of Migration
Wishing to evaluate the quality and pertinence of migration coverage by mainstream media, particularly in election period, the EJC conducted an experimental, data-driven research project, analysing migration reporting in the Netherlands, the United States, Canada, France, and Germany. The study was conducted together with the United Nations Alliance of Civilizations.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is pleased to announce that it has received financial support from the Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation to advance journalistic coverage of issues related to global development and the United Nations’ Millennium Development Goals. Therefore, in 2013 the EJC will implement a grants programme supported by the Gates Foundation.

The Centre will provide a selection of innovative reporting projects with the necessary funds to enable journalists, editors, and development stakeholders to perform thorough research and to develop entirely new and experimental reporting and presentation methods. They will also be able to use multi-platform approaches and to think laterally across disciplines and techniques of journalistic storytelling. Award decisions, based on journalistic quality and merit, will be taken in complete editorial independence from the Gates Foundation. The programme will launch three rounds of open calls for proposals and, in parallel, proactively solicit proposals from eminent media outlets focusing on the eight European countries with the highest development spending, namely France, Germany, Italy, the Netherlands, Norway, Spain, Sweden, and the United Kingdom. Funding will cover direct expenses for journalistic research and study trips, possible technical costs for crews and equipment, data acquisition and analysis, visualisation, etc. Interested parties may apply for full or partial grants, excluding, however, salaries of permanent staff. More detailed information on the application procedure, deadlines, and the aims of the project can be found at www.journalismgrants.org.

The Bill & Melinda Gates Foundation, shares the conviction with the EJC that the lack of media coverage of international development issues in European news outlets is in part due to a lack of incentives for journalists and media organisations to cover development. The main aim, then, behind implementing the grant programme is to better enable quality journalism at a time where many media organisations face financial constraints and to stimulate new and creative reporting approaches.

The European Journalism Centre (EJC) is a non-profit international foundation with the remit to improve, strengthen, and underpin journalism and the news media. This mission has two main aspects: On the one hand, it is about safeguarding, enhancing, and future-proofing quality journalism in Europe and on the other hand, it is about supporting initiatives towards press freedom in emerging and developing countries. This often includes creating the framework conditions for independent and self-determined journalism in the first place. To these ends, the EJC provides thematic training, professional capacity development, and a wide range of support activities for journalists.

Project:
Journalism Grants: Innovation in Development Reporting
Development reporting remains too often marginalised, compared to the general coverage time given to other societal and political matters. To address this problem, the EJC, supported by the Gates Foundation, has established this grants programme, dedicated to promoting innovative reporting projects that address development issues.

Following the past three successful editions, the fourth round of CL!CK ABOUT IT focused on the theme “Crises & Disasters”. This competition received over 2000 photographs from more than 570 qualified applicants from all around the world. The sub-topics were as follows:

  • Natural disaster: floods, earthquakes, hurricanes, tornadoes, droughts and other life-threatening natural disasters. 
  • Political uprising: Arab spring, occupy movements and other demonstrations protesting for change. 
  • Conflict: wars, conflicts and clashes at international, regional and local level. 
  • Financial crisis: signs of financial crisis and how the life of local communities is being affected.  
  • Development crisis: crises that are related to health, food, water, sanitation and education. 
  • Urban life: population growth, fast urban development and negative effects on environment. 
  • Climate change: signs of climate change in your backyard.

Two overall winners will be awarded with a reporting trip, organised by the EJC, to a post-disaster area in early 2013. Five runners-up will receive a 200 US dollar Amazon coupon or money transfer of the equivalent amount. Two honorable mentions were added for their significant work and will receive a 100 US dollar Amazon coupon or money transfer of the equivalent amount.

Overall Winners

Runners-up



Honorable Mention
 

  • Sucheta Das and Gmb Akash.

The international jury and the European Journalism Centre would like to congratulate the winners and runners-up as well as all the participants who have submitted amazing photographic work for this competition. The quality and diversity of the submitted work was substantial, making this edition one of the best competition rounds so far.

Project:
CL!CK ABOUT IT
The international photography competition, established in parallel to TH!NK ABOUT IT, EJC's blogging competition, created a mosaic of images that addressed issues of global impact. Calling upon professional and amateur photographers alike, CL!CK rewarded both the technical quality of the photos and the photographers’ capacity to reflect upon the issues they wished to tackle.